Theme Week Rome – Vatican City

Thursday, 3 September 2015 - 06:37 pm (CET/MEZ) Berlin | Author/Destination:
Category/Kategorie: General, Museums, Exhibitions, UNESCO World Heritage

Vatican City State Panorama from St. Peters Basilica © Marcus Winter

Vatican City State Panorama from St. Peters Basilica © Marcus Winter

Vatican City is a landlocked sovereign city-state whose territory consists of a walled enclave within the city of Rome, Italy. It has an area of approximately 44 hectares (110 acres), and a population of just over 800. The Vatican City is the world’s smallest state, being only around 44 ha (110 acres). In July 2007, the Vatican agreed to become the first carbon neutral state. They plan to accomplish this by offsetting carbon dioxide emissions with the creation of a Vatican Climate Forest in Hungary. Vatican City was established in 1929 by the Lateran Treaty, signed by Cardinal Secretary of State Pietro Gasparri, on behalf of the Holy See and by Prime Minister Benito Mussolini on behalf of the Kingdom of Italy. Vatican City State is distinct from the Holy See, which dates back to early Christianity and is the main episcopal see of 1.2 billion Latin and Eastern Catholic adherents around the globe. Ordinances of Vatican City are published in Italian; official documents of the Holy See are issued mainly in Latin. The two entities have distinct passports: the Holy See, not being a country, issues only diplomatic and service passports, whereas Vatican City State issues normal passports. In each case very few passports are issued.

The Lateran Treaty in 1929, which brought the city-state into existence, spoke of it as a new creation (Preamble and Article III), not as a vestige of the much larger Papal States (756–1870) that had previously encompassed much of central Italy. Most of this territory was absorbed into the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, and the final portion, namely the city of Rome with Lazio, ten years later, in 1870.

Vatican City is an ecclesiastical or sacerdotal-monarchical state, ruled by the Bishop of Rome – the Pope. The highest state functionaries are all Catholic clergymen of various national origins. It is the sovereign territory of the Holy See (Sancta Sedes) and the location of the Pope’s residence, referred to as the Apostolic Palace.

The Popes have generally resided in the area that in 1929 became Vatican City since the return from Avignon in 1377, but have also at times resided in the Quirinal Palace in Rome and elsewhere. Previously, they resided in the Lateran Palace on the Caelian Hill on the far side of Rome from the Vatican. Emperor Constantine gave this site to Pope Miltiades in 313. The signing of the agreements that established the new state took place in the latter building, giving rise to the name of Lateran Pacts, by which they are known.

Fountain of Carlo Maderno on Piazza San Pietro © Matthias Kabel Vatican Palace © flickr.com - tieseb St Peter's Square © Greg O'Beirne St Peter's Square © David Iliff Fountain of Carlo Fontana on Piazza San Pietro © Matthias Kabel St Peter's Square © François Malan From Castel Sant'Angelo toward Vatican City © Reichsfurst Dome of Saint Peter and the Colonades © Johann Kleindl Vatican City map © Francesco PIRANEO G Vatican City State Panorama from St. Peters Basilica © Marcus Winter
<
>
Vatican City State Panorama from St. Peters Basilica © Marcus Winter
Within the territory of Vatican City are the Vatican Gardens (Italian: Giardini Vaticani), which account for more than half of this territory. The gardens, established during the Renaissance and Baroque era, are decorated with fountains and sculptures. The gardens cover approximately 23 hectares (57 acres) which is most of the Vatican Hill. The highest point is 60 metres (200 ft) above mean sea level. Stone walls bound the area in the North, South and West. The gardens date back to medieval times when orchards and vineyards extended to the north of the Papal Apostolic Palace. In 1279 Pope Nicholas III (Giovanni Gaetano Orsini, 1277–1280) moved his residence back to the Vatican from the Lateran Palace and enclosed this area with walls. He planted an orchard (pomerium), a lawn (pratellum) and a garden (viridarium).

The Vatican City State budget includes the Vatican museums and post office and is supported financially by the sale of stamps, coins, medals and tourist mementos; by fees for admission to museums; and by publications sales. The incomes and living standards of lay workers are comparable to those of counterparts who work in the city of Rome. Other industries include printing, the production of mosaics, and the manufacture of staff uniforms.

The Vatican also conducts worldwide financial activities, having its own bank, Istituto per le Opere di Religione (also known as the Vatican Bank, and with the acronym IOR). This bank has an ATM with instructions in Latin, possibly the only such ATM in the world.

The Vatican Library and the collections of the Vatican Museums are of the highest historical, scientific and cultural importance. In 1984, the Vatican was added by UNESCO to the List of World Heritage Sites; it is the only one to consist of an entire state.

Here you can find the complete Overview of all Theme Weeks.

Read more on Vatican, Vatican City, Virtual Tour through Sistine Chapel, St. Peter’s Basilica and Wikipedia Vatican City. Learn more about the use of photos. To inform you about latest news most of the city, town or tourism websites offer a newsletter service and/or operate Facebook pages/Twitter accounts. In addition more and more destinations, tourist organisations and cultural institutions offer Apps for your Smart Phone or Tablet, to provide you with a mobile tourist guide (Smart Traveler App by U.S. Department of State - Weather report by weather.com). If you have a suggestion, critique, review or comment to this blog entry, we are looking forward to receive your e-mail at comment@wingsch.net. Please name the headline of the blog post to which your e-mail refers to in the subject line.




Recommended posts:

Share this post: (Please note data protection regulations before using buttons)

Westminster Abbey in London

Westminster Abbey in London

[caption id="attachment_183103" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Big Ben and Westminster Abbey, seen from London Eye © Tebbetts[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, England, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the United Kingdom's most notable religious buildings and the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs...

[ read more ]

Porto, capital of the north

Porto, capital of the north

[caption id="attachment_150998" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Ribeira © Georges Jansoone[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Porto, also known as Oporto in English, is the second largest city in Portugal and one of the major urban areas in the Iberian Peninsula. Its administrative limits includes a population of 237,559 inhabitants distributed within 15 civil parishes. The urbanized area of Porto, which extends beyond the administrative limits of the city, has a population of 1.2 million in an area of 389 km2 (150 sq mi), making it th...

[ read more ]

The International Criminal Court

The International Criminal Court

[caption id="attachment_168238" align="aligncenter" width="590"] International Criminal Court building © OSeveno/cc-by-sa-4.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The International Criminal Court (ICC or ICCt) is an intergovernmental organization and international tribunal that sits in The Hague in the Netherlands. The ICC has the jurisdiction to prosecute individuals for the international crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. The ICC is intended to complement existing national judicial systems and it may therefore ...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Panama - Penonomé

Theme Week Panama - Penonomé

[caption id="attachment_168506" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Saint John the Baptist Church © flickr.com - Anelly Celis/cc-by-2.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Penonomé is the capital of the province of Coclé with a populaton of 20,000. The town is located along the Inter-American Highway in the wide, flat lowlands of central Coclé. Especially for Carnival and the national festivals, the otherwise quiet city turns into a colorful spectacle with numerous open-air discos and lively street parades. Penonomé was founded ...

[ read more ]

Bad Honnef, the Nice on the Rhine

Bad Honnef, the Nice on the Rhine

[caption id="attachment_160431" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Bad Honnef seen from Rolandseck © Leit[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Bad Honnef is a spa town in Germany near Bonn in the Rhein-Sieg district, North Rhine-Westphalia. It is located on the border of the neighbouring state Rhineland-Palatinate. To the north it lies on the slopes of the Drachenfels ("Dragons's Rock") mountain, part of the Siebengebirge. Bad Honnef is home to a mineral spring called the Drachenquelle ("Dragon Spring") which was discovered in 1897....

[ read more ]

Theme Week Gascony

Theme Week Gascony

[caption id="attachment_151937" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Château de Castelmore in Lupiac, birthplace of Comte d’Artagnan © Jibi44/cc-by-2.5[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Gascony is an area of southwest France that was part of the "Province of Guyenne and Gascony" prior to the French Revolution. The region is vaguely defined and the distinction between Guyenne and Gascony is unclear; sometimes they are considered to overlap, and sometimes Gascony is considered a part of Guyenne. Most definitions put Gascony east and south...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Munich - Oktoberfest

Theme Week Munich - Oktoberfest

[caption id="attachment_153429" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Bavaria Statue © Hullbr3ach[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Oktoberfest is a 16-18 day festival held each year in Munich, Bavaria, Germany, running from late September to the first weekend in October. It is one of the most famous events in Germany and the world's largest fair, with more than 5 million people attending every year. The Oktoberfest is an important part of Bavarian culture. Other cities across the world also hold Oktoberfest celebrations, modeled after the ...

[ read more ]

Scarborough, holidays on the North Sea coast

Scarborough, holidays on the North Sea coast

[caption id="attachment_153847" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Scarborough Castle © Immanuel Giel[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Scarborough is a town on the North Sea coast of North Yorkshire in England, within the borough of the same name. Historically part of the North Riding of Yorkshire, the modern town lies between 10-230 feet (3-70 m) above sea level, rising steeply northward and westward from the harbour onto limestone cliffs. The older part of the town lies around the harbour and is protected by a rocky headland. It is on...

[ read more ]

Reykjavík, capital of Iceland

Reykjavík, capital of Iceland

[caption id="attachment_154151" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Reykjavík from Hallgrímskirkja (church) © Jóhann Heiðar Árnason[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Reykjavík is the capital and largest city of Iceland. Its latitude at 64°08' N makes it the world's northernmost capital of a sovereign state. It is located in southwestern Iceland, on the southern shore of Faxaflói Bay. With a population of around 120,000 (and over 200,000 in the Greater Reykjavík Area) it is the heart of Iceland's economic, cultural and governmenta...

[ read more ]

The port city of Port Said

The port city of Port Said

[caption id="attachment_153663" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Building of Suez Canal Authority © Abdelrhman 1990[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Port Said is a city that lies in north east Egypt extending about 30 kilometres (19 mi) along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, north of the Suez Canal, with an approximate population of 604,000. The city was established in 1859 during the building of the Suez Canal. Port Said has been ranked the first among the Egyptian cities according to the Human Development Index in 2009 an...

[ read more ]

Return to Top ▲Return to Top ▲
© Ignaz Wiradi/cc-by-sa-3.0
The Titisee in the Black Forest

Titisee is a lake in the southern Black Forest in Baden-Württemberg. It is said it got its name from Roman...

Songdo International City © Swlee8851/cc-by-sa-3.0
Songdo International Business District in South Korea

Songdo International Business District (Songdo IBD) is a new smart city or "ubiquitous city" built from scratch on 600 hectares...

Ankify Lodge (Dauphin Bleu) © Rvdb2
Madagascar in the Indian Ocean

Madagascar is an island country in the Indian Ocean, off the southeastern coast of Africa. The nation comprises the island...

Schließen