Hollywood Hills in Los Angeles

10 June 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Environment, General, Los Angeles

© panoramio.com - Ameer Attia/cc-by-3.0

© panoramio.com – Ameer Attia/cc-by-3.0

The Hollywood Hills is a hillside neighborhood of the same name in the central region of the city of Los Angeles. The Hollywood Hills straddle the Cahuenga Pass within the Santa Monica Mountains. The neighborhood touches Studio City, Universal City and Burbank on the north, Griffith Park on the north and east, Los Feliz on the southeast, Hollywood on the south and Hollywood Hills West on the west. It includes Forest Lawn Memorial Park, the Hollywood Reservoir, the Hollywood Sign, the Hollywood Bowl and the John Anson Ford Theater.   read more…

Theme Week Los Angeles – Dolby Theatre

27 February 2017 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Los Angeles, Opera Houses, Theaters, Libraries

© flickr.com - Adam Fagen/cc-by-sa-2.0

© flickr.com – Adam Fagen/cc-by-sa-2.0

The Dolby Theatre (formerly known as the Kodak Theatre) is a live-performance auditorium in the Hollywood and Highland Center shopping mall and entertainment complex, on Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue, in the Hollywood district of Los Angeles. Since its opening on November 9, 2001, the theater has hosted the Academy Awards ceremonies (the Oscars), initially held there in March 2002. It is the first permanent home for these annual awards ceremonies. The front of the theater is a part of the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The theater was designed by David Rockwell of the Rockwell Group, with Theatre Projects Consultants, specifically with the Oscar ceremonies in mind. Though the stage is one of the largest in the United States — roughly tied with the Elliott Hall of Music at Purdue University — measuring 113 ft (34 m) wide and 60 ft (18 m) deep, its seating capacity is only about half the Hall of Music’s, accommodating 3,332 people.   read more…

Theme Week Los Angeles – Griffith Park

10 February 2017 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Los Angeles, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks

Griffith Observatory © Matthew Field/cc-by-2.5

Griffith Observatory © Matthew Field/cc-by-2.5

Griffith Park is a large municipal park at the eastern end of the Santa Monica Mountains, in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles. The park covers 4,310 acres (1,740 ha) of land, making it one of the largest urban parks in North America. It is the second-largest city park in California, after Mission Trails Preserve in San Diego, and the 11th largest municipally owned park in the United States. It has also been referred to as the Central Park of Los Angeles but is much larger, more untamed, and rugged than its New York City counterpart. After successfully investing in mining, Colonel Griffith J. Griffith purchased Rancho Los Feliz (near the Los Angeles River) in 1882 and started an ostrich farm there. Although ostrich feathers were commonly used in making women’s hats in the late-19th century, Griffith’s purpose was primarily to lure residents of Los Angeles to his nearby property developments, which supposedly were haunted by the ghost of Antonio Feliz (a previous owner of the property). After the property rush peaked, Griffith donated 3,015 acres (1,220 ha) to the city of Los Angeles on December 16, 1896. Afterward Griffith was tried and convicted for shooting and severely wounding his wife in a 1903 incident. When released from prison, he attempted to fund the construction of an amphitheater, observatory, planetarium, and a girls’ camp and boys’ camp in the park. His reputation in the city was tainted by his crime, however, so the city refused his money.   read more…

TCL Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles

20 January 2017 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Los Angeles, Opera Houses, Theaters, Libraries

© sailko/cc-by-sa-3-0

© sailko/cc-by-sa-3-0

TCL Chinese Theatre is a cinema palace on the historic Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6925 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood in Los Angeles. There are nearly 200 Hollywood celebrity handprints, footprints, and autographs in the concrete of the theatre’s forecourt. Originally known as Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, it was renamed Mann’s Chinese Theatre in 1973; the name lasted until 2001, after which it reverted to its original name. On January 11, 2013, Chinese electronics manufacturer TCL Corporation purchased the naming rights to the facility, making its official name TCL Chinese Theatre. The original Chinese Theatre was commissioned following the success of the nearby Grauman’s Egyptian Theatre, which opened in 1922. Built by a partnership headed by Sid Grauman over 18 months starting in January 1926, the theatre opened May 18, 1927, with the premiere of Cecil B. DeMille‘s film The King of Kings. It has since been home to many premieres, including the 1977 launch of George LucasStar Wars, as well as birthday parties, corporate junkets, and three Academy Awards ceremonies. Among the theatre’s most distinctive features are the concrete blocks set in the forecourt, which bear the signatures, footprints, and handprints of popular motion picture personalities from the 1920s to the present day. The Chinese Theatre partnered with IMAX Corporation to create the single largest IMAX auditorium in the world. The new theatre seats 932 people, and hosts the third largest commercial movie screen in North America.   read more…

Theme Week Los Angeles – Hollywood

26 December 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Los Angeles

Universal Studios Globe © Pmlineditor/cc-by-sa-4.0

Universal Studios Globe © Pmlineditor/cc-by-sa-4.0

Hollywood is a neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles. It is notable for its place as the home of the film industry, including several of its historic studios. Its name has come to be a metonym for the motion picture industry of the United States. Hollywood is also a highly ethnically diverse, densely populated, economically diverse neighborhood and retail business district. Hollywood was a small community in 1870 and was incorporated as a municipality in 1903. It officially merged with the city of Los Angeles in 1910, and soon thereafter a prominent film industry began to emerge, eventually becoming the most dominant and recognizable in the world. In 1853, one adobe hut stood in Nopalera (Nopal field), named for the Mexican Nopal cactus indigenous to the area. By 1870, an agricultural community flourished. The area was known as the Cahuenga Valley, after the pass in the Santa Monica Mountains immediately to the north. There are differing opinions as to the true origin of the name “Hollywood.” According to the diary of H. J. Whitley, known as the “Father of Hollywood”, on his honeymoon in 1886 he stood at the top of the hill looking out over the valley. Along came a Chinese man in a wagon carrying wood. The man got out of the wagon and bowed. The Chinese man was asked what he was doing and replied, “I holly-wood”, meaning ‘hauling wood.’ HJ Whitley had an epiphany and decided to name his new town Hollywood. Holly would represent England and wood would represent his Scottish heritage. Whitley had already started over 100 towns across the western United States. The name is also a reference to the Toyon, a native plant with bright red winter berries that resemble holly. Originally the name “Figwood” was to be used to name the area due to the surrounding number of fig trees. The Hollywood Hotel was opened in 1902 by H. J. Whitley, president of the Los Pacific Boulevard and Development Company. Having finally acquired the Hurd ranch and subdivided it, Whitley built the hotel to attract land buyers. Flanking the west side of Highland Avenue, the structure fronted on Prospect Avenue / Hollywood Boulevard, which, still a dusty, unpaved road, was regularly graded and graveled. The hotel was to become internationally known and was the center of the civic and social life and home of the stars for many years. Whitley’s company developed and sold one of the early residential areas, the Ocean View Tract. Whitley did much to promote the area. He paid thousands of dollars for electric lighting, including bringing electricity and building a bank, as well as a road into the Cahuenga Pass. The lighting ran for several blocks down Prospect Avenue. Whitley’s land was centered on Highland Avenue. His 1918 development, Whitley Heights, was named for him.   read more…

Theme Week Los Angeles

21 March 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Los Angeles, Theme Weeks

East Los Angeles Basin, seen from Mulholland © Lan56/cc-by-sa-3.0

East Los Angeles Basin, seen from Mulholland © Lan56/cc-by-sa-3.0

Los Angeles, officially the City of Los Angeles, often known by its initials L.A., is the most populous city in the U.S. state of California and the second-most populous in the United States, after New York City, with a population of 3,9 million. It has a land area of 469 square miles (1,215 km2), and is located in Southern California. The city is the focal point of the larger Los Angeles–Long Beach–Anaheim metropolitan statistical area and Greater Los Angeles Area region, which contain 13 million and over 18 million people in Combined statistical area respectively as of 2010, making it one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. Los Angeles is also the seat of Los Angeles County, the most populated and one of the most ethnically diverse counties in the United States, while the entire Los Angeles area itself has been recognized as the most diverse of the nation’s largest cities. The city’s inhabitants are referred to as Angelenos. Los Angeles hosted the Summer Olympic Games in 1932 and 1984.   read more…

Pink’s Hot Dogs, 72 years in Los Angeles, at the same location

21 January 2012 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Los Angeles

Los Angeles Mayor Hahn and Henry Winkler (the Fonz) © pinkshollywood.com

Los Angeles Mayor Hahn and Henry Winkler (the Fonz) © pinkshollywood.com

Pink’s Hot Dogs is a landmark hot dog restaurant in the Hollywood district of the city of Los Angeles. Pink’s was founded by Paul and Betty Pink in 1939 as a pushcart near the corner of La Brea and Melrose. The Great Depression was still having an impact on the country, and money was scarce. People could purchase a chili dog made with Betty’s own chili recipe accompanied by mustard and onions on a steamed bun for 10 cents each. As business grew, thanks to Betty’s chili and the custom-made Hoffy-brand hot dogs with their natural casings, so did Pink’s. The family built the current building in 1946 at 709 North La Brea.   read more…

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