North Miami Beach

11 November 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Miami

Art Deco Hotel in the North Shore Historic District © flickr.com - Phillip Pessar/cc-by-2.0

Art Deco Hotel in the North Shore Historic District © flickr.com – Phillip Pessar/cc-by-2.0

North Miami Beach (commonly referred to as NMB) is a city in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Originally named Fulford-by-the-Sea in 1926 after Captain William H. Fulford of the United States Coast Guard, the city was renamed North Miami Beach in 1931. The population is at 46,000. The hurricane of 1926 essentially ended the South Florida real estate boom, and in an effort to alleviate their losses and the damage to the city, local residents came together as the Town of Fulford. In 1927, the city was incorporated as the City of Fulford. Although the North Miami Beach boundaries once stretched to the Atlantic Ocean, this city on the Intracoastal Waterway no longer has any beaches within its city limits, although they are a short distance away across the inlet. North Miami Beach has a large middle class Haitian-American and Jewish-American community who were born in the U.S. or abroad.   read more…

Statue of Liberty in New York City

8 November 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Museums, Exhibitions, New York City, UNESCO World Heritage

© flickr.com - William Warby/cc-by-2.0

© flickr.com – William Warby/cc-by-2.0

The Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World) is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor in New York, in the United States. The copper statue, a gift from the people of France to the people of the United States, was designed by French sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and its metal framework was built by Gustave Eiffel. The statue was dedicated on October 28, 1886.   read more…

Pasadena City Hall

4 November 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, General, Green Buildings

© David Wakely/cc-by-sa-2.5

© David Wakely/cc-by-sa-2.5

Pasadena City Hall, completed in 1927, serves as the central location for city government in the City of Pasadena, California and it is a significant architectural example of the City Beautiful movement of the 1920s.   read more…

The museum ship Seute Deern

1 November 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Tall ships, Yacht of the Month

© Garitzko

© Garitzko

The Seute Deern (Low German for Sweet Girl) – originally Elisabeth Bandi, later Bandi and Pieter Albrecht Koerts – is a wooden bark and restaurant ship in Bremerhaven. The ship was declared a cultural heritage in 2005 as part of the overall German Maritime Museum. On August 31, 2019 Seute Deern sank in the Old Port.   read more…

Hunts Point Cooperative Market in New York

1 November 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month, New York City

© flickr.com - Doc Searls/cc-by-sa-2.0

© flickr.com – Doc Searls/cc-by-sa-2.0

The Hunts Point Cooperative Market, a 24/7 wholesale food market located on 60 acres (24 ha) in the Hunts Point neighborhood of the Bronx, New York City, is the largest food distribution center of its kind in the world. Its revenues exceed $2 billion annually.   read more…

Cannery Row in Monterey

1 November 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

© FASTILY/cc-by-sa-4.0

© FASTILY/cc-by-sa-4.0

Cannery Row is the waterfront street in the New Monterey section of Monterey, California. It is the site of a number of now-defunct sardine canning factories. The last cannery closed in 1973. The street name, formerly a nickname for Ocean View Avenue, became official in January 1958 to honor John Steinbeck and his well-known novel Cannery Row. In the novel’s opening sentence, Steinbeck described the street as “a poem, a stink, a grating noise, a quality of light, a tone, a habit, a nostalgia, a dream.”   read more…

Temple Square in Salt Lake City

16 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Museums, Exhibitions

Salt Lake Temple © Famartin/cc-by-sa-4.0

Salt Lake Temple © Famartin/cc-by-sa-4.0

Temple Square is a 10-acre (4.0 ha) complex, owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), in the center of Salt Lake City, Utah, and is considered “The Vatican of the Mormons“. In recent years, the usage of the name has gradually changed to include several other church facilities that are immediately adjacent to Temple Square. Contained within Temple Square are the Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake Tabernacle, Salt Lake Assembly Hall, the Seagull Monument, and two visitors’ centers. The square was designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1964, recognizing the Mormon achievement in the settlement of Utah.   read more…

The United States: Bon voyage!

12 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Editorial, General, Los Angeles, Miami, New York City, UNESCO World Heritage

© Lipton sale/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Lipton sale/cc-by-sa-3.0

Tourism in the United States is a large industry that serves millions of international and domestic tourists yearly. Tourists visit the US to see natural wonders, cities, historic landmarks, and entertainment venues. Americans seek similar attractions, as well as recreation and vacation areas. Tourism in the United States grew rapidly in the form of urban tourism during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. By the 1850s, tourism in the United States was well established both as a cultural activity and as an industry. New York, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and San Francisco, all major US cities (cities in the United States), attracted a large number of tourists by the 1890s. By 1915, city touring had marked significant shifts in the way Americans perceived, organized, and moved. In the US, tourism is either the first, second, or third largest employer in 29 states, employing 7.3 million, to take care of 1.19 billion trips tourists took in the US (a culinary journey through the USA). There are 2,500 registered National Historic Landmarks (NHL) recognized by the United States government and 24 World Heritage Sites. As of 2016, Orlando is the most visited destination in the United States. Meanwhile New York and Los Angeles took over rank 1 and 2, placing Orlando on rank 3. Tourists spend more money in the United States than in any other country, while attracting the second-highest number of tourists after France. All of the 50 states have nicknames.   read more…

Mickey’s Diner in Saint Paul

9 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, Design & Products, General

© Tenzin Dongag/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Tenzin Dongag/cc-by-sa-3.0

Mickey’s Diner is a classic diner in downtown Saint Paul, Minnesota. It has been in continuous operation at the same location since 1939. Designed to resemble a railroad dining car, the prefabricated building was constructed in 1937 by the Jerry O’Mahony Diner Company of Elizabeth, New Jersey, then shipped to Saint Paul by rail. Its unusual architecture made it a local landmark. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983 for having local significance in the themes of architecture and commerce. It was nominated for being “a beloved, longstanding and unique social institution,” an unaltered example of railroad car-style diners, and one of the few surviving examples of its type in the American Midwest.   read more…

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