Annaberg-Buchholz in Saxony

29 March 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, UNESCO World Heritage

© Devilsanddust/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Devilsanddust/cc-by-sa-3.0

Annaberg-Buchholz is a town in the Free State of Saxony, Germany. Lying in the Ore Mountains, it is the capital of the district of Erzgebirgskreis. The previously heavily forested upper Ore Mountains were settled in the 12th and 13th centuries by Franconian farmers. Frohnau, Geyersdorf, and Kleinrückerswalde—all now part of present-day town—are all attested from 1397. The most well-known personalities associated with Annaberg-Buchholz include Adam Riese, the “father of modern arithmetic”.   read more…

Königstein Fortress in Saxony

1 May 2017 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks

Königstein Fortress © Fritz-Gerald Schröder

Königstein Fortress © Fritz-Gerald Schröder

Königstein Fortress, the “Saxon Bastille“, is a hilltop fortress near Dresden, in Saxon Switzerland, above the town of Königstein on the left bank of the River Elbe. It is one of the largest hilltop fortifications in Europe and sits atop the table hill of the same name. The 9.5 hectare rock plateau rises 240 metres above the Elbe and has over 50 buildings, some over 400 years old, that bear witness to the military and civilian life in the fortress. The rampart run of the fortress is 1,800 metres long with walls up to 42 metres high and steep sandstone faces. In the centre of the site is a 152.5 metre deep well, which is the deepest in Saxony and second deepest well in Europe. The fortress, which for centuries was used as a state prison, is still intact and is now one of Saxony‘s foremost tourist attractions, with 700,000 visitors per year.   read more…

Silicon Saxony in Dresden

3 August 2016 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Universities, Colleges, Academies

© silicon-saxony.de

© silicon-saxony.de

Silicon Saxony is a registered industry association of nearly 300 companies in the microelectronics and related sectors in Saxony, Germany, with around 40,000 employees. Many, but not all, of those firms are situated in the north of Dresden. With a name chosen referring to Silicon Valley, the area and the union — in many aspects — represent the only meaningful European center of microelectronics. Many of those firms have very research and capital intensive business models competing with subsidized global players, mainly from Asia.   read more…

Freital in Saxony

14 July 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

© Kolossos/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Kolossos/cc-by-sa-3.0

Freital is a town in the district of Sächsische Schweiz-Osterzgebirge in Saxony, Germany. The town is situated on a small river, the Weißeritz, and is 8 kilometres southwest of Dresden. Freital is located southwest of Dresden in the Döhlen Basin, through which the Weißeritz flows from south-west to north-east. The Windberg hill, is the town’s local mountain and well-known landmark, rising about 100 metres above the valley floor. The lowest part of the town is the point where the Weißeritz enters the territory of the city of Dresden.   read more…

Theme Week Dresden – New Synagogue

17 June 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

New Synagogue © Maros M r a z/cc-by-sa-3.0

New Synagogue © Maros M r a z/cc-by-sa-3.0

The New Synagogue is a synagogue in Dresden. The edifice was completed in 2001 and designed by architects Rena Wandel-Hoefer and Wolfgang Lorch. The building was shortlisted by the jury for the European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture in 2003. It was built on the same location as the Semper Synagogue (1839–1840) designed by Gottfried Semper, which was destroyed in 1938, during the Kristallnacht.   read more…

Theme Week Dresden – The Frauenkirche

11 April 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Museums, Exhibitions

© flickr.com - Christian Prade/cc-by-2.0

© flickr.com – Christian Prade/cc-by-2.0

The Dresden Frauenkirche is a Lutheran church in Dresden, the capital of the German state of Saxony. Although the original church was Roman Catholic until it became Protestant during the Reformation, the current Baroque building was purposely built Protestant. It is considered an outstanding example of Protestant sacred architecture, featuring one of the largest domes in Europe. Built in the 18th century, the church was destroyed in the bombing of Dresden during World War II. The remaining ruins were left as a war memorial, following decisions of local East German leaders. The church was rebuilt after the reunification of Germany. The reconstruction of its exterior was completed in 2004 and its interior in 2005. The church was reconsecrated on 30 October 2005 with festive services lasting through the Protestant observance of Reformation Day on 31 October. It now also serves as symbol of reconciliation between former warring enemies. The surrounding Neumarkt square with its many valuable baroque buildings is also reconstructed since 2004. The Frauenkirche is often called a cathedral, however it is not the seat of a bishop. The bishop’s church is the Church of the Cross. Once a month, an Anglican Evensong is held in English, by clergy from the St. George’s Anglican Chaplaincy. The original Baroque church was built between 1726 and 1743, and was designed by Dresden’s city architect, George Bähr, who did not live to see the completion of his greatest work. Bähr’s distinctive design for the church captured the new spirit of the Protestant liturgy by placing the altar, pulpit, and baptismal font directly centred in view of the entire congregation. In 1736, famed organ maker Gottfried Silbermann built a three-manual, 43-stop instrument for the church. The organ was dedicated on 25 November and Johann Sebastian Bach gave a recital on the instrument on 1 December. The church’s most distinctive feature was its unconventional 96 m-high dome, called die Steinerne Glocke or “Stone Bell”.   read more…

Theme Week Dresden – State Art Collections

13 December 2014 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Museums, Exhibitions

© Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

© Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden (English: Dresden State Art Collections) is a cultural institution in Dresden, owned by the State of Saxony. It is one of the most renowned and oldest museum institutions in the world, originating from the collections of the Saxon electors in the 16th century. The Staatliche Kunstsammlungen has been a state-owned enterprise since January 1, 2009. The association includes twelve museums which operate independently within the context of their own collection, but all share various institutions and facilities as well as a central administration. In 2012 2.5 million visitors visited the museums.   read more…

The Lusatian Lake District

28 October 2014 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks

Lusatian Lake District map © Maximilian Dörrbecker/cc-by-sa-2.0

Lusatian Lake District map © Maximilian Dörrbecker/cc-by-sa-2.0

The Lusatian Lake Distric is a chain of artificial lakes in Germany, situated across the north-eastern part of Saxony and the southern part of Brandenburg. Through flooding as a part of an extensive regeneration programme, several decommissioned lignite opencast mines are in process to be transformed to Europe’s largest artificial lake district by 2018.   read more…

Theme Week Dresden – The Semperoper

16 July 2014 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Opera Houses, Theaters, Libraries

© Sebastian Terfloth/cc-by-3.0

© Sebastian Terfloth/cc-by-3.0

The Semperoper is the opera house of the Sächsische Staatsoper Dresden (Saxon State Opera) and the concert hall of the Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden (Saxon State Orchestra). It is also home to the Semperoper ballet. The building is located on the Theatre Square in central Dresden on the bank of the Elbe River in the historic centre of Dresden. The opera house was originally built by the architect Gottfried Semper in 1841. After a devastating fire in 1869, the opera house was rebuilt, partly again by Semper, and completed in 1878. The opera house has a long history of premieres, including major works by Richard Wagner and Richard Strauss.   read more…

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