West Village in Manhattan

Wednesday, 31 May 2017 - 11:00 am (CET/MEZ) Berlin | Author/Destination:
Category/Kategorie: General, New York City
Reading Time:  11 minutes

West Village © flickr.com - heathbrandon/cc-by-sa-2.0

West Village © flickr.com – heathbrandon/cc-by-sa-2.0

The West Village is a neighborhood in Manhattan in New York City. Largely thought to constitute the western portion of the larger Greenwich Village neighborhood within Lower Manhattan, the area is roughly bounded by the Hudson River on the west and Sixth Avenue on the east, extending from West 14th Street south to West Houston Street. The Far West Village extends from the Hudson River to Hudson Street. Bordering neighborhoods are Chelsea to the north, Hudson Square – officially designated in 2009 – and the South Village to the south, and the East Village to the east. The neighborhood is primarily residential, with a multitude of small restaurants, shops, and services. Residential property sale prices in the West Village neighborhood are some of the most expensive in the United States, typically exceeding US$2,000 per square foot ($22,000/m²) in 2016. The neighborhood is distinguished by streets that are “off the grid”, being set at an angle to the other streets in Manhattan. These roads were laid out in an 18th-century grid plan, approximately parallel or perpendicular to the Hudson, long before the Commissioners’ Plan of 1811 which created the main street grid plan for later parts of the city. Even streets that were given numbers in the 19th century to make them nominally part of the grid can be idiosyncratic, at best. West 4th Street, formerly Asylum Street, crosses West 10th, 11th and 12th Streets, ending at an intersection with West 13th Street. Heading north on Greenwich Street, West 12th Street is separated by three blocks from Little West 12th Street, which in turn is one block south of West 13th Street. Further, some of the smaller east-west residential streets are paved with setts (often confused with cobblestones), particularly in Far West Village and the Meatpacking District. This grid is prevalent through the rest of Greenwich Village as well. Beginning in the early 1980s, residential development spread in the Far West Village between West and Hudson Streets, from West 14th to West Houston Streets, resulting in the area being given its own name.

Historically, local residents and preservation groups have been concerned about development in the Village and have fought to preserve the architectural and historic integrity of the neighborhood. More than 50 blocks of West Village, bordered on the north by 14th Street, is part of a Historic District established by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. The District’s convoluted borders run no farther south than 4th Street or St. Luke’s Place, and no farther east than Washington Square East or University Place. Redevelopment in this area is severely restricted, and developers must preserve the main facade and aesthetics of the buildings even during renovation. This district—which was, for four decades, the city’s largest—was created in 1969 by the then-four-year-old New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. However, preservationists advocated for the entire neighborhood to be designated an historic district; although it covers most of the West Village, the blocks closest to the Hudson River are excluded.

Stonewall Inn © Rhododendrites/cc-by-sa-4.0 Perry Street © Jim.henderson © Beyond My Ken/cc-by-sa-4.0 Cherry Lane Theatre © GK tramrunner229/cc-by-sa-3.0 West Village © flickr.com - heathbrandon/cc-by-sa-2.0 Jefferson Market Library © Beyond My Ken/cc-by-sa-4.0
<
>
West Village © flickr.com - heathbrandon/cc-by-sa-2.0
Advocates continued to pursue their goal of additional designation, spurred in particular by the increased pace of development in the 1990s. The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (GVSHP), a nonprofit organization dedicated to the architectural and cultural character and heritage of the neighborhood, successfully proposed new districts and individual landmarks to the LPC. Those include:

  • Gansevoort Market Historic District was the first new historic district in Greenwich Village in 34 years. The 112 buildings on 11 blocks protect the city’s distinctive Meatpacking District with its cobblestone streets, warehouses and rowhouses. About 70 percent of the area proposed by GVSHP in 2000 was designated a historic district by the LPC in 2003, while the entire area was listed on the State and National Registers of Historic Places in 2007.
  • Weehawken Street Historic District, designated in 2006, is a 14-building, three-block district near the Hudson River centering on tiny Weehawken Street and containing an array of architecture including a sailor’s hotel, former stables, and a wooden house.
  • Greenwich Village Historic District Extension I, designated in 2006, brought 46 more buildings on three blocks into the district, thus protecting warehouses, a former public school and police station, and early 19th-century rowhouses. Both the Weehawken Street Historic District and the Greenwich Village Historic District Extension I were designated by the LPC in response to the larger proposal for a Far West Village Historic District submitted by GVSHP in 2004. The Landmarks Preservation Commission also designated as landmarks several individual sites proposed by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, including the former Bell Telephone Labs Complex (1861–1963), now Westbeth Artists Community, designated in 2011; and houses at 159 Charles Street and 354 W. 11th Street, as well as the Keller Hotel, all in 2007.

In addition, several contextual rezonings were enacted in Greenwich Village in recent years to limit the size and height of allowable new development in the neighborhood, and to encourage the preservation of existing buildings. The following were proposed by the GVSHP and passed by the City Planning Commission:

  • Far West Village Rezoning, approved in 2005, was the first downzoning in Manhattan in many years, putting in place new height caps, thus ending construction of high-rise waterfront towers in much of the Village and encouraging the reuse of existing buildings.
  • Washington and Greenwich Street Rezoning, approved in 2010, was passed in near-record time to protect six blocks from out-of-scale hotel development and maintain the low-rise character.

The West Village historically was known as an important landmark on the map of American bohemian culture in the early and mid-twentieth century. The neighborhood was known for its colorful, artistic residents and the alternative culture they propagated. Due in part to the progressive attitudes of many of its residents, the Village was a focal point of new movements and ideas, whether political, artistic, or cultural. This tradition as an enclave of avant-garde and alternative culture was established during the 19th century and into the 20th century, when small presses, art galleries, and experimental theater thrived. Known as “Little Bohemia” starting in 1916, West Village is in some ways the center of the bohemian lifestyle on the West Side, with classic artists’ lofts in the form of the Westbeth Artists Community and Julian Schnabel‘s Palazzo Chupi. It is also the site of sleek new residential towers designed by American architect Richard Meier facing the Hudson River at 173/176 Perry Street. Points of interest are:

Read more on TimeOut.com – West Village and Wikipedia West Village (Smart Traveler App by U.S. Department of State - Weather report by weather.com - Global Passport Power Rank - Travel Risk Map - Democracy Index - GDP according to IMF, UN, and World Bank - Global Competitiveness Report - Corruption Perceptions Index - Press Freedom Index - World Justice Project - Rule of Law Index - UN Human Development Index - Global Peace Index - Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Index). Photos by Wikimedia Commons. If you have a suggestion, critique, review or comment to this blog entry, we are looking forward to receive your e-mail at comment@wingsch.net. Please name the headline of the blog post to which your e-mail refers to in the subject line.




Recommended posts:

Share this post: (Please note data protection regulations before using buttons)

Lagos City in Nigeria

Lagos City in Nigeria

[caption id="attachment_239082" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Sunset at Landmark Beach © Kwadoskii/cc-by-sa-4.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Lagos (Yoruba: Èkó) or Lagos City is the most populous city in Nigeria, with an estimated population of 21 million in 2015. Lagos is the most populous urban area in Africa. Lagos was the national capital of Nigeria until December 1991 following the government's decision to move their capital to Abuja in the centre of the country. Lagos is a major African financial centre and is the econo...

[ read more ]

The Nibelungen and Luther City of Worms

The Nibelungen and Luther City of Worms

[caption id="attachment_160789" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Nibelungen Bridge over Rhine river © Heidas[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Worms is a city in Rhineland-Palatinate on the Rhine River with 82,000 inhabitants. The climate in the Rhine River Valley is very temperate in the winter time and quite enjoyable in the summertime. Rainfall is below average for the surrounding areas. Snow accumulation in the winter is very low and often melts within a short period of time. Established by the Celts, who called it Borbetom...

[ read more ]

Theme Week New York City - National September 11 Memorial and Museum

Theme Week New York City - National September 11 Memorial and Museum

[caption id="attachment_26620" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © Cadiomals/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The National September 11 Memorial & Museum is the principal memorial and museum, respectively, commemorating the September 11 attacks of 2001 (which killed 2,977 people) and the World Trade Center bombing of 1993 (which killed six). The memorial is located at the World Trade Center site, the former location of the Twin Towers (which were destroyed during the attacks). It is operated by a non-profit corporation, he...

[ read more ]

Carnegie Hall in New York

Carnegie Hall in New York

[caption id="attachment_163153" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © Martin Dürrschnabel/cc-by-sa-2.5[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park. Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music ...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Brunei - Brunei Bay

Theme Week Brunei - Brunei Bay

[caption id="attachment_219891" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Panorama of Bandar Seri Begawan, 2018 © Zulfadli51/cc-by-sa-4.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Brunei Bay is on the northwestern coast of Borneo island, in Brunei and Malaysia. Brunei Bay is located east of Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei. It is the ocean gateway to the isolated Temburong District of Brunei, separated from the rest of Brunei by the Malaysian Sarawak State surrounding it to the bay. A 30-kilometre (19 mi) roadway connecting the Muara and Temburong d...

[ read more ]

Chablis in Burgundy

Chablis in Burgundy

[caption id="attachment_153791" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Porte Noël © Daniel CULSAN/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Chablis is a town and commune in the Yonne department in Burgundy in north-central France. It lies in the valley of the River Serein and has a population of 2,300 inhabitants. Each year the Festival du Chablisien is held May to June in Chablis, featuring classical, jazz, and world music. Chablis lies about 10 miles (16 km) east of Auxerre, situated in Burgundy's heartland roughly halfway be...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Ticino

Theme Week Ticino

[caption id="attachment_230797" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Bay of Lugano © SamuelFerrara/cc-by-sa-4.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Ticino, sometimes Tessin, officially the Republic and Canton of Ticino or less formally the Canton of Ticino, is one of the 26 cantons forming the Swiss Confederation. It is composed of eight districts and its capital city is Bellinzona. It is also traditionally divided into the Sopraceneri and the Sottoceneri, respectively north and south of Monte Ceneri. Red and blue are the colours of its flag...

[ read more ]

Duke University in North Carolina

Duke University in North Carolina

[caption id="attachment_241051" align="aligncenter" width="590"] James Buchanan Duke statue by Charles Keck with chapel in the background © Charles Keck[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Duke University is a private research university in Durham, North Carolina, United States. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day city of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. In 1924, tobacco and electric power industrialist James Buchanan Duke established The Duke Endowment and the institution changed its name to honor hi...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Swiss - St. Gallen, gate to Appenzellerland

Theme Week Swiss - St. Gallen, gate to Appenzellerland

[caption id="attachment_154197" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Housing in the Abby quarter © Filzstift[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]St. Gallen is the capital of the canton of St. Gallen in Switzerland. It evolved from the hermitage of Saint Gall, founded in the 7th century. Today, it is a large urban agglomeration (with around 160,000 inhabitants) and represents the center of eastern Switzerland. The town mainly relies on services for its economic base. The main tourist attraction is the Abbey of St. Gall, a UNESCO World Heritag...

[ read more ]

Si Racha in Thailand

Si Racha in Thailand

[caption id="attachment_235625" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Central Si Racha © Centralpattana2022/cc-by-sa-4.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Si Racha is a subdistrict and town in Thailand on the east coast of the Gulf of Thailand, about 120 km southeast of Bangkok in Si Racha district, Chonburi province. Si Racha is in the industrial Eastern Seaboard zone, along with Pattaya, Laem Chabang, and Chonburi. Si Racha is known as the provenance of the popular hot sauce, Sriracha, which is named after the town. Si Racha used ...

[ read more ]

Return to TopReturn to Top
Xianglu Bay © Shasha Zhuhai/cc-by-sa-4.0
Zhuhai in South China

Zhuhai (literally: "Pearl Sea") is a prefecture-level city on the southern coast of Guangdong province in China. Located in the...

Giza on the Nile © Faris knight/cc-by-sa-4.0
Theme Week Egypt – Giza

Giza is the third-largest city in Egypt. It is located on the west bank of the Nile, 5 km (3...

Temple of Isis on Philae © Steve F-E-Cameron/cc-by-sa-3.0
Theme Week Egypt – Aswan

Aswan, formerly spelled Assuan, is a city in the south of Egypt, the capital of the Aswan Governorate. Aswan is...

Close