The White Cliffs of Dover

16 May 2012 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Dover Seafront and Castle © James Armitage

Dover Seafront and Castle © James Armitage

Dover is a town and major ferry port in the home county of Kent, in South East England. It faces France across the narrowest part of the English Channel, and lies south-east of Canterbury; east of Kent’s administrative capital Maidstone; and north-east along the coastline from Dungeness and Hastings. The town is the administrative centre of the Dover District and home of the Dover Calais ferry through the Port of Dover. The surrounding chalk cliffs have become known as the White Cliffs of Dover, and the narrow sea passage nearby – the Strait of Dover. Its strategic position has been evident throughout its history: archaeological finds have revealed that the area has always been a focus for peoples entering and leaving Britain. The name of the town derives from the name of the river that flows through River Dour. The town has been inhabited since the Stone Age according to archeological finds, and Dover is one of only a few places in Britain – London and Cornwall being other examples – to have a corresponding name in the French language, Douvres.   read more…

Carlisle in Cumbria

3 May 2012 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Court Square © geograph.org.uk - David Rogers

Court Square © geograph.org.uk – David Rogers

Carlisle is the county town of Cumbria, and the major settlement of the wider City of Carlisle in North West England. Carlisle is located at the confluence of the rivers Eden, Caldew and Petteril, 10 miles (16 km) south of the Scottish border. It is the largest settlement in the county of Cumbria, and serves as the administrative centre for both Carlisle City Council and Cumbria County Council. At the time of the 2001 census, the population of Carlisle was 71,773, with 100,734 living in the wider city.   read more…

Newcastle upon Tyne

23 April 2012 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Grey's Monument © Hans Peter Schaefer - www.reserv-a-rt.de

Grey’s Monument © Hans Peter Schaefer – www.reserv-a-rt.de

Newcastle upon Tyne is a city and metropolitan borough of Tyne and Wear, in North East England. Historically a part of Northumberland, it is situated on the north bank of the River Tyne. The city developed in the area that was the location of the Roman settlement called Pons Aelius, though it owes its name to the castle built in 1080, by Robert II, Duke of Normandy, the eldest son of William the Conqueror. The city grew as an important centre for the wool trade and it later became a major coal mining area. The port developed in the 16th century and, along with the shipyards lower down the river, was amongst the world’s largest shipbuilding and ship-repairing centres. These industries have since experienced severe decline and closure, and the city today is largely a business and cultural centre, with a particular reputation for nightlife.   read more…

The World Heritage Site of Durham

14 April 2012 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks, UNESCO World Heritage

Durham Market Place © Bladeofgrass

Durham Market Place © Bladeofgrass

Durham is a city in north east England. It is within the County Durham local government district, and is the county town of the larger ceremonial county. It lies to the south of Newcastle upon Tyne, Chester-le-Street and Sunderland and to the north of Darlington.   read more…

The seaside resort of Southend-on-Sea

9 April 2012 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

End of the Southend Pier © geograph.org.uk - Julieanne Savage

End of the Southend Pier © geograph.org.uk – Julieanne Savage

Southend-on-Sea is a unitary authority area, town, and seaside resort in Essex, England. The district has Borough status, and comprises the towns of Chalkwell, Eastwood, Leigh-on-Sea, North Shoebury, Prittlewell, Shoeburyness, Southchurch, Thorpe Bay, and Westcliff-on-Sea. The district is situated within the Thames Gateway on the north side of the Thames estuary 40 miles (64 km) east of central London. It is bordered to the north by Rochford and to the west by Castle Point. It is home to the longest leisure pier in the world, The Southend Pier.   read more…

Nottingham and Robin Hood

30 March 2012 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Nottingham Montage © PawełMM

Nottingham Montage © PawełMM

Nottingham is a city and unitary authority in the East Midlands of England. It is located in the ceremonial county of Nottinghamshire and represents one of eight members of the English Core Cities Group. Whilst Nottingham has always had a tightly-drawn boundary (accounting for its relatively small population of 307,000), Nottingham’s Urban Area has a population of approximately 806,000; it is the seventh largest urban conurbation in the United Kingdom, ranking between those of Liverpool and Sheffield, and the largest in the East Midlands. Eurostat’s concept of the Larger Urban Zone listed the area’s population at 825,600 as of 2004.   read more…

The Kensington Palace

20 March 2012 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks

Kensington Palace © Arnoprepa

Kensington Palace © Arnoprepa

Kensington Palace is a royal residence set in Kensington Gardens in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London. It has been a residence of the British Royal Family since the 17th century and is the official London residence of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester and Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, while the Duke and Duchess of Kent reside at Wren House. Kensington Palace is also used on an unofficial basis by Prince Harry, as well as his cousin Zara Phillips.   read more…

The city of Milton Keynes

14 March 2012 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Milton Keynes Montage © Tom walker

Milton Keynes Montage © Tom walker

Milton Keynes, sometimes abbreviated MK, is a large town in Buckinghamshire, in the south east of England, about 49 miles (79 km) north-west of London. It is the administrative centre of the Borough of Milton Keynes. It was formally designated as a new town on 23 January 1967, with the design brief to become a ‘city’ in scale.   read more…

Sandringham House on the Royal Sandringham Estate

10 March 2012 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks

Sandringham House © geograph.org.uk - Elwyn Thomas Roddick

Sandringham House © geograph.org.uk – Elwyn Thomas Roddick

Sandringham House is a country house on 8,000 hectares (20,000 acres) of land near the village of Sandringham in Norfolk, England. The house is privately owned by the British Royal Family and is located on the royal Sandringham Estate, which lies within the Norfolk Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The house was first opened to the public in 1977, and there is a museum with displays of Royal life and Estate history. About 600 acres (240 ha) are a country park, open to the public. Other buildings on the estate are York Cottage and Anmer Hall.   read more…

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