Theme Week Moldova

Monday, 26 October 2020 - 12:00 pm (CET/MEZ) Berlin | Author/Destination:
Category/Kategorie: General, Theme Weeks, UNESCO World Heritage

National Enoteca at Cricova © Cepaev/cc-by-sa-3.0

National Enoteca at Cricova © Cepaev/cc-by-sa-3.0

Moldova, officially the Republic of Moldova, is a landlocked country in Eastern Europe. It is bordered by Romania to the west and Ukraine to the north, east, and south. The capital city is Chișinău (List of cities and towns in Moldova). Due to a decrease in industrial and agricultural output following the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the service sector has grown to dominate Moldova’s economy and is over 60% of the nation’s GDP. It is the poorest country in Europe by GDP per capita, and it has the lowest Human Development Index in the continent.

In 1940, as a consequence of the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, Romania was compelled to cede Bessarabia and Northern Bukovina to the Soviet Union, leading to the creation of the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic (Moldavian SSR), which included the greater part of Bessarabia and the westernmost strip of the former MASSR (east of the Dniester River). On 27 August 1991, as the dissolution of the Soviet Union was underway, the Moldavian SSR declared independence and took the name Moldova. The constitution of Moldova was adopted in 1994. The strip of the Moldovan territory on the east bank of the Dniester has been under the de facto control of the breakaway government of Transnistria since 1990. Transnistria, which is held hostage by Putin’s Russia, like the Ukrainian Crimea and eastern Ukraine, of course still belongs to Moldova.

In 2005, Moldova and the EU established an action plan that sought to improve collaboration between its two neighbouring countries, Romania and Ukraine. At the end of 2005 EUBAM, the European Union Border Assistance Mission to Moldova and Ukraine, was established at the joint request of the presidents of Moldova and Ukraine. EUBAM assists the Moldovan and Ukrainian governments in approximating their border and customs procedures to EU standards and offers support in both countries’ fight against cross-border crime. After the 1990–1992 War of Transnistria, Moldova sought a peaceful resolution to the conflict in the Transnistria region by working with Romania, Ukraine, and Russia, calling for international mediation, and co-operating with the OSCE and UN fact-finding and observer missions. The foreign minister of Moldova, Andrei Stratan, repeatedly stated that the Russian troops stationed in the breakaway region were there against the will of the Moldovan government and called on them to leave “completely and unconditionally”. In 2012, a security zone incident resulted in the death of a civilian, raising tensions with Russia. In September 2010, the European Parliament approved a grant of €90 million to Moldova. The money was to supplement US$570 million in International Monetary Fund loans, World Bank and other bilateral support already granted to Moldova. In April 2010, Romania offered Moldova development aid worth of €100 million while the number of scholarships for Moldovan students doubled to 5,000. According to a lending agreement signed in February 2010, Poland provided US$15 million as a component of its support for Moldova in its European integration efforts. The first joint meeting of the Governments of Romania and Moldova, held in March 2012, concluded with several bilateral agreements in various fields. The European orientation “has been the policy of Moldova in recent years and this is the policy that must continue,” Nicolae Timofti told lawmakers before his election. On 29 November 2013, at a summit in Vilnius, Moldova signed an association agreement with the European Union dedicated to the European Union’s ‘Eastern Partnership‘ with ex-Soviet countries. The ex-Romanian President Traian Băsescu stated that Romania will make all efforts for Moldova to join the EU as soon as possible. Likewise, Traian Băsescu declared that the unification of Moldova with Romania is the next national project for Romania, as more than 75% of the population speaks Romanian. Moldova has signed the Association Agreement with the European Union in Brussels on 27 June 2014. The signing comes after the accord has been initialed in Vilnius in November 2013.

Parliament Building in Chișinău © Pudelek/cc-by-sa-4.0 Rîbnița © flickr.com - Guttorm Flatabø/cc-by-2.0 Tiraspol, Moldova's second largest city © flickr.com - Eugene Romanenko/cc-by-2.0 Chișinău © Zserghei Mileştii Mici, the world's largest wine cellars © flickr.com - Dave Proffer/cc-by-2.0 National Enoteca at Cricova © Cepaev/cc-by-sa-3.0
<
>
Mileştii Mici, the world's largest wine cellars © flickr.com - Dave Proffer/cc-by-2.0
Moldova’s cultural tradition has been influenced primarily by the Romanian origins of its majority population, the roots of which go back to the 2nd century AD, the period of Roman colonization in Dacia. Located geographically at the crossroads of Latin, Slavic and other cultures, Moldova has enriched its own culture adopting and maintaining traditions of neighbouring regions and of other influential sources. The largest ethnic group, which had come to identify itself widely as “Moldovan” by the 14th century, played a significant role in the shaping of classical Romanian culture. The culture has been also influenced by the Byzantine culture, the neighbouring Magyar and Slavic populations, and later by the Ottoman Turks. A strong Western European influence in Moldovan literature and arts was prevalent in the 19th century. During the periods 1812-1917 and 1944–89, Moldovans were influenced by Russian and Soviet administrative control as well and by ethnic Russian immigration. The country’s cultural heritage was marked by numerous churches and monasteries built by the Moldavian ruler Stephen the Great in the 15th century, by the works of the later renaissance Metropolitans Varlaam and Dosoftei, and those of scholars such as Grigore Ureche, Miron Costin, Nicolae Milescu, Dimitrie Cantemir and Ion Neculce. In the 19th century, Moldavians from the territories of the medieval Principality of Moldavia, divided into Bessarabia, Bukovina, and Western Moldavia (after 1859, Romania), made a significant contribution to the formation of the modern Romanian culture. Among these were many Bessarabians, such as Alexandru Donici, Alexandru Hâjdeu, Bogdan Petriceicu Hasdeu, Constantin Stamati, Constantin Stamati-Ciurea, Costache Negruzzi, Alecu Russo, Constantin Stere.

Mihai Eminescu, a late Romantic poet, and Ion Creangă, a writer, are the most influential Romanian language artists, considered national writers both in Romania and Moldova. The country has also important minority ethnic communities. Gagauz, 4.4% of the population, are Christian Turkic people. Greeks, Armenians, Poles, Ukrainians, although not numerous, were present since as early as the 17th century, and had left cultural marks. The 19th century saw the arrival of many more Ukrainians from Podolia and Galicia, as well as new communities, such as Lipovans, Bulgarians, and Germans.

Here you can find the complete Overview of all Theme Weeks.

Read more on Republic of Moldova Tourism, LonelyPlanet.com – Moldova, History of Moldova, Culture of Moldova, Moldavian architectural style, List of World Heritage Sites in Eastern Europe, Moldovan cuisine, Moldovan wine, Politics of Moldova, Moldova–European Union relations, Transnistria, Foreign relations of Moldova, Human rights in Moldova, Tourism in Moldova, Wikitravel Moldova, Wikivoyage Moldova and Wikipedia Moldova. Learn more about the use of photos. To inform you about latest news most of the city, town or tourism websites offer a newsletter service and/or operate Facebook pages/Twitter accounts. In addition more and more destinations, tourist organizations and cultural institutions offer Apps for your Smart Phone or Tablet, to provide you with a mobile tourist guide (Smart Traveler App by U.S. Department of State - Weather report by weather.com). If you have a suggestion, critique, review or comment to this blog entry, we are looking forward to receive your e-mail at comment@wingsch.net. Please name the headline of the blog post to which your e-mail refers to in the subject line.








Recommended posts:

Share this post: (Please note data protection regulations before using buttons)

The Wagner city of Bayreuth

The Wagner city of Bayreuth

[caption id="attachment_160537" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Richard Wagner Festival Hall on the Green Hill © rizi-online.de - Rico Neitzel[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Bayreuth is a sizeable town in northern Bavaria, Germany, on the Red Main river in a valley between the Franconian Jura and the Fichtelgebirge Mountains. The town's roots date back to 1194 and it is nowadays the capital of Upper Franconia with a population of 73,000. It is world-famous for its annual Bayreuth Festival at which performances of operas by the 19th...

[ read more ]

Greater Downtown Miami

Greater Downtown Miami

[caption id="attachment_152067" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Downtown Miami as seen from South Beach © Marc Averette/cc-by-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Downtown Miami is an urban residential neighborhood, which is based around the Central Business District of Miami. Brickell Avenue and Biscayne Boulevard are the main north-south roads, and Flagler Street is the main east-west road. The neighborhood is defined by the Miami Downtown Development Authority (DDA) as the 3.8-square-mile (9.8 km2)-area east of Interstate 95 betwe...

[ read more ]

Theme Week West Jerusalem - The Mamilla Mall

Theme Week West Jerusalem - The Mamilla Mall

[caption id="attachment_192361" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © flickr.com - Ana Paula Hirama/cc-by-sa-2.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Mamilla Mall, also known as Alrov Mamilla Avenue, is an upscale shopping street and the only open-air mall in West Jerusalem. Located northwest of Jaffa Gate, directely at the City Line, the border between East Jerusalem and West Jerusalem, which has survived to this day due to the repeatedly annulled Jerusalem Law by the UN and part of the wider Green Line, the mall consists of a 2,000-foot (6...

[ read more ]

Gleneagles in Scotland

Gleneagles in Scotland

[caption id="attachment_152515" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Gleneagles Hotel and grounds © geograph.org.uk - Simon Ledingham/cc-by-sa-2.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Gleneagles is a glen which connects with Glen Devon to form a pass through the Ochil Hills of Perth and Kinross in Scotland. The name's origin has nothing to do with eagles, and is a corruption of eaglais or ecclesia, meaning church, and refers to the chapel and well of Saint Mungo, which was restored as a memorial to the Haldane family which owns the Gleneagles...

[ read more ]

The Republic of Cyprus

The Republic of Cyprus

[caption id="attachment_152785" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Kykkos Monastery © www.moi.gov.cy[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Cyprus, officially the Republic of Cyprus, is a Eurasian island country in the Eastern Mediterranean, east of Greece, south of Turkey, west of Syria and north of Egypt. It is the third largest island in the Mediterranean Sea and one of its most popular tourist destinations. An advanced, high-income economy with a very high Human Development Index, the Republic of Cyprus was a founding member of the Non-Al...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Balearic Islands

Theme Week Balearic Islands

[caption id="attachment_152413" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Port of Ciudadela - Menorca © J. Braun[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The Balearic Islands are an archipelago in the western Mediterranean Sea, near the eastern coast of the Iberian Peninsula. The four largest islands are: Majorca, Minorca, Ibiza, and Formentera. The archipelago forms an autonomous community and a province of Spain with Palma as the capital city. The co-official languages in the Balearic Islands are Catalan and Spanish. The main islands of the autonomo...

[ read more ]

Diest in Flemish Brabant

Diest in Flemish Brabant

[caption id="attachment_160733" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Market Square © Bescha[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Diest is a city and municipality located in the Belgian province of Flemish Brabant. Situated in the northeast of the Hageland region, Diest neighbours the provinces of Antwerp to its North, and Limburg to the East and is situated around 60km from Brussels. The municipality comprises the city of Diest proper and the towns of Deurne, Kaggevinne, Molenstede, Schaffen and Webbekom. Diest had a total population of 23,15...

[ read more ]

Time for some amusement? Theme parks around the world

Time for some amusement? Theme parks around the world

[caption id="attachment_2271" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Europapark Rust © Jonas Lange"][/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Amusement parks evolved in Europe from fairs and pleasure gardens which were created for people’s recreation. The oldest amusement park in the world (opened 1583) is Bakken, at Klampenborg, north of Copenhagen, Denmark. In the United States, world's fairs and expositions were another influence on development of the amusement park industry. In common language, theme park is often used as a sy...

[ read more ]

The Paradeplatz in Zurich

The Paradeplatz in Zurich

[caption id="attachment_161408" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © SISHION/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The Paradeplatz is a square at the Bahnhofstrasse in downtown Zürich. It is one of the most expensive real estate locations in Switzerland and has become synonymous with wealth and the Swiss banks, being the location of the headquarters of both UBS and Credit Suisse. The site of the square lay without the medieval city walls, and was incorporated into the town with the construction of the new ramparts in 16...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Abu Dhabi - Capital Gate, the Leaning Tower of Abu Dhabi

Theme Week Abu Dhabi - Capital Gate, the Leaning Tower of Abu Dhabi

[caption id="attachment_24848" align="aligncenter" width="393"] Capital Gate, July 2012 © FritzDaCat/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Capital Gate is a skyscraper in Abu Dhabi adjacent to the Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre designed with a striking lean. At 160 m (520 ft) and 35 stories, it is one of the tallest buildings in the city and features an 18° incline to the west. The owner and developer of Capital Gate is Abu Dhabi National Exhibitions Company. The tower (also known as the Leaning Tower of Abu Dhabi) is t...

[ read more ]

Return to Top ▲Return to Top ▲
© JLPizzol/cc-by-sa-4.0
São Marcelo Fort in Salvador da Bahia

São Marcelo Fort (Portuguese: Forte São Marcelo), also known as Forte de Nossa Senhora do Pópulo e São Marcelo or...

Arbroath Harbour © Fraser Muir/cc-by-3.0
Arbroath in Scotland

Arbroath or Aberbrothock is a former royal burgh and the largest town in the council area of Angus in Scotland,...

© Bernt Müller/cc-by-sa-2.0/de
Simon Dach Street in Berlin

Simon-Dach-Straße is a street that was laid out towards the end of the 19th century and is located in Berlin's...

Schließen