Tower Hill in London

30 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London

Tower Hill and Tower of London © flickr.com - Sheri/cc-by-sa-2.0

Tower Hill and Tower of London © flickr.com – Sheri/cc-by-sa-2.0

Tower Hill is a complex city or garden square northwest of the Tower of London, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets just outside the City of London boundary yet inside what remains of the London Wall – a large fragment of which survives toward its east.   read more…

Temple Church in London

2 May 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London

© geograph.org.uk - John Salmon/cc-by-sa-2.0

© geograph.org.uk – John Salmon/cc-by-sa-2.0

The Temple Church is a late 12th-century church in the City of London located between Fleet Street and the River Thames, built by the Knights Templar as their English headquarters. During the reign of King John (1199–1216) it served as the royal treasury, supported by the role of the Knights Templars as proto-international bankers. It is jointly owned by the Inner Temple and Middle Temple Inns of Court, bases of the English legal profession. It is famous for being a round church, a common design feature for Knights Templar churches, and for its 13th and 14th century stone effigies. It was heavily damaged by German bombing during World War II and has since been greatly restored and rebuilt. The area around the Temple Church is known as the Temple and nearby formerly in the middle of Fleet Street stood the Temple Bar, an ornamental processional gateway. Nearby is the Temple Underground station.   read more…

20 Fenchurch Street

1 October 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month, London

Tower Bridge and 20 Fenchurch Street © mattbuck/cc-by-sa-4.0

Tower Bridge and 20 Fenchurch Street © mattbuck/cc-by-sa-4.0

20 Fenchurch Street is a commercial skyscraper in London that takes its name from its address on Fenchurch Street, in the historic City of London financial district. It has been nicknamed ‘The Walkie-Talkie’ because of its distinctive shape. Construction was completed in spring 2014, and the top-floor ‘sky garden’ was opened in January 2015. The 34-storey building is 160 m (525 ft) tall, making it the fifth-tallest building in the City of London and the 13th tallest in London. Designed by architect Rafael Viñoly and costing over £200 million, 20 Fenchurch Street features a highly distinctive top-heavy form which appears to burst upward and outward. A large viewing deck, bar and restaurants are included on the top three floors; these are, with restrictions, open to the public.   read more…

St Paul’s Cathedral in London

20 June 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London, Museums, Exhibitions

© flickr.com - Mark Fosh/cc-by-2.0

© flickr.com – Mark Fosh/cc-by-2.0

St Paul’s Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits at the top of Ludgate Hill, the highest point in the City of London. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604. The present church, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed within Wren’s lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme which took place in the city after the Great Fire of London. The cathedral is one of the most famous and most recognisable sights of London, with its dome, framed by the spires of Wren’s City churches, dominating the skyline for 300 years. At 365 feet (111 m) high, it was the tallest building in London from 1710 to 1962, and its dome is also among the highest in the world. In terms of area, St Paul’s is the second largest church building in the United Kingdom after Liverpool Cathedral.   read more…

Lloyd’s building in London

20 August 2014 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London

© geograph.org.uk - Oast House Archive/cc-by-sa-2.0

© geograph.org.uk – Oast House Archive/cc-by-sa-2.0

The Lloyd’s building (sometimes known as the Inside-Out Building) is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd’s of London. It is located on the former site of East India House in 1 Lime Street, in London’s main financial district, the City of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior. The Lloyd’s building is 88 metres (289 ft) to the roof, with 14 floors. On top of each service core stand the cleaning cranes, increasing the overall height to 95.10 metres (312 ft). Modular in plan, each floor can be altered by addition or removal of partitions and walls.   read more…

30 St Mary Axe in the City of London

1 March 2014 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month, London

© flickr.com - Edward Simpson/cc-by-sa-2.0

© flickr.com – Edward Simpson/cc-by-sa-2.0

30 St Mary Axe, widely known informally as “the Gherkin” and previously the Swiss Re Building, is a skyscraper in London’s main financial district, the City of London, completed in December 2003 and opened in April 2004. With 41 floors, the tower is 180 metres (591 ft) tall and stands on a street called St Mary Axe, on the site of the former Baltic Exchange, which was extensively damaged in 1992 by the explosion of a bomb placed by the Provisional IRA.   read more…

The London Stone

6 July 2013 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London

London Stone © englishhistoryauthors.blogspot.com

London Stone © englishhistoryauthors.blogspot.com

London Stone is a historic stone that is now set within a Portland stone surround and iron grille on Cannon Street, in the City of London.   read more…

Theme Week London – City of London

12 April 2011 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, General, London, UNESCO World Heritage

City of London skyline © David Iliff

City of London skyline © David Iliff

The City of London is a small area within Greater London, England. It is the historic core of London around which the modern conurbation grew and has held city status since time immemorial. The City’s boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, and it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of London, though remains a notable part of central London. It is often referred to as the City (often written on maps as “City”) or the Square Mile, as it is just over one square mile (1.12 sq mi/2.90 km2) in area. These terms are also often used as metonyms for the United Kingdom’s financial services industry, which has historically been based here. In the medieval period, the City was the full extent of London. The term London now refers to a much larger conurbation roughly corresponding to Greater London, a local government area which includes 32 London boroughs as well as the City of London. The local authority for the City, the City of London Corporation, is unique in the United Kingdom, and has some unusual responsibilities for a local authority in Britain, such as being the police authority for the City. It also has responsibilities and ownerships beyond the City’s boundaries. The Corporation is headed by the Lord Mayor of the City of London, an office separate from (and much older than) the Mayor of London.   read more…

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