Democracy Way in Germany

14 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  11 minutes

Frankfurter Nationalversammlung im Juni 1848 von Ludwig von Elliott

Frankfurter Nationalversammlung im Juni 1848 von Ludwig von Elliott

The Democracy Way has been a reminder of the political awakening towards democracy in the region in 1848 (German Revolution) since 7 September 2007 as a holiday and at the same time as a cultural route in southwest Germany, modeled on other tourist routes such as the Castle Road or Upper Swabian Baroque Route. It is approx. 280 km long between Freiburg im Breisgau (South Baden) and Frankfurt am Main (Hesse). The subject of “democracy in Germany” is discussed in school lessons, but very few can look back on relatives in their own families who were involved in the efforts at that time. When visiting the places along the Democracy Way, identification opportunities are offered that show that democracy is made by people and does not fall from the sky. There are many monuments on it that remind of individual participants. However, some are more or less anonymous communal graves of the “insurgents” who were shot at the time. The word “Prussia”, on the other hand, still smacks of the intervention troops (federal troops) of that time in Baden. So far there are a total of 63 stations on this history route. Through a better museum didactic, connections should be made comprehensible. The aim is to show what democracy meant in 19th century Germany.   read more…

Rapid City in South Dakota

12 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  8 minutes

Firehouse Brewing Company © flickr.com - Nick Amoscato/cc-by-2.0

Firehouse Brewing Company © flickr.com – Nick Amoscato/cc-by-2.0

Rapid City (Lakota: “Swift Water City”) is the second most populous city in South Dakota and the county seat of Pennington County. Named after Rapid Creek, where the settlement developed, it is in western South Dakota, on the Black Hills‘ eastern slope. As of 2019, the population was estimated at 77,500.   read more…

Antakya in Turkey

9 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Union for the Mediterranean Reading Time:  9 minutes

© flickr.com - maarten sepp2011/cc-by-sa-2.0

© flickr.com – maarten sepp2011/cc-by-sa-2.0

Antakya, historically known as Antioch, is the capital of Hatay Province, the southernmost province of Turkey. The city is located in a well-watered and fertile valley on the Orontes River, about 20 kilometers (12 mi) from the Levantine Sea. The cuisine of Antakya is renowned. Its cuisine is considered levantine rather than Turkish. The cuisine offers plenty of meals, where beef and lambs are mainly used. Popular dishes include the typical Turkish kebab, served with spices and onions in flat unleavened bread, with yoghurt as ali nazik kebab, oruk, kaytaz böreği and katıklı ekmek . Hot spicy food is a feature of this part of Turkey, along with Turkish coffee and local specialities.   read more…

Yarkon Park in Tel Aviv

7 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks, Union for the Mediterranean Reading Time:  4 minutes

Hadar Yossef National Sports Center © Little Savage/cc-by-sa-4.0

Hadar Yossef National Sports Center © Little Savage/cc-by-sa-4.0

Yarkon Park is a large park in Tel Aviv, Israel, with about sixteen million visits annually. Named after the Yarkon River which flows through it, the park includes extensive lawns, sports facilities, botanical gardens, an aviary, a water park, two outdoor concert venues and lakes.   read more…

Golders Green in London

5 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London Reading Time:  7 minutes

Golders Hill Park © geograph.org.uk - Martin Addison/cc-by-sa-2.0

Golders Hill Park © geograph.org.uk – Martin Addison/cc-by-sa-2.0

Golders Green is an area in the London Borough of Barnet in England. A smaller suburban linear settlement, near a farm and public grazing area green of medieval origins, dates to the early 19th century. Its bulk forms a late 19th-century and early 20th-century suburb with a commercial crossroads. The rest is of later build. It is centred approximately 6 miles (9 km) north west of Charing Cross on the intersection of Golders Green Road and Finchley Road.   read more…

Fourth of July, Independence Day in the United States

4 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  17 minutes

Fourth of July at the U.S. Capitol © flickr.com - Architect of the Capitol

Fourth of July at the U.S. Capitol © flickr.com – Architect of the Capitol

Independence Day (colloquially the Fourth of July or July 4) is a federal holiday in the United States commemorating the Declaration of Independence of the United States, on July 4, 1776. The Continental Congress declared that the thirteen American colonies were no longer subject (and subordinate) to the monarch of Britain, King George III, and were now united, free, and independent states. The Congress had voted to declare independence two days earlier, on July 2, but it was not declared until July 4. Independence Day is commonly associated with fireworks, parades, barbecues, carnivals, fairs, picnics, concerts, baseball games, family reunions, political speeches, and ceremonies, in addition to various other public and private events celebrating the history, government, and traditions of the United States. Independence Day is the national day of the United States.   read more…

Waco in Texas

2 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  8 minutes

22-story ALICO building © flickr.com - Austrini/cc-by-sa-2.0

22-story ALICO building © flickr.com – Austrini/cc-by-sa-2.0

Waco is the county seat of McLennan County, Texas, United States. It is situated along the Brazos River and I-35, halfway between Dallas and Austin. The city had a 2010 population of 124,805, making it the 22nd-most populous city in the state. The 2019 population estimate for the city was 139,236. The Waco metropolitan statistical area consists of McLennan and Falls counties, which had a 2010 population of 234,906. Falls County was added to the Waco MSA in 2013. The 2019 U.S. census population estimate for the Waco metropolitan area was 273,920.   read more…

The brig Roald Amundsen

1 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Tall ships, Yacht of the Month Reading Time:  9 minutes

at Kieler Woche 2007 © VollwertBIT/cc-by-sa-2.5

at Kieler Woche 2007 © VollwertBIT/cc-by-sa-2.5

Roald Amundsen (often abbreviated Roald; named in honor of Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen), originally named Vilm, is a German steel-ship built on the Elbe River in 1952. Having worked in different areas, she was refitted in 1992 to 1993 as a brig (two-masted square-rigged sailing ship) and now serves as a sail training ship. During summer, she usually operates in the Baltic Sea, and usually embarks for journeys to farther destinations for winter, including several trans-Atlantic crossings.   read more…

Faneuil Hall in Boston

1 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month Reading Time:  2 minutes

© flickr.com - Kevin Rutherford/cc-by-sa-2.0

© flickr.com – Kevin Rutherford/cc-by-sa-2.0

Faneuil Hall is a marketplace and meeting hall located near the waterfront and today’s Government Center, in Boston, Massachusetts. Opened in 1743, it was the site of several speeches by Samuel Adams, James Otis, and others encouraging independence from Great Britain. It is now part of Boston National Historical Park and a well-known stop on the Freedom Trail. It is sometimes referred to as “the Cradle of Liberty”. In 2008, Faneuil Hall was rated number 4 in “America’s 25 Most Visited Tourist Sites” by Forbes Traveler.   read more…

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