Grassmarket in Edinburgh

9 April 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, UNESCO World Heritage

Pubs at Grassmarket © Reinhold Möller/cc-by-sa-4.0

Pubs at Grassmarket © Reinhold Möller/cc-by-sa-4.0

The Grassmarket is a historic market place and an event space in the Old Town (UNESCO World Heritage Site) of Edinburgh, Scotland. In relation to the rest of the city it lies in a hollow, well below surrounding ground levels. The Grassmarket is located directly below Edinburgh Castle and forms part of one of the main east-west vehicle arteries through the city centre. It adjoins the Cowgate and Candlemaker Row at the east end, the West Bow (the lower end of Victoria Street) in the north-east corner, King’s Stables Road to the north west and the West Port to the west. Leading off from the south-west corner is the Vennel, on the east side of which can still be seen some of the best surviving parts of the Flodden and Telfer town walls. The view to the north, dominated by the castle, has long been a favourite subject of painters and photographers, making it one of the iconic views of the city.   read more…

JW3 in London

1 April 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month, London

© jw3.org.uk

© jw3.org.uk

JW3, also known as Jewish Community Centre London, is an arts, culture and entertainment venue, an educational facility and a social and community hub in north London. It is located at 341–351 Finchley Road, London, and opened on 29 September 2013. “Describing itself as a new postcode for Jewish life”, the name “JW3” is a wordplay on its postal address, which is in the NW3 postcode area. Vivien Duffield, whose idea it was, contributed £40m of the project’s £50m cost – over the 10 years it took to bring it to reality – through the Clore Duffield Foundation. It was inspired by her 2003 visit to the Jewish Community Centre in Manhattan, New York City.   read more…

Okehampton in Devon

26 March 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

© Kicior99/cc-by-sa-4.0

© Kicior99/cc-by-sa-4.0

Okehampton is a town and civil parish in West Devon in the English county of Devon. It is situated at the northern edge of Dartmoor, and had a population of 5,922 at the 2011 census. Okehampton is 21 miles (33 km) west of Exeter, 26 miles (42 km) north of Plymouth and 24 miles (38 km) south of Barnstaple.   read more…

Rochdale, birthplace of co-operation

23 March 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Rochdale Town Hall © flickr.com - Tim Green/cc-by-2.0

Rochdale Town Hall © flickr.com – Tim Green/cc-by-2.0

Rochdale is a large town in Greater Manchester, England, at the foothills of the South Pennines in the dale on the River Roch, 5.3 miles (8.5 km) northwest of Oldham and 9.8 miles (15.8 km) northeast of Manchester. It is the administrative centre of the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale, which had a population of 211,699 in 2011. Rochdale Town Hall—a Grade I listed building—dates from 1871 and is one of the United Kingdom’s finest examples of Victorian Gothic revival architecture.   read more…

Borough Market in London

1 March 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London

© flickr.com - Jeremy Keith/cc-by-2.0

© flickr.com – Jeremy Keith/cc-by-2.0

Borough Market is a wholesale and retail market hall in Southwark, London, England. It is one of the largest and oldest food markets in London, with a market on the site dating back to at least the 12th century. The present buildings were built in the 1850s, and today the market mainly sells speciality foods to the general public. Borough Market is located on Southwark Street and Borough High Street just south of Southwark Cathedral on the southern end of London Bridge. The retail market operates Monday to Thursday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fridays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The wholesale market operates on all weekday mornings from 2 a.m. to 8 a.m.   read more…

Hyde Park in London

6 January 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks

© flickr.com - BaldBoris - Chiswick Chap/cc-by-2.0

© flickr.com – BaldBoris – Chiswick Chap/cc-by-2.0

Hyde Park is a Grade I-listed major park in Central London. It is the largest of four Royal Parks that form a chain from the entrance of Kensington Palace through Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park, via Hyde Park Corner and Green Park past the main entrance to Buckingham Palace. The park is divided by the Serpentine and the Long Water lakes.   read more…

Royal Exchange in London

1 January 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month, London

© flickr.com - Rev Stan/cc-by-2.0

© flickr.com – Rev Stan/cc-by-2.0

The Royal Exchange in London was founded in the 16th century by the merchant Sir Thomas Gresham on the suggestion of his factor Richard Clough to act as a centre of commerce for the City of London. The site was provided by the City of London Corporation and the Worshipful Company of Mercers, who still jointly own the freehold. It is trapezoidal in shape and is flanked by Cornhill and Threadneedle Street, which converge at Bank junction in the heart of the City. It lies in the ward of Cornhill.   read more…

University of London

21 September 2020 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London, Universities, Colleges, Academies

Senate House © An Siarach

Senate House © An Siarach

The University of London is a federal research university located in London. As of March 2020<, the university consists of 17 member institutions and three central academic bodies. The university has around 48,000 distance learning external students and 178,735 campus-based internal students, making it the largest university by number of students in the United Kingdom.   read more…

Old Billingsgate Market in London

6 July 2020 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London

Market door detail © MRSC

Market door detail © MRSC

Old Billingsgate Market is the name given to what is now a hospitality and events venue in the City of London, based in the Victorian building that was originally Billingsgate Fish Market, the world’s largest fish market in the 19th century.   read more…

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