Konstanz New Synagogue

9 November 2020 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

New Synagogue © Waithamai/cc-by-sa-4.0

New Synagogue © Waithamai/cc-by-sa-4.0

The synagogue in Konstanz, the district town of the district of Konstanz in Baden-Württemberg, was built in 1882/1883 and destroyed during the November pogroms in 1938. This first synagogue was on Sigismundstrasse. A new building was inaugurated in 2019. The Jewish community of Konstanz tried to build a synagogue from 1872. The property at Sigismundstrasse 19 was purchased from the Konstanz Hospital Foundation and, thanks to numerous donations and a loan, the financing was secured. The synagogue was built according to the plans of the architect and city builder Holzmann from Constance. The inauguration, attended by numerous representatives of the state and municipal authorities and the Christian churches, took place on September 28, 1883.   read more…

Neresheim Abbey

21 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Museums, Exhibitions

© Holger Uwe Schmitt/cc-by-sa-4.0

© Holger Uwe Schmitt/cc-by-sa-4.0

Neresheim Abbey or the Abbey of Saints Ulrich and Afra, Neresheim is located above the town of Neresheim in Baden-Württemberg, southern Germany. It is now a Benedictine monastery and is part of the Beuronese Congregation.   read more…

Karlsruhe Palace in Baden-Württemberg

8 November 2017 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Museums, Exhibitions, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks

© Jörg Schmalenberger/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Jörg Schmalenberger/cc-by-sa-3.0

Karlsruhe Palace was erected in 1715 by Margrave Charles III William of Baden-Durlach, after a dispute with the citizens of his previous capital, Durlach. The city of Karlsruhe has since grown around it. It is now home to the main museum of the Badisches Landesmuseum Karlsruhe. The first building was constructed by Jakob Friedrich von Batzendorf. The city was planned with the tower of the palace (Schloss) at the centre and 32 streets radiating out from it like spokes on a wheel, or ribs on a folding fan, so that a nickname for Karlsruhe in German is the “fan city” (Fächerstadt).   read more…

Federal Constitutional Court

1 March 2017 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month

© Dr. Ronald Kunze/cc-by-3.0

© Dr. Ronald Kunze/cc-by-3.0

The Federal Constitutional Court (German: Bundesverfassungsgericht; abbreviated: BVerfG) is the supreme constitutional court for the Federal Republic of Germany, established by the constitution or Basic Law (Grundgesetz) of Germany. Since its inception with the beginning of the post-WW2 republic, the court has been located in the city of Karlsruhe—intentionally distanced from the other federal institutions in Berlin (earlier in Bonn) and other cities. The main task of the court is judicial review, and it may declare legislation unconstitutional, thus rendering them ineffective. In this respect, it is similar to other supreme courts with judicial review powers, yet the court possesses a number of additional powers, and is regarded as among the most interventionist and powerful national courts in the world. Unlike other supreme courts, the constitutional court is not an integral stage of the judicial or appeals process (aside from cases concerning constitutional or public international law), and does not serve as a regular appellate court from lower courts or the Federal Supreme Courts on any violation of federal laws.   read more…

Böblingen in Baden-Württemberg

29 September 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

City Square © Jessica Kemper

City Square © Jessica Kemper

Böblingen is the seat of Böblingen District. Physically Sindelfingen and Böblingen are continuous. In 1962, Böblingen was designated a Große Kreisstadt (major district town). Its current boundaries were established in 1971 when it was merged with the municipality of Dagersheim.   read more…

The university city of Heidelberg

5 September 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Heidelberg © flickr.com - whobee

Heidelberg © flickr.com – whobee

Heidelberg is a city in south-west Germany. The fifth-largest city in the State of Baden-Württemberg after Stuttgart, Mannheim, Karlsruhe and Freiburg im Breisgau, Heidelberg is part of the densely-populated Rhine-Neckar Metropolitan Region. In 2009, over 145,000 people lived in the city. Heidelberg lies on the River Neckar in a steep valley in the Odenwald.   read more…

The Titisee in the Black Forest

3 September 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

© Ignaz Wiradi/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Ignaz Wiradi/cc-by-sa-3.0

Titisee is a lake in the southern Black Forest in Baden-Württemberg. It is said it got its name from Roman Emperor Titus. It covers an area of 1.07 km² and has an average depth of 20 m. It owes its creation to the Feldberg glacier, the moraine ploughed up by which in the Pleistocene epoch nowadays forms the lake’s shores.   read more…

The Lake Constance

19 May 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Lindau Island © Edda Praefcke

Lindau Island © Edda Praefcke

Lake Constance (German: Bodensee) is a lake on the Rhine at the northern foot of the Alps, and consists of three bodies of water: the Obersee (“upper lake”), the Untersee (“lower lake”), and a connecting stretch of the Rhine, called the Seerhein. The lake is situated in Germany, Switzerland and Austria near the Alps. Specifically, its shorelines lie in the German federal-states of Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg, the Austrian federal-state of Vorarlberg, and the Swiss cantons of Thurgau and St. Gallen. The Rhine flows into it from the south following the Austro-Swiss frontier. Car ferries link Romanshorn, Switzerland to Friedrichshafen, and Konstanz to Meersburg.   read more…

Schwaebisch Hall in the Kocher Valley

5 March 2015 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Historic town centre © Re-Zensor

Historic town centre © Re-Zensor

Schwäbisch Hall (or Hall for short) is a town in the state of Baden-Württemberg and capital of the district of Schwäbisch Hall. The town is located in the valley of the river Kocher in the north-eastern part of Baden-Württemberg. The first part of the name, “Schwäbisch” refers to the name of the region, Swabia. The most probable origin of the second part of the name “Hall” is a west Germanic word family that means “drying something by heating it”, likely referring to the salt production method of heating salty groundwater. The salt mine closed in 1925. As of December 31, 2009, Schwäbisch Hall has a population of 36,799. The residents of Schwäbisch Hall come from over 100 countries. Schwäbisch Hall has a mix of historic and modern buildings.   read more…

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