Theme Week Tel Aviv

Wednesday, 29 July 2015 - 01:00 pm (CET/MEZ) Berlin | Author/Destination:
Category/Kategorie: General, Bon voyage, Theme Weeks, Union for the Mediterranean
Reading Time:  7 minutes

Tel Aviv from Shalom Meir Tower © Shmuliko/cc-by-sa-3.0

Tel Aviv from Shalom Meir Tower © Shmuliko/cc-by-sa-3.0

Tel Aviv or Tel Aviv-Yafo is the most populous city in Israel and its capital, ahead of West Jerusalem, with a population of 414,600. It is located in central-west Israel, within the Tel Aviv Metropolitan Area, Israel’s largest metropolitan area, containing 42% of Israel’s population. It is also the largest and most populous in Gush Dan, which is collectively home to 3,464,100 residents. Residents of Tel Aviv are referred to as Tel Avivim (singular: Tel Avivi). Tel Aviv is Israel’s de jure capital, de facto it is West Jerusalem, which, however, is only tolerated by the international community, but isn’t recognized as such.

After the Israeli Declaration of Independence by David Ben-Gurion, most countries established their embassies in the Israeli capital Tel Aviv, as the status of Jerusalem in accordance with the United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine was considered unclear. After Israel annexed East Jerusalem in 1980 and had declared in the Jerusalem Law, the “complete and united Jerusalem” as the capital of Israel (which was immediately declared null and void by the UN), the United Nations Security Council Resolution 478 under leadership of the USA called on all states that had their embassies in Jerusalem to close and relocate them. Today, nearly all diplomatic missions are located in and around Tel Aviv.

On May 14, 2018, the Provisional US Embassy was opened in the offices of the US Consulate General in Jerusalem. The building is located in the Arnona neighborhood, centered on the City Line running through Jerusalem as part of the Green Line, and thus partially in the part that was defined as a No man’s land in 1949. Even if it was pure symbolism, especially since the construction of the new embassy building will take years and until then the vast majority of embassy staff will continue to remain in Tel Aviv, while only the ambassador and some personal employees commute. The plain announcement of the embassy move caust massive Palestinian protests, which in turn leads to 58 killed Palestinians (including children) and another 2,500 wounded by the Israelis (New York Times, 14 May 2018: Israelis kill dozens of Palestinians in Gaza protesting U.S. Embassy move to Jerusalem).

Tel Aviv Beach © H20/cc-by-sa-1.0 Tel Aviv Skyline at night © Gilad Avidan/cc-by-sa-3.0 Tel Aviv seen from Jaffa © Wikipeder Tel Aviv from Shalom Meir Tower © Shmuliko/cc-by-sa-3.0 Tel Aviv Beach © EdoM Jaffa © Maksim/cc-by-sa-3.0
<
>
Tel Aviv from Shalom Meir Tower © Shmuliko/cc-by-sa-3.0
Tel Aviv was founded by the Jewish community on the outskirts of the ancient port city of Jaffa in 1909. Immigration by mostly Jewish refugees meant that the growth of Tel Aviv soon outpaced Jaffa’s, which had a majority Arab population at the time. Tel Aviv and Jaffa were merged into a single municipality in 1950, two years after the establishment of the State of Israel. Tel Aviv’s White City, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003, comprises the world’s largest concentration of Bauhaus buildings. Today Tel Aviv is known, sometimes ironically, sometimes seriously, as the “Jewish New York City” (as is the case: not everything that lags is a comparison. On the other hand, e.g. Galway in Ireland calls itself “Barcelona in the rain”. With an average of 220 rainy days a year, at least the last part of the statement is true, just as the last word in New York City is true for Tel Aviv) among Israelis due to the architectural mix, but above all because of the large number of countries of origin of the Jews living there and the resulting diverse cultural influences. After the developments in neighboring Lebanon and the decline of Beirut, the former Paris of the Middle East, Tel Aviv is now the last remaining metropolis with the typical Levante lifestyle. The city is the undisputed economic, social, cultural and technological center of the country and therefore attracting the more liberal and cosmopolitan part of the Israeli population. Anyone interested in the different Jewish lifestyles and influences can explore them in a relatively small space and is in good hands here. Some of the districts to the south of the city should be visited with particular caution.

Tel Aviv is a technological and economic hub, home to the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange, corporate offices and research and development centers. It is the country’s financial capital and a major performing arts and business center. Tel Aviv has been ranked as the twenty-fifth most important financial center in the world. It was built on sand dunes in an area unsuitable for farming. Instead, it developed as a hub of business and scientific research. In 1926, the country’s first shopping arcade, Passage Pensak, was built there. By 1936, as tens of thousands of middle class immigrants arrived from Europe, Tel Aviv was already the largest city in Palestine. A small port was built at the Yarkon estuary, and many cafes, clubs and cinemas opened. Herzl Street became a commercial thoroughfare at this time. The Israeli intelligence service Mossad has its headquarters here. The second official seat of the Prime Minister is located in parts of the former German Colony in Tel Aviv.

Here you can find the complete Overview of all Theme Weeks.

Read more on Tel Aviv, LonelyPlanet.com – Tel Aviv, The German Colony in Palestine, Jerusalem Post, 24 June 2019: Tel Aviv in 2030: City releases master plan for increased tourism, Times of Israel, 23 November 2019: Buses overflow as Tel Aviv launches public transportation on Shabbat, Jerusalem Post, 13 August 2022: What are the origins of Tel Aviv street names? New book explains, Wikitravel Tel Aviv, Wikivoyage tel Aviv and Tel Aviv (Smart Traveler App by U.S. Department of State - Weather report by weather.com - Global Passport Power Rank - Travel Risk Map - Democracy Index - GDP according to IMF, UN, and World Bank - Global Competitiveness Report - Corruption Perceptions Index - Press Freedom Index - World Justice Project - Rule of Law Index - UN Human Development Index - Global Peace Index - Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Index). Photos by Wikimedia Commons. If you have a suggestion, critique, review or comment to this blog entry, we are looking forward to receive your e-mail at comment@wingsch.net. Please name the headline of the blog post to which your e-mail refers to in the subject line.






Recommended posts:

Share this post: (Please note data protection regulations before using buttons)

Molina de Aragón in Spain

Molina de Aragón in Spain

[caption id="attachment_232331" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © flickr.com - Luis Rogelio HM/cc-by-sa-2.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Molina de Aragón is a municipality located in the province of Guadalajara, Castile-La Mancha, Spain. According to the 2009 census (INE), the municipality had a population of 3,671 inhabitants. It holds the record (−28.2°C) for the lowest temperature measured by a meteorological station in Spain. It was the seat of the taifa of Molina, a Moorish independent state, before it was reconq...

[ read more ]

Painted Ladies in San Francisco

Painted Ladies in San Francisco

[caption id="attachment_227779" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © panoramio.com - MARELBU/cc-by-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]In American architecture, painted ladies are Victorian and Edwardian houses and buildings repainted, starting in the 1960s, in three or more colors that embellish or enhance their architectural details. The term was first used for San Francisco Victorian houses by writers Elizabeth Pomada and Michael Larsen in their 1978 book Painted Ladies: San Francisco's Resplendent Victorians. Although polychrome de...

[ read more ]

The Moscow Manege

The Moscow Manege

[caption id="attachment_27626" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © Philipp Hienstorfer/cc-by-2.5[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The Moscow Manege is a large oblong building which gives its name to the vast Manege Square, which was cleared in the 1930s and lies adjacent to the more famous Red Square. A manège is an indoor riding academy. Designed by Spanish engineer Agustín de Betancourt y Molina with a unique roof without internal support for 45 m (the building's width), it was erected from 1817 to 1825 by the Russian archi...

[ read more ]

The Wartburg in Thuringia

The Wartburg in Thuringia

[caption id="attachment_160506" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Wartburg seen from East © Metilsteiner[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The Wartburg is a castle situated on a 1230-foot (410 m) precipice to the southwest of, and overlooking the town of Eisenach, in the state of Thuringia, Germany. In 1999 UNESCO added Wartburg Castle to the World Heritage List as an "Outstanding Monument of the Feudal Period in Central Europe", citing its "Cultural Values of Universal Significance". For centuries, the Wartburg has been a place of pilg...

[ read more ]

Theme Week County Galway - Loughrea

Theme Week County Galway - Loughrea

[caption id="attachment_226508" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © panoramio.com - Ahmet Colakoglu/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Loughrea (Irish: Baile Locha Riach, meaning 'town of the grey/speckled lake') is a town in County Galway, Ireland. The town lies to the north of a range of wooded hills, the Slieve Aughty Mountains, and the lake from which it takes its name. The town's cathedral, St Brendan's, dominates the town's skyline. The town has increased in population in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Althoug...

[ read more ]

Museum of London

Museum of London

[caption id="attachment_223097" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Museum of London building © Ethan Doyle White/cc-by-sa-4.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The Museum of London documents the history of the UK's capital city from prehistoric to modern times and is located in the City of London on the London Wall, close to the Barbican Centre and is part of the Barbican complex of buildings created in the 1960s and 1970s to redevelop a bomb-damaged area of the City. The museum is a few minutes' walk north of St Paul's Cathedral, overlo...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Netherlands - Gouda, historic town in the green heart of the Netherlands

Theme Week Netherlands - Gouda, historic town in the green heart of the Netherlands

[caption id="attachment_160616" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Building at Market Square housing the tourist information © Afhaalchinees[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Gouda (population 71,000) is a city and municipality in the western Netherlands, in the province of South Holland. In the Middle Ages, a settlement was founded at the location of the current city by the Van der Goude family, who built a fortified castle alongside the banks of the Gouwe River, from which the family and the city took its name. The area, originally mar...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Laos - Phongsali

Theme Week Laos - Phongsali

[caption id="attachment_213922" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Phongsali © Stefan Auth[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Phongsali or Phongsaly is the capital of Phongsaly Province. It is the northernmost provincial capital in Laos, opposite Attapeu in the south. The town has about 6,000 inhabitants. It lies at approximately 1,430 meters elevation on the slopes of Mount Phu Fa (1,625 meters). Phongsali has summer temperatures around 25-30 °C, with frequent rain. In winter, from November to March, it is cool and mostly sunny, with da...

[ read more ]

Hôtel Beauharnais in Paris

Hôtel Beauharnais in Paris

[caption id="attachment_237858" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Inauguration of the German embassy residence, 1968© Bundesarchiv - B 145 Bild - F026336-0020/Gathmann, Jens/cc-by-sa-3.0-de[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The Hôtel Beauharnais is a historic hôtel particulier, a type of large French townhouse, in the 7th arrondissement of Paris. It was designed by architect Germain Boffrand. Its construction was completed in 1714. By 1803, the structure was purchased by Eugène de Beauharnais, who had it rebuilt in an Empire style. I...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Monaco - Fontvieille

Theme Week Monaco - Fontvieille

[caption id="attachment_164122" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Port of Fontvieille © Georges Jansoone/cc-by-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Fontvieille is the southernmost ward in the Principality of Monaco. It was developed by an Italian architect, Manfredi Nicoletti, between the 1970s and the 1990s. In contrast to the other city districts Monaco-Ville, Monte Carlo and La Condamine, Fontvieille was constructed, after Italian engineer Gianfranco Gilardini's design, almost entirely on artificially reclaimed land and thus represe...

[ read more ]

Return to TopReturn to Top
© Kora27/cc-by-sa-3.0
Montabaur in Westerwald

Montabaur is a town and the district seat of the Westerwaldkreis in Rhineland-Palatinate. At the same time, it is also...

The Basilica of San Francesco © Berthold Werner
Assisi in Umbria

Assisi is a town and comune of Italy in the province of Perugia in the Umbria region, on the western...

Battle of Sullivan's Island monument © Brian Stansberry/cc-by-3.0
Sullivan’s Island in South Carolina

Sullivan's Island is an American town and island in Charleston County, South Carolina, at the entrance to Charleston Harbor, with...

Close