The Navigator of the Seas

1 May 2017 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Cruise Ships, Yacht of the Month

© Leinad/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Leinad/cc-by-sa-3.0

MS Navigator of the Seas is the fourth Voyager-class cruise ship operated by Royal Caribbean International, and the first second-generation Voyager-class ship. She was once the largest ship in the fleet and still ranks among the largest passenger ships in the world. Her sister ships are Voyager of the Seas, Explorer of the Seas, Adventure of the Seas und Mariner of the Seas. Constructed at Kværner Masa-Yards Turku New Shipyard, Finland, the ship originally measured 138,279 GT and carried 3,807 passengers plus additional crew. A refurbishment in 2014 added 81 additional staterooms, increasing the ship’s gross tonnage to 139,570 GT. Her length is 1,020 feet with a beam of 157.5 feet. The ship contains US $ 8.5 Million dollars in art, displayed in stairwells and public areas. Navigator of the Seas’ main Atrium sculpture spans over seven decks and is based on the bubbles a scuba diver makes when swimming under water. Her promenade also features lighting that changes color based on the time of day and with events occurring on the ship.   read more…

The Freedom of the Seas

1 May 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Cruise Ships, Yacht of the Month

Freedom of the Seas on the maiden voyage © Andres Manuel Rodriguez

Freedom of the Seas on the maiden voyage © Andres Manuel Rodriguez

MS Freedom of the Seas is a cruise ship operated by Royal Caribbean International. It is the namesake of Royal Caribbean’s Freedom class, and can accommodate 3,634 passengers and 1,300 crew on fifteen passenger decks. Freedom of the Seas was the largest passenger ship ever built from 2006 until construction of the Royal Caribbean International’s Oasis-class ships in late 2009. The Freedom of the Seas was built at the Aker Yards Turku Shipyard, Finland, which built the ships of the Voyager class as well as the other ships of the Freedom class. Upon its completion, it became the largest passenger ship ever built, taking that honor from Cunard‘s Queen Mary 2. Freedom of the Seas arrived in New York Harbor for its official naming ceremony on 12 May 2006 which was broadcast live on NBC’s The Today Show from Cape Liberty Cruise Port in Bayonne, New Jersey (the ship’s official New York berth), and thereafter traveled to Boston for the weekend of May 19–22. It began operations out of Miami with its first cruise and maiden voyage on June 4, sailing to western Caribbean locations in Mexico, the Cayman Islands and Jamaica as well as Labadee, in Haiti, one of Royal Caribbean’s private resorts. Although the ship is registered in Nassau, The Bahamas, it is home ported in Port Canaveral, Florida, after moving from the Port of Miami.   read more…

Europe’s Capital of Culture 2011: Tallinn (Estonia) and Turku (Finland)

3 January 2011 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, European Union, General, European Capital of Culture, UNESCO World Heritage

© Tallinn 2011

© Tallinn 2011

Tallinn
Tallinn was appointed in November 2007 together with the Finnish City of Turku to one of the European Capital’s of Culture 2011. With the motto “Tales from the sea” numerous cultural events and festivals will be held in 2011, including the “Tallinn Maritime Days”, which will bring the city closer to the sea again. About a dozen architectural installations will be built in the city. Since independence, improving air and sea transport links with Western Europe and Estonia’s accession to the European Union have made Tallinn easily accessible to tourists. Estonia has made rapid economic progress since independence and this is reflected in local prices. Although not extortionate, neither are prices as cheap as in other former Eastern Bloc countries. The main attractions are in the two old towns (Lower Town and Toompea – UNESCO World Cultural Heritage sites since 1997) which are both easily explored on foot. Eastern districts around Pirita and Kadriorg are also worth visiting and the Estonian Open Air Museum (Eesti Vabaõhumuuseum) in Rocca al Mare, west of the city, preserves aspects of Estonian rural culture and architecture.   read more…

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