German Emigration Center in Bremerhaven

October 8th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: European Union, General, Museums, Exhibitions

© PhilippN/cc-by-sa-3.0

© PhilippN/cc-by-sa-3.0

The German Emigration Center (German: Deutsches Auswandererhaus) is a museum located in Bremerhaven, Germany dedicated to the history of German emigration, especially to the United States. It is Europe’s largest theme museum about emigration. Visitors can experience the emigration process through interactive exhibits. The museum also provides access to databases of immigration records. The museum with a area of 4200 square meters opened on August 8, 2005. The design for the museum came from the Hamburg architecture studio Andreas Heller.   read more…

Hotel Adlon in Berlin

October 5th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Berlin, General, Hotels

© Denis Apel/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Denis Apel/cc-by-sa-3.0

The Hotel Adlon Kempinski Berlin is a luxury hotel in Berlin. It is located on Unter den Linden, the main boulevard in the central Mitte district, at the corner with Pariser Platz, directly opposite the Brandenburg Gate. The original Hotel Adlon was one of the most famous hotels in Europe. It opened in 1907 and was largely destroyed in 1945 in the closing days of World War II, though a small wing continued operating until 1984. The current hotel, which opened on August 23, 1997, is a new building with a design inspired by the original.   read more…

Museum of the Ancient Near East in Berlin

September 10th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Berlin, Museums, Exhibitions, UNESCO World Heritage

Ishtar Gate © Hnapel/cc-by-sa-4.0

Ishtar Gate © Hnapel/cc-by-sa-4.0

The Vorderasiatisches Museum (Near East Museum) is an archaeological museum in Berlin. It is in the basement of the south wing of the Pergamon Museum and has one of the world’s largest collections of Southwest Asian art. 14 halls distributed across 2,000 square meters of exhibition surface display southwest Asian culture spanning six millennia. The exhibits cover a period from the 6th millennium BCE into the time of the Muslim conquests. They originate particularly from today’s states of Iraq, Syria and Turkey, with singular finds also from other areas. Starting with the Neolithic finds, the emphasis of the collection is of finds from Sumer, Babylonia and Assyria, as well as northern Syria and eastern Anatolia.   read more…

Berlin Modernism Housing Estates

August 15th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, Berlin, UNESCO World Heritage

Großsiedlung Siemensstadt by Hugo Häring © Doris Antony/cc-by-sa-3.0

Großsiedlung Siemensstadt by Hugo Häring © Doris Antony/cc-by-sa-3.0

Berlin Modernism Housing Estates (German: Siedlungen der Berliner Moderne) are an ensemble of six subsidized housing estates from the early 20th century, listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Dating mainly from the years of the Weimar Republic (1919–1933), when the city of Berlin was particularly progressive socially, politically and culturally, they are outstanding examples of the building reform movement that contributed to improving housing and living conditions for people with low incomes through novel approaches to architecture and urban planning. The estates also provide exceptional examples of new urban and architectural typologies, featuring fresh design solutions, as well as technical and aesthetic innovations.   read more…

Portrait: Hans and Sophie Scholl

July 25th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Portrait

Ludwig Maximilians University Munich - Lichthof © Cfaerber/cc-by-sa-3.0

Ludwig Maximilians University Munich – Lichthof © Cfaerber/cc-by-sa-3.0

Hans and Sophie Scholl, often referred to in German as die Geschwister Scholl (literally: the Scholl siblings), were a brother and sister who were members of the White Rose, a student group in Munich that was active in the non-violent resistance movement in Nazi Germany, especially in distributing flyers against the war and the dictatorship of Adolf Hitler. In post-war Germany, Hans and Sophie Scholl are recognized as symbols of the Christian German resistance movement against the totalitarian Nazi regime.   read more…

Munich Security Conference (MSC)

July 4th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

© securityconference.de

© securityconference.de

The Munich Security Conference (MSC; German: Münchner Sicherheitskonferenz) is an annual conference on international security policy that has taken place in Munich since 1963. Former names are Wehrkundetagung and Münchner Konferenz für Sicherheitspolitik. It is the world’s largest gathering of its kind. Over the past four decades the Munich Security Conference has become the most important independent forum for the exchange of views by international security policy decision-makers. Each year it brings together about 350 senior figures from more than 70 countries around the world to engage in an intensive debate on current and future security challenges.   read more…

Portrait: Albert Schweitzer, a French-German theologian, organist, writer, humanitarian, philosopher, and physician

June 27th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Portrait

© Bundesarchiv/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Bundesarchiv/cc-by-sa-3.0

Albert Schweitzer, OM, was a French-German (Schweitzer was born in the province of Kaysersberg, which changed hands between France and Germany near and during his lifetime. Schweitzer considered himself French and wrote mostly in German. His mother-tongue was Alsatian) theologian, organist, writer, humanitarian, philosopher, and physician. A Lutheran, Schweitzer challenged both the secular view of Jesus as depicted by historical-critical methodology current at this time, as well as the traditional Christian view. His contributions to the interpretation of Pauline Christianity concern the role of Paul‘s mysticism of “being in Christ” as primary and the doctrine of Justification by Faith as secondary. He received the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize for his philosophy of “Reverence for Life”, expressed in many ways, but most famously in founding and sustaining the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, now in Gabon, west central Africa (then French Equatorial Africa). As a music scholar and organist, he studied the music of German composer Johann Sebastian Bach and influenced the Organ Reform Movement (Orgelbewegung).   read more…

German Opera Berlin

May 30th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Berlin, General, Opera Houses, Theaters, Libraries

© Andreas Praefcke/cc-by-3.0

© Andreas Praefcke/cc-by-3.0

The Deutsche Oper Berlin is an opera company located in the Charlottenburg district of Berlin. The resident building is the country’s second largest opera house and also home to the Berlin State Ballet. Since 2004 the Deutsche Oper Berlin, like the Staatsoper Unter den Linden (Berlin State Opera), the Komische Oper Berlin, the Berlin State Ballet, and the Bühnenservice Berlin (Stage and Costume Design), has been a member of the Berlin Opera Foundation.   read more…

Portrait: Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, first winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics

May 23rd, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Portrait

Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen

Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen

Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen was a German mechanical engineer and physicist, who, on 8 November 1895, produced and detected electromagnetic radiation in a wavelength range known as X-rays or Röntgen rays, an achievement that earned him the first Nobel Prize in Physics in 1901. In honour of his accomplishments, in 2004 the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) named element 111, roentgenium, a radioactive element with multiple unstable isotopes, after him.   read more…

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