Jacksonville in Florida

13 September 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  12 minutes

Riverside and Avondale © Ebyabe/cc-by-sa-3.0

Riverside and Avondale © Ebyabe/cc-by-sa-3.0

Jacksonville is the most populous city in Florida, and is the largest city by area in the contiguous United States as of 2020. It is the seat of Duval County, with which the city government consolidated in 1968. Consolidation gave Jacksonville its great size and placed most of its metropolitan population within the city limits. As of 2020, Jacksonville’s population is 949,611, making it the 12th most populous city in the U.S., the most populous city in the Southeast, and the most populous city in the South outside of the state of Texas. The Jacksonville metropolitan area has a population of 1,523,615 and is the fourth largest metropolitan area in Florida.   read more…

Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles

30 August 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Greater Los Angeles Area Reading Time:  8 minutes

Wilshire Boulevard in Santa Monica © flickr.com - inazakira/cc-by-sa-2.0

Wilshire Boulevard in Santa Monica © flickr.com – inazakira/cc-by-sa-2.0

Wilshire Boulevard is a 15.83 miles (25.48 km) boulevard in the Los Angeles area of Southern California, extending from Ocean Avenue in the city of Santa Monica east to Grand Avenue in the Financial District of downtown Los Angeles. One of the principal east-west arterial roads of Los Angeles, it is also one of the major city streets through the city of Beverly Hills. Wilshire Boulevard runs roughly parallel with Santa Monica Boulevard from Santa Monica to the west boundary of Beverly Hills. From the east boundary it runs a block south of Sixth Street to its terminus. The boulevard was named after Henry Gaylord Wilshire (1861-1927), a landowner, publisher and socialist (only in America: A boulevard that stands for income inequality between the poor (homeless camps) and the super rich like no other in the world is named after a socialist. You can’t help but grin).   read more…

Rutgers University

28 August 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Universities, Colleges, Academies Reading Time:  6 minutes

Old Queens, the oldest building at Rutgers University in New Brunswick © Zeete/cc-by-sa-4.0

Old Queens, the oldest building at Rutgers University in New Brunswick © Zeete/cc-by-sa-4.0

Rutgers University (RU), formally known as Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a public land-grant research university based in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Chartered in 1766, Rutgers was originally called Queen’s College. It is the eighth-oldest college in the United States, the second-oldest in New Jersey (after Princeton University), and one of the nine U.S. colonial colleges that were chartered before the American Revolution. In 1825, Queen’s College was renamed Rutgers College in honor of Colonel Henry Rutgers, whose substantial gift to the school had stabilized its finances during a period of uncertainty. For most of its existence, Rutgers was a private liberal arts college but it has evolved into a coeducational public research university after being designated The State University of New Jersey by the New Jersey Legislature via laws enacted in 1945 and 1956.   read more…

Beaver Building in New York City

16 August 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, New York City Reading Time:  5 minutes

© flickr.com - Tony Hisgett/cc-by-2.0

© flickr.com – Tony Hisgett/cc-by-2.0

1 Wall Street Court (also known as the Beaver Building and the Cocoa Exchange) is a residential building in the Financial District of Manhattan in New York City. The 15-story building, designed by Clinton and Russell in the Renaissance Revival style, was completed in 1904 at the intersection of Wall, Pearl, and Beaver Streets.   read more…

University of Notre Dame

9 August 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, General, Universities, Colleges, Academies Reading Time:  7 minutes

Main Building © Matthew Rice/cc-by-sa-4.0

Main Building © Matthew Rice/cc-by-sa-4.0

The University of Notre Dame du Lac, known simply as Notre Dame or ND, is a private Catholic research university in Notre Dame, Indiana, outside the city of South Bend. It was founded in 1842 by Edward Sorin. The main campus covers 1,261 acres (510 ha) in a suburban setting; it contains a number of recognizable landmarks, such as the Golden Dome, the Word of Life mural (commonly known as Touchdown Jesus), Notre Dame Stadium, and the Basilica.   read more…

Hyde Park, the Heart of the Hudson Valley in the State of New York

30 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  10 minutes

Culinary Institute of America - Roth Hall and Colavita Center for Italian Food and Wine © Pascal Auricht

Culinary Institute of America – Roth Hall and Colavita Center for Italian Food and Wine © Pascal Auricht

Hyde Park is a town in Dutchess County, New York, bordering the Hudson River north of Poughkeepsie. Within the town are the hamlets of Hyde Park, East Park, Staatsburg, and Haviland. The Hudson River defines the west town line, which is the border with Ulster County. Hyde Park is bordered by the town of Poughkeepsie to the south, Rhinebeck to the north, and Clinton and Pleasant Valley to the east. Gilded Age properties can be found throughout the central Hudson Valley (Mid-Hudson). Here some of the rich and super-rich from the economic heyday of the USA have (summer) residences built to bring sufficient distance between themselves and the mob from New York City. In parts, it still works today. Hyde Park is known as the hometown of Franklin D. Roosevelt, the 32nd president of the United States. His house there, now the Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site, is listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places, as are the homes of Eleanor Roosevelt, Isaac Roosevelt, and Frederick William Vanderbilt, along with Haviland Middle School (formerly Franklin D. Roosevelt High School). Hyde Park is home to the main campus of the Culinary Institute of America, a four-year college for culinary and baking and pastry arts, and the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum, the first presidential library in the United States.   read more…

Brown University in Providence

29 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Universities, Colleges, Academies Reading Time:  6 minutes

Sayles Hall © Filetime

Sayles Hall © Filetime

Brown University is a private Ivy League research university in Providence, Rhode Island. Founded in 1764 as the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Brown is the seventh-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution. Admission is among the most selective in the United States; in 2021, the university reported an acceptance rate of 5.4%.   read more…

The Millennium Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles

19 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Greater Los Angeles Area, Hotels Reading Time:  8 minutes

© flickr.com - Chris Eason/cc-by-2-0

© flickr.com – Chris Eason/cc-by-2-0

The Millennium Biltmore Hotel, originally the Los Angeles Biltmore of the Bowman-Biltmore Hotels group, is a luxury hotel located opposite Pershing Square in Downtown Los Angeles, California. Upon its grand opening in 1923, the Los Angeles Biltmore was the largest hotel west of Chicago in the United States. In 1969 the Biltmore Hotel was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles. In 1951, the Los Angeles Biltmore Hotel Company sold to Corrigan Properties for more than $12 million. Regal Hotels purchased the Biltmore in 1996, and then sold it in 1999 to Millennium & Copthorne Hotels. As of 2009, the Los Angeles Biltmore is operated as part of the Millennium & Copthorne Hotels chain as the Millennium Biltmore Hotel. The hotel has 70,000 square feet (6,500 m²) of meeting and banquet space. From its original 1500 guestrooms it now has 683, due to room reorganization. Since 2015, four restaurants and bars serve the hotel, including Smeraldi’s Restaurant (American continental cuisine), newly relaunched Bugis Street Brasserie, the Rendezvous Court, and the Gallery Bar.   read more…

Rapid City in South Dakota

12 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  8 minutes

Firehouse Brewing Company © flickr.com - Nick Amoscato/cc-by-2.0

Firehouse Brewing Company © flickr.com – Nick Amoscato/cc-by-2.0

Rapid City (Lakota: “Swift Water City”) is the second most populous city in South Dakota and the county seat of Pennington County. Named after Rapid Creek, where the settlement developed, it is in western South Dakota, on the Black Hills‘ eastern slope. As of 2019, the population was estimated at 77,500.   read more…

Return to TopReturn to Top