Berlin-Dahlem

26 November 2022 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Berlin Reading Time:  17 minutes

Free University of Berlin - Rost- und Silberlaube complex © Unify~commonswiki/cc-by-sa-3.0

Free University of Berlin – Rost- und Silberlaube complex © Unify~commonswiki/cc-by-sa-3.0

Dahlem is a locality of the Steglitz-Zehlendorf borough in southwestern Berlin. Until Berlin’s 2001 administrative reform it was a part of the former borough of Zehlendorf. It is located between the mansion settlements of Grunewald and Lichterfelde West. Dahlem is one of the most affluent parts of the city and a center for academic research. It is home to the Freie Universität Berlin, with its architecturally significant Philological Library (“The Brain”). Several other research institutions and museums, as well as parts of the Grunewald forest with its renaissance hunting lodge, are located in Dahlem. The U3 line of the Berlin U-Bahn system connects Dahlem to central Berlin.   read more…

Bergen auf Rügen

24 November 2022 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  9 minutes

© THFR/cc-by-sa-3.0

© THFR/cc-by-sa-3.0

Bergen auf Rügen is the capital of the former district of Rügen in the middle of the island of Rügen in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. Since 1 January 2005, Bergen has moreover been the administrative seat of the Amt of Bergen auf Rügen, which with a population of over 23,000 is Mecklenburg-Vorpommern’s most populous Amt.   read more…

Reconstruction of the Bornplatz synagogue in Hamburg

9 November 2022 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Hamburg Reading Time:  15 minutes

Bornplatz synagogue in 1906, right after the opening © Knackstedt & Näther - Stiftung Historische Museen

Bornplatz synagogue in 1906, right after the opening © Knackstedt & Näther – Stiftung Historische Museen

The synagogue on Bornplatz in Hamburg‘s Grindelviertel was inaugurated in 1906 and was one of the largest synagogues in Germany. It served as the main synagogue for the German-Israelite Community (DIG). In the immediate vicinity, the building of the Talmud Torah School was erected in 1911. The synagogue was devastated during the Kristallnacht pogrom on 9 November 1938, set on fire shortly afterwards and the ruins were demolished in 1939 by the local Nazi regime at the expense of the Jewish community. Fifty years after the destruction, the former location was redesigned, and since then a floor mosaic has indicated the location of the synagogue. Since 2019, the Jewish community, the Central Council of Jews in Germany and several organizations have been working to rebuild the synagogue. In February 2020, an application for a feasibility study was unanimously accepted by the Hamburg Parliament. In November 2020, the budget committee of the Bundestag released 65 million euros for the restoration of the synagogue.   read more…

Inner new town of Dresden

30 October 2022 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  9 minutes

Hauptstraße © VSchagow/cc-by-sa-4.0

Hauptstraße © VSchagow/cc-by-sa-4.0

The Innere Neustadt (Inner New City) is a neighborhood in Dresden within the administrative district of Neustadt. The name is derived from “Neue Königliche Stadt” (New Royal City), the name given to the former district of Altendresden when it was rebuilt after a fire before 1732. In contrast to the Äußere Neustadt (Outer New City), the Innere Neustadt was within the city fortifications and, for that reason, is also known as the historic Neustadt. Its population is 7,761 (2020). The Innere Neustadt is located in the administrative district of Neustadt, on the right bank across the Elbe and to the north of the Innere Altstadt (Inner Old City). The River Elbe forms an enclosing arc around the Innere Neustadt. Four bridges cross the Elbe, connecting the district with the southern bank of the Elbe. Of these, only Augustusbrucke is historic. The streets leading to these bridges cross the Innere Neustadt and join at Albertplatz (Albert Place), at the northern end of the district (originally called Bautzner Platz).   read more…

Inner old town of Dresden

30 October 2022 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  7 minutes

Inner old town © Zinneke/cc-by-sa-3.0

Inner old town © Zinneke/cc-by-sa-3.0

The inner old town is a neighbourhood in the district of Altstadt and the historic city center of the Saxon state capital Dresden. It is part of the Altstadt I district. Many of Dresden’s best-known buildings are located in the inner old town. In addition to the Frauenkirche, these are the Zwinger, the Semperoper, the Residenzschloss, the Katholische Hofkirche, the Kreuzkirche and numerous other buildings. Important squares are the Altmarkt, the Neumarkt, the Theaterplatz and the Schloßplatz. There are also parks in the small district, such as the Brühlsche Garten at the eastern end of the Brühlsche Terrasse and the pond at the Zwinger.   read more…

Sellin Pier

15 October 2022 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  5 minutes

© Haloorange

© Haloorange

Sellin Pier (German: Seebrücke Sellin) is a pier in the Baltic seaside resort of Sellin on the German island of Rügen. The pier has a restaurant near the beach over the water and has a diving gondola (Tauchgondel).   read more…

Bautzen in Saxony

3 October 2022 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  13 minutes

© Stephan M. Höhne/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Stephan M. Höhne/cc-by-sa-3.0

Bautzen is a hill-top town in eastern Saxony, Germany, and the administrative centre of the district of Bautzen. It is located on the Spree river. In 2018 the town’s population was 39,087. Until 1868, its German name was Budissin. Bautzen is often regarded as the unofficial, but historical capital of Upper Lusatia. The town is also the most important cultural centre of the Sorbian minority, which constitutes about 10 percent of Bautzen’s population. Asteroid 11580 Bautzen is named in honour of the city. The town is situated about 50 km (31 mi) east of Dresden between the Lusatian highland and the lowlands in the north, amidst the region of Upper Lusatia. To the north stretches the Bautzen Reservoir, which was flooded in 1974. This is the former location of the villages of Malsissy (Małšecy) and Nimschütz (Hněwsecy).   read more…

Kranhäuser in Cologne

19 September 2022 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  5 minutes

Kranhäuser and Cologne Cathedral © Martin Falbisoner/cc-by-sa-4.0

Kranhäuser and Cologne Cathedral © Martin Falbisoner/cc-by-sa-4.0

Kranhaus (“crane house”, plural Kranhäuser) refers to each one of the three 17-story buildings in the Rheinauhafen of Cologne, Germany. Their shape, an upside-down “L”, is reminiscent of the harbor cranes that were used to load cargo from and onto ships, two of which were left standing as monuments when the harbor was redesigned as a residential and commercial quarter in the early 2000s. Each building is about 62 m (203 ft) high, 70.2 m (230 ft) long, and 33.75 m (110.7 ft) wide.   read more…

70 years Luxembourg Agreement

10 September 2022 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  16 minutes

Luxembourg City Hall © Cayambe/cc-by-sa-3.0

Luxembourg City Hall © Cayambe/cc-by-sa-3.0

The Reparations Agreement between Israel and the Federal Republic of Germany (“Luxembourg Agreement”, “Wiedergutmachungsabkommen” or “Reparations Agreement”) was signed on September 10, 1952, and entered in force on March 27, 1953. According to the Agreement, West Germany was to pay Israel for the costs of “resettling so great a number of uprooted and destitute Jewish refugees” after the war, and to compensate individual Jews, via the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, for losses in Jewish livelihood and property resulting from Nazi persecution.   read more…

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