Trinity Buoy Wharf in London

26 April 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London

Bow Creek Lighthouse © Grim23/cc-by-sa-3.0

Bow Creek Lighthouse © Grim23/cc-by-sa-3.0

Trinity Buoy Wharf is the site of a lighthouse, by the confluence of the River Thames and Bow Creek on the Leamouth Peninsula, Poplar. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. The lighthouse no longer functions, but is the home of various art projects such as Longplayer. It is sometimes known as Bow Creek Lighthouse.   read more…

Eel Pie Island in London

13 December 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London

The Eel Pie Island Museum in Twickenham © flickr.com - Jim Linwood/cc-by-2.0

The Eel Pie Island Museum in Twickenham © flickr.com – Jim Linwood/cc-by-2.0

Eel Pie Island is a 8.935-acre (3.6 ha) island in the River Thames at Twickenham in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. It is on the maintained minimum head of water above the only lock on the Tideway and is accessible by boat or from the left (generally north) bank by footbridge. The island had a club that was a major venue for jazz and blues in the 1960s.   read more…

Tower of London

1 March 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month, London, Museums, Exhibitions, UNESCO World Heritage

© Bob Collowân/cc-by-sa-4.0

© Bob Collowân/cc-by-sa-4.0

The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, separated from the eastern edge of the square mile of the City of London by the open space known as Tower Hill. It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078 and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite. The castle was used as a prison from 1100 (Ranulf Flambard) until 1952 (Kray twins), although that was not its primary purpose. A grand palace early in its history, it served as a royal residence. As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion, mainly under Kings Richard I, Henry III, and Edward I in the 12th and 13th centuries. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains despite later activity on the site.   read more…

Holiday on the Thames

25 September 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

River Thames with Hampton Church Shakespeare's Temple and Garrick's Villa © Motmit

River Thames with Hampton Church Shakespeare’s Temple and Garrick’s Villa © Motmit

The River Thames is a major river flowing through southern England. While it is best known because its lower reaches flow through central London, the river flows alongside several other towns and cities, including Oxford, Reading, Henley-on-Thames, Windsor, Kingston upon Thames and Richmond.   read more…

Wallingford in Oxfordshire

9 December 2014 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

The Coach & Horses pub © geograph.org.uk - Bill Nicholls/cc-by-sa-2.0

The Coach & Horses pub © geograph.org.uk – Bill Nicholls/cc-by-sa-2.0

Wallingford is a market town and civil parish in the upper Thames Valley in England. Until 1974 it was in Berkshire, but was transferred to Oxfordshire in that year. The town’s royal but mostly ruined Wallingford Castle held high status in the early medieval period as a regular royal residence until the Black Death hit the town badly in 1349. Empress Matilda retreated here for the final time from Oxford Castle in 1141. The castle declined subsequently, much stone being removed to renovate Windsor Castle instead. Nonetheless the town’s Priory produced two of the greatest minds of the age, the mathematician Richard of Wallingford and the chronicler John of Wallingford.   read more…

The Battersea Power Station in London

1 August 2014 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month, London

© Tosh Marshall/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Tosh Marshall/cc-by-sa-3.0

Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames, in Battersea, an inner-city district of South West London. It comprises two individual power stations, built in two stages in the form of a single building. Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to its east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the well known four-chimney layout. The proposal sparked protests from those who felt that the building would be too large and would be an eyesore, as well as worries about the pollution damaging local buildings, parks and even paintings in the nearby Tate Gallery. The company addressed the former concern by hiring Sir Giles Gilbert Scott to design the building’s exterior. He was a noted architect and industrial designer, famous for his design of the red telephone box, and of Liverpool Anglican Cathedral. He would go on to design another London power station, Bankside, which now houses Tate Modern art gallery. The pollution issue was resolved by granting permission for the station on the condition that its emissions were to be treated, to ensure they were cleaner and contained less smoke. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II* listed. The station’s celebrity owes much to numerous cultural appearances.   read more…

Eton and Eton College

29 October 2011 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Universities, Colleges, Academies

Eton College © Herry Lawford

Eton College © Herry Lawford

Eton is a town and civil parish in Berkshire, England, lying on the opposite bank of the River Thames to Windsor and connected to it by Windsor Bridge. It has a population of 5,000. Eton was transferred from Buckinghamshire to Berkshire in 1974. Since 1998 it has been part of the unitary authority of Windsor and Maidenhead.   read more…

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