92Y on the Upper East Side of Manhattan

1 June 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month, Museums, Exhibitions, New York City, Opera Houses, Theaters, Libraries

Theresa l. Kaufmann Auditorium © Yair Haklai/cc-by-sa-3.0

Theresa l. Kaufmann Auditorium © Yair Haklai/cc-by-sa-3.0

92nd Street Y (92Y) is a cultural and community center located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City, at the corner of East 92nd Street and Lexington Avenue. Its full name is 92nd Street Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association (YM-YWHA). It is not part of the YMCA. Founded in 1874 as the Young Men’s Hebrew Association (YMHA) by German-Jewish professionals and businessmen, 92nd Street Y has grown into an organization guided by Jewish principles but serving people of all races and faiths. The YMHA founded in 1889 The Educational Alliance, together with the Aguilar Free Library, and the Hebrew Institute.   read more…

Carlyle Hotel in the Upper East Side

11 February 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Hotels, New York City

Carlyle Hotel © Jim.henderson

Carlyle Hotel © Jim.henderson

The Carlyle Hotel, known formally as The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel, is a combination luxury and residential hotel located at 35 East 76th Street on the northeast corner of Madison Avenue and East 76th Street, on the Upper East Side of New York City. Opened in 1930, the hotel was designed in Art Deco style and was named after Scottish essayist Thomas Carlyle. Owned since 2001 by Rosewood Hotels & Resorts, the Carlyle is a cooperative with 190 rental rooms and suites, and 60 privately owned residences. The Carlyle Restaurant was formerly known as Dumonet at the Carlyle. The Carlyle is famous for its extraordinary discretion.   read more…

Yorkville in Manhattan

10 October 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, New York City

90th Street and Second Avenue © flickr.com - mike/cc-by-sa-2.0

90th Street and Second Avenue © flickr.com – mike/cc-by-sa-2.0

Yorkville is a neighborhood in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. Its southern boundary is East 79th Street, its northern East 96th Street, its western Third Avenue, and its eastern the East River. The neighborhood, in Manhattan Community Board 8, is among the most affluent in the city. In August 1776, George Washington stationed half of his Continental Army in Manhattan, with many troops in the Yorkville area in defensive positions along the East River to protect the other half of his army if they were to retreat from Brooklyn, and to inflict damage on invading land and sea forces. Following the Battle of Long Island defeat on August 27, the Continentals implemented an orderly pivoting retreat in the Yorkville area, leading the enemy to entice the Continentals to fight by piping “Fly Away”, about a fox running away from hounds. The Continentals’ disciplined northerly retreat led to the successful Battle of Harlem Heights in September 1776.   read more…

Theme Week New York City – The Upper East Side

13 September 2017 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, New York City

Fifth Avenue © flickr.com - Alex Proimos/cc-by-2.0

Fifth Avenue © flickr.com – Alex Proimos/cc-by-2.0

The Upper East Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, between Central Park/Fifth Avenue, 59th Street, the East River, and 96th Street. The area incorporates several smaller neighborhoods, including Lenox Hill, Carnegie Hill, and Yorkville. Once known as the Silk Stocking District, it is now one of the most affluent neighborhoods in New York City. In the 19th century the farmland and market garden district of what was to be the Upper East Side was still traversed by the Boston Post Road and, from 1837, the New York and Harlem Railroad, which brought straggling commercial development around its one station in the neighborhood, at 86th Street, which became the heart of German Yorkville. The area was defined by the attractions of the bluff overlooking the East River, which ran without interruption from James William Beekman‘s “Mount Pleasant”, north of the marshy squalor of Turtle Bay, to Gracie Mansion, north of which the land sloped steeply to the wetlands that separated this area from the suburban village of Harlem. Among the series of villas a Schermerhorn country house overlooked the river at the foot of present-day 73rd Street and another, Peter Schermerhorn’s at 66th Street, and the Riker homestead was similarly sited at the foot of 75th Street. By the mid-19th century the farmland had largely been subdivided, with the exception of the 150 acres (61 ha) of Jones’s Wood, stretching from 66th to 76th Streets and from the Old Post Road (Third Avenue) to the river and the farmland inherited by James Lenox, who divided it into blocks of houselots in the 1870s, built his Lenox Library on a Fifth Avenue lot at the farm’s south-west corner, and donated a full square block for the Presbyterian Hospital, between 70th and 71st Streets, and Madison and Park Avenues. At that time, along the Boston Post Road taverns stood at the mile-markers, Five-Mile House at 72nd Street and Six-Mile House at 97th, a New Yorker recalled in 1893.   read more…

The Plaza in Midtown Manhattan

16 June 2017 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, General, Hotels, New York City

The Plaza Hotel, as seen from across The Pond in Central Park © OptimumPx

The Plaza Hotel, as seen from across The Pond in Central Park © OptimumPx

The Plaza Hotel, located in the Midtown Manhattan neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan, New York City, is a landmark 20-story luxury hotel and condominium apartment building, owned by an Indian conglomerate, Sahara India Pariwar. With a height of 250 ft (76 m) and a length of 400 ft (120 m), the hotel occupies the west side of Grand Army Plaza, from which it derives its name, and extends along Central Park South in Manhattan. Fifth Avenue extends along the east side of Grand Army Plaza. The Plaza Hotel is recognized as a Historic Hotel of America by the National Trust for Historic Preservation.   read more…

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