Stamford Hill in London

10 May 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London

© flickr.com - Alisdare Hickson/cc-by-sa-2.0

© flickr.com – Alisdare Hickson/cc-by-sa-2.0 (That there are very different views within the Jewish communities is not new, but the fundamental opposition to Zionism and Israel is remarkable every time. This was first noticed by a broader public at the regular demonstrations in front of the main entrance of the UN headquarters in New Yok City, but it apparently goes well beyond that.)

Stamford Hill is an area in Inner London, England, located about 5.5 miles north-east of Charing Cross. The neighbourhood is a sub-district of Hackney, the major component of the London Borough of Hackney, and is known for its Hasidic community, the largest concentration of Hasidic Jews in Europe. The district takes its name from the eponymous hill, which reaches a height of 33m AOD, and the originally Roman A10 also takes the name “Stamford Hill”, as it makes its way through the area.   read more…

Vienna City Prayer House

14 April 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

© Bic/cc-by-sa-4.0

© Bic/cc-by-sa-4.0

The Stadttempel (English: City Prayer House), also called the Seitenstettengasse Temple, is the main synagogue of Vienna, Austria. It is located in the Innere Stadt 1st district, at Seitenstettengasse 4. The synagogue was constructed from 1824 to 1826. The luxurious Stadttempel was fitted into a block of houses and hidden from plain view of the street, because of an edict issued by Emperor Joseph II that only Roman Catholic places of worship were allowed to be built with facades fronting directly on to public streets. This edict saved the synagogue from total destruction during the Kristallnacht in November 1938, since the synagogue could not be destroyed without setting on fire the buildings to which it was attached. The Stadttempel was the only synagogue in the city to survive World War II, as German paramilitary troops with the help of local authorities destroyed all of the other 93 synagogues and Jewish prayer-houses in Vienna. The Jewish community in Vienna today has about 7,000 members and thus represents the largest part of the Jews living in Austria. The Jewish Museum Vienna offers guided tours of the city temple.   read more…

JW3 in London

1 April 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month, London

© jw3.org.uk

© jw3.org.uk

JW3, also known as Jewish Community Centre London, is an arts, culture and entertainment venue, an educational facility and a social and community hub in north London. It is located at 341–351 Finchley Road, London, and opened on 29 September 2013. “Describing itself as a new postcode for Jewish life”, the name “JW3” is a wordplay on its postal address, which is in the NW3 postcode area. Vivien Duffield, whose idea it was, contributed £40m of the project’s £50m cost – over the 10 years it took to bring it to reality – through the Clore Duffield Foundation. It was inspired by her 2003 visit to the Jewish Community Centre in Manhattan, New York City.   read more…

Synagogue of Halle (Saale)

27 January 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Halle Synagogue © Allexkoch/cc-by-sa-4.0

Halle Synagogue © Allexkoch/cc-by-sa-4.0

The synagogue of Halle (Saale) is the house of worship of the Jewish community in Halle (Saale), which had 555 members in 2018. The building was originally built in 1894 as the Tahara House of the Jewish cemetery, laid out in 1864 northeast of downtown Halle, from white and yellow bricks according to plans by the architects Gustav Wolff and Theodor Lehmann. The conversion to a synagogue took place from 1948 after some renovations (consecrated in 1953) as a replacement for the old synagogue in the city center, which was destroyed during the November pogroms in 1938.   read more…

Mea Shearim in West Jerusalem

11 January 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Union for the Mediterranean

Shabbat Square © Djampa/cc-by-sa-4.0

Shabbat Square © Djampa/cc-by-sa-4.0

Mea Shearim (“hundred gates”; contextually, “a hundred fold”) is one of the oldest Jewish neighborhoods in Jerusalem. It is populated by Haredi Jews, and was built by members of the Old Yishuv. The oldest Sephardic Haredi dynasty, Levi Kahana of Spain, has a religious cultural center in the neighborhood. The name Mea Shearim is derived from a verse from Genesis, which happened to be part of the weekly Torah portion that was read the week the settlement was founded: “Isaac sowed in that land, and in that year, he reaped a hundredfold; God had blessed him” (Genesis 26:12). According to a tradition, the community originally had 100 gates, another meaning of Mea Shearim.   read more…

Konstanz New Synagogue

9 November 2020 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

New Synagogue © Waithamai/cc-by-sa-4.0

New Synagogue © Waithamai/cc-by-sa-4.0

The synagogue in Konstanz, the district town of the district of Konstanz in Baden-Württemberg, was built in 1882/1883 and destroyed during the November pogroms in 1938. This first synagogue was on Sigismundstrasse. A new building was inaugurated in 2019. The Jewish community of Konstanz tried to build a synagogue from 1872. The property at Sigismundstrasse 19 was purchased from the Konstanz Hospital Foundation and, thanks to numerous donations and a loan, the financing was secured. The synagogue was built according to the plans of the architect and city builder Holzmann from Constance. The inauguration, attended by numerous representatives of the state and municipal authorities and the Christian churches, took place on September 28, 1883.   read more…

Theme Week Moldova – Bender City

31 October 2020 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Freedom Square © Maturion/cc-by-sa-4.0

Freedom Square © Maturion/cc-by-sa-4.0

Bender or Tighina (Romanian) is a city within the internationally recognized borders of Moldova under control of the unrecognized Transnistria since 1992. It is located on the western bank of the river Dniester in the Romanian historical region of Bessarabia. Together with its suburb Proteagailovca, the city forms a municipality, which is separate from Transnistria (as an administrative unit of Moldova) according to Moldovan law. Bender is located in the buffer zone established at the end of the 1992 War of Transnistria. While the Joint Control Commission has overriding powers in the city, Transnistria has administrative control. The fortress of Tighina was one of the important historic fortresses of the Principality of Moldova.   read more…

19th arrondissement of Paris

19 October 2020 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Paris / Île-de-France

Bassin de la Villette © Myrabella/cc-by-sa-3.0

Bassin de la Villette © Myrabella/cc-by-sa-3.0

The 19th arrondissement of Paris (XIXe arrondissement) is one of the 20 arrondissements of the capital city of France. In spoken French, this arrondissement is referred to as dix-neuvième. La petite Jérusalem (Little Jerusalem) is located in the Quartier de la Mouzaïa/Quartier d’Amérique.   read more…

Portuguese Synagogue in Amsterdam

14 October 2020 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

© A.A.W.J. Rietman/cc-by-sa-4.0

© A.A.W.J. Rietman/cc-by-sa-4.0

The Portuguese Synagogue<, also known as the Esnoga, or Snoge, is a late 17th-century Sephardic synagogue in Amsterdam, completed in 1675. Esnoga is the word for synagogue in Ladino, the traditional Judaeo-Spanish language of Sephardic Jews. The Amsterdam Sephardic community (History of the Jews in Spain, History of the Jews in Portugal, Alhambra Decree) was one of the largest and richest Jewish communities in Europe during the Dutch Golden Age, and their very large synagogue reflected this. The synagogue remains an active place of worship and is also a popular tourist attraction.   read more…

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