Princeton in New Jersey

Monday, 26 August 2019 - 11:00 am (CET/MEZ) Berlin | Author/Destination:
Category/Kategorie: General, Universities, Colleges, Academies
Reading Time:  4 minutes

Princeton University Boat House at Lake Carnegie © Jerrye & Roy Klotz, MD/cc-by-sa-3.0

Princeton University Boat House at Lake Carnegie © Jerrye & Roy Klotz, MD/cc-by-sa-3.0

Princeton is a municipality with a borough form of government in Mercer County, New Jersey, that was established in its current form on January 1, 2013, through the consolidation of the Borough of Princeton and Princeton Township. As of the 2010 United States Census, the municipality’s population was 28,572, reflecting the former township’s population of 16,265, along with the 12,307 in the former borough. Princeton is roughly equidistant from New York City and Philadelphia. It is close to many major highways that serve both cities (e.g. Interstate 95 and US Route 1), and receives major television and radio broadcasts from each. It is also close to Trenton, New Jersey’s capital city, and Edison.

Princeton was founded before the American Revolution. It is the home of Princeton University, which bears its name and moved to the community in 1756 from its previous location in Newark. Although its association with the university is primarily what makes Princeton a college town, other important institutions in the area include the Institute for Advanced Study, Westminster Choir College, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton Theological Seminary, Opinion Research Corporation, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Siemens Corporate Research, SRI International, FMC Corporation, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Amrep, Church and Dwight, Berlitz International, and Dow Jones & Company.

Nassau Street © Djkeddie/cc-by-sa-4.0 Nassau Inn from Palmer Square © Djkeddie/cc-by-sa-4.0 Nassau Hall © Dmadeo/cc-by-sa-3.0 A Little Taste Of Cuba © Tabaquero Fresh Oysters at Colonial_Club © YuChristopherJ/cc-by-sa-4.0 Princeton University Boat House at Lake Carnegie © Jerrye & Roy Klotz, MD/cc-by-sa-3.0
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Princeton University Boat House at Lake Carnegie © Jerrye & Roy Klotz, MD/cc-by-sa-3.0
The New Jersey governor’s official residence has been in Princeton since 1945, when Morven in what was then Princeton Borough became the first Governor’s mansion. It was later replaced by the larger Drumthwacket, a colonial mansion located in the former Township. Morven became a museum property of the New Jersey Historical Society.

Princeton was ranked 15th of the top 100 towns in the United States to Live and Work In by Money Magazine in 2005. Throughout much of its history, the community was composed of two separate municipalities: a township and a borough. The central borough was completely surrounded by the township. The borough seceded from the township in 1894 in a dispute over school taxes; the two municipalities later formed the Princeton Public Schools, and some other public services were conducted together before they were reunited into a single Princeton in January 2013. Princeton Borough contained Nassau Street, the main commercial street, most of the University campus, and incorporated most of the urban area until the postwar suburbanization. The borough and township had roughly equal populations.

Read more on Princeton, VisitPrinceton.org, PrincetonOnline.com, Princeton University, Wikivoyage Princeton and Wikipedia Princeton (Smart Traveler App by U.S. Department of State - Weather report by weather.com - Global Passport Power Rank - Travel Risk Map - Democracy Index - GDP according to IMF, UN, and World Bank - Global Competitiveness Report - Corruption Perceptions Index - Press Freedom Index - World Justice Project - Rule of Law Index - UN Human Development Index - Global Peace Index - Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Index). Photos by Wikimedia Commons. If you have a suggestion, critique, review or comment to this blog entry, we are looking forward to receive your e-mail at comment@wingsch.net. Please name the headline of the blog post to which your e-mail refers to in the subject line.








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