Tenby in Wales

23 October 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Tenby © geograph.org.uk - Humphrey Bolton/cc-by-sa-2.0

Tenby © geograph.org.uk – Humphrey Bolton/cc-by-sa-2.0

Tenby (Welsh: Dinbych-y-pysgod, meaning little town of the fishes or little fortress of the fish) is a walled seaside town in Pembrokeshire, south Wales, on the western side of Carmarthen Bay. With its strategic position on the far west coast of the British Isles, and a natural sheltered harbour from both the Atlantic Ocean and the Irish Sea, Tenby was a natural settlement point.   read more…

Pembroke in Wales

13 August 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Entrance to Pembroke Castle © geograph.org.uk - Robin Drayton/cc-by-sa-2.0

Entrance to Pembroke Castle © geograph.org.uk – Robin Drayton/cc-by-sa-2.0

Pembroke (Welsh: Penfro) is an historic settlement and former county town of Pembrokeshire in West Wales. The town features a number of historic buildings and complexes and is one of the major population centres in the county. It was the birthplace of Henry Tudor, later Henry VII of England, founder of the Tudor dynasty.   read more…

Llangollen in Wales

16 July 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Plas Newydd © Wolfgang Sauber/cc-by-sa-3.0

Plas Newydd © Wolfgang Sauber/cc-by-sa-3.0

Llangollen is a small town and community in Denbighshire, north-east Wales, situated on the River Dee and on the edge of the Berwyn mountains. Today Llangollen relies heavily on the tourist industry, but still gains substantial income from farming. Most of the farms in the hills around the town were sheep farms, and weaving was an important cottage industry in the area for centuries. Several factories were later built along the banks of the River Dee, where both wool and cotton were processed. The water mill opposite Llangollen railway station is over 600 years old, and was originally used to grind flour for local farmers.   read more…

Theme Week Wales – St Davids

9 July 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

St Davids Cathedral © Chrisrivers/cc-by-sa-3.0

St Davids Cathedral © Chrisrivers/cc-by-sa-3.0

St Davids, is a city and community in Pembrokeshire. Lying on the River Alun on St David’s Peninsula, it is Britain’s smallest city in terms of both size and population, the final resting place of Saint David, the country’s patron saint, and the de facto ecclesiastical capital of Wales. St Davids was given city status in the 16th century due to the presence of St David’s Cathedral but lost this in 1888. City status was restored in 1994 at the request of Queen Elizabeth II.   read more…

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch on the island of Anglesey

7 July 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

St Mary's Church © Necrothesp/cc-by-sa-3.0

St Mary’s Church © Necrothesp/cc-by-sa-3.0

Llanfairpwllgwyngyll is a large village and community on the island of Anglesey in Wales, situated on the Menai Strait next to the Britannia Bridge and across the strait from Bangor. It is alternatively known as Llanfairpwll, Llanfair PG, or Llanfair­pwllgwyngyll­gogery­chwyrn­drobwll­llan­tysilio­gogo­goch. The community has a population of 3,100. The name means:   read more…

Fishguard in Pembrokeshire

2 January 2014 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

High Tide © geograph.org.uk - Pauline Eccles/cc-by-sa-2.0

High Tide © geograph.org.uk – Pauline Eccles/cc-by-sa-2.0

Fishguard (Welsh: Abergwaun, meaning “Mouth of the River Gwaun“) is a coastal town in Pembrokeshire, south-west Wales, with a population of 3,300. The community of Fishguard and Goodwick has a population of 5,000.   read more…

The Wales Coast Path

9 November 2013 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Museums, Exhibitions

Wales Coast Path logo © Hogyn Lleol/cc-by-sa-3.0

Wales Coast Path logo © Hogyn Lleol/cc-by-sa-3.0

The Wales Coast Path (Welsh: Llwybr Arfordir Cymru) is a long-distance footpath which follows the whole of the coastline of Wales. It opened on 5 May 2012, and offers a 870 miles (1,400 km) walking route from Chepstow, in the south, to Queensferry, in the north. Wales is the first country in the world to provide a dedicated footpath along its entire coastline. The Path runs through eleven National Nature Reserves and other nature reserves, including those managed by The Wildlife Trusts or Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB). Lonely Planet rated the coast of Wales first in its Best in Travel: top 10 regions for 2012.   read more…

Aberystwyth in Wales

30 July 2013 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

National Library of Wales © Rhyshuw1/cc-by-sa-3.0

National Library of Wales © Rhyshuw1/cc-by-sa-3.0

Aberystwyth (English: Mouth of the Ystwyth) is a historic market town, administrative centre and holiday resort within Ceredigion, Wales. Often colloquially known as Aber, it is located near the confluence of the rivers Ystwyth and Rheidol. Since the late 19th century, Aberystwyth has also been a major Welsh educational centre, with the establishment of a university college there in 1872. At the 2001 census, the town’s population was 16,000. During nine months of the year, there is an influx of students – to a total number of 10,400 as of September 2012 – but there is no reliable measure of the number of those students whose family residence is outside Aberystwyth.   read more…

The Narrowboats

15 July 2013 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Modern narrowboats on the Kennet and Avon Canal © Per Palmkvist Knudsen/cc-by-sa-2.5

Modern narrowboats on the Kennet and Avon Canal © Per Palmkvist Knudsen/cc-by-sa-2.5

A narrowboat or narrow boat is a boat of a distinctive design, made to fit the narrow canals of Great Britain. In the context of British Inland Waterways, “narrow boat” refers to the original working boats built in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries for carrying goods on the narrow canals (where locks and bridge holes would have a maximum width of at least 7 feet (2.1 m); some locks on the Shropshire Union are even smaller). The term is extended to modern “narrowboats” used for recreation and more and more as homes, whose design is an interpretation of the old boats for modern purposes and modern materials.   read more…

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