Martha’s Vineyard on the Atlantic

Saturday, 19 December 2015 - 01:00 pm (CET/MEZ) Berlin | Author/Destination:
Category/Kategorie: General, Bon appétit
Reading Time:  6 minutes

Dock on Martha's Vineyard © flickr.com - m01229/cc-by-2.0

Dock on Martha’s Vineyard © flickr.com – m01229/cc-by-2.0

Martha’s Vineyard is an island located south of Cape Cod in Massachusetts, known for being an affluent summer colony. It is accessible only by boat and air. It includes the smaller Chappaquiddick Island. Martha’s Vineyard is part of a chain of islands known as the Outer Lands. The island is a part of Dukes County, which also includes Cuttyhunk, as well as the island of Nomans Land, the latter of which is currently a US Wildlife preserve closed to the public. Martha’s Vineyard is divided into six towns. Each town is governed by a board of selectmen elected by town voters, along with annual and periodic town meetings. Each town is also a member of the Martha’s Vineyard Commission, which regulates island-wide building, environmental, and aesthetic concerns. Each town also follows certain regulations from Dukes County.

The towns are:

  • Tisbury, which includes the main village of Vineyard Haven, and the West Chop peninsula. It is the island’s primary port of entry for people and cargo, supplemented by the seasonal port in Oak Bluffs.
  • Edgartown, which includes Chappaquiddick Island and Katama. Edgartown is noted for its rich whaling tradition, and is the island’s largest town by population and area. It is one of the island’s “wet” towns.
  • Oak Bluffs is most well known for its gingerbread cottages, open harbor, and its vibrant town along busy Circuit Avenue. Oak Bluffs enjoys a reputation as one of the more active night-life towns on the island for both residents and tourists, and is also a “wet” town. It was known as “Cottage City” from its separation from Edgartown in 1880 until its reincorporation as Oak Bluffs in 1907. Oak Bluffs includes several communities that have been popular destinations for affluent African Americans since the early 20th century. It also includes the East Chop peninsula, Lagoon Heights and Harthaven.
  • West Tisbury is the island’s agricultural center, and hosts the well known Martha’s Vineyard Agricultural Fair in late August each year.
  • Chilmark, including the fishing village of Menemsha. Chilmark is also rural and features the island’s hilliest terrain. It is the birthplace of George Claghorn, master shipbuilder of the USS Constitution, a.k.a. “Old Ironsides”.
  • Aquinnah is home to the Wampanoag people tribe and clay cliffs.

Sailboat on Edgartown Harbor © Robert Havasy/cc-by-sa-3.0 Martha's Vineyard Cottages at Wesleyan Grove © flickr.com - Michele Schaffer/cc-by-2.0 Chappaquiddick Ferry 'On Time II' © Arwcheek/cc-by-sa-4.0 Edgartown Harbor Light © Elkman/cc-by-sa-4.0 Edgartown Town Hall © John Phelan/cc-by-3.0 Vineyard Haven Terminal © John Phelan/cc-by-sa-3.0 Dock on Martha's Vineyard © flickr.com - m01229/cc-by-2.0
<
>
Martha's Vineyard Cottages at Wesleyan Grove © flickr.com - Michele Schaffer/cc-by-2.0
The Vineyard grew as a tourist destination primarily because of its very pleasant summer weather (during summers, the temperature rarely breaks 32 °C / 90 °F) and many beautiful beaches. It is primarily a place where people go to relax. Most social life and activity takes place at people’s houses, not in the very small towns. During the whaling era, wealthy Boston sea captains and merchant traders often created estates on Martha’s Vineyard with their trading profits. Today, the Vineyard has become one of the Northeast’s most prominent summering havens, having attracted numerous celebrity regulars. The island now has a year-round population of about 15,000 people in six towns; in summer, the population increases to 100,000 residents, with more than 25,000 additional short-term visitors coming and going on the ferries during the summer season. The most crowded weekend is July 4, followed by the late-August weekend of the Agricultural Fair. In general, the summer season runs from June through Labor Day weekend, coinciding with the months most American children are not in school.

In 1985, the two islands of Martha’s Vineyard and Chappaquiddick Island were included in a new American Viticultural Area designation for wine appellation of origin specification: Martha’s Vineyard AVA. Wines produced from grapes grown on the two islands can be sold with labels that carry the Martha’s Vineyard AVA designation. Martha’s Vineyard was the home to the winemaker Chicama Vineyards in West Tisbury, though it closed after 37 years on August 10, 2008. Other popular attractions include the annual Grand Illumination in Oak Bluffs; the Martha’s VIneyard Film Center, an arthouse cinema operated by the non-profit Martha’s Vineyard Film Society, which screens independent and world cinema all year long; the Martha’s Vineyard Film Festival, which runs a winter film festival in March, a Summer Film Series and Cinema Circus every Wednesday in July and August, the Martha’s Vineyard African-American Film Festival, which showcases the works of independent and established African-American filmmakers in August, and Martha’s Vineyard International Film Festival in September; the Farm Institute at Katama Farm in Edgartown; and the Flying Horses Carousel in Oak Bluffs, the oldest operating platform carousel in the United States.

Read more on Marthas-Vineyard.com, Martha’s Vineyard Online, Martha’s Vineyard Chamber of Commerce, Vineyard Gazette, Island Queen, a Martha’s Vineyard ferry and Wikipedia Martha’s Vineyard (Smart Traveler App by U.S. Department of State - Weather report by weather.com - Global Passport Power Rank - Travel Risk Map - Democracy Index - GDP according to IMF, UN, and World Bank - Global Competitiveness Report - Corruption Perceptions Index - Press Freedom Index - World Justice Project - Rule of Law Index - UN Human Development Index - Global Peace Index - Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Index). Photos by Wikimedia Commons. If you have a suggestion, critique, review or comment to this blog entry, we are looking forward to receive your e-mail at comment@wingsch.net. Please name the headline of the blog post to which your e-mail refers to in the subject line.




Recommended posts:

Share this post: (Please note data protection regulations before using buttons)

Theme Week Lorraine

Theme Week Lorraine

[caption id="attachment_152238" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Quiche Lorraine © Arnaud 25/cc-by-sa-4.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Lorraine (German: Lothringen) is a cultural and historical region in north-eastern France. From 1982 until January 2016, Lorraine was an administrative region of France, when it became part of the new region Alsace-Champagne-Ardenne-Lorraine. Lorraine's name stems from the medieval kingdom of Lotharingia, which in turn was named for either Emperor Lothair I or King Lothair II. It became later the D...

[ read more ]

Theme Week New Zealand - The Hen and Chicken Islands

Theme Week New Zealand - The Hen and Chicken Islands

[caption id="attachment_153673" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Panorama of the Hen (right) and Chicken Islands and Sail Rock (left) © Glenn h/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The Hen and Chicken Islands lie to the east of the North Auckland Peninsula off the coast of northern New Zealand. They lie 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) east of Bream Head and 40 kilometres (25 mi) south-east of Whangarei. These islands were named by Captain James Cook, who first sighted them in 1769. It has been suggested that the name was inspi...

[ read more ]

The port city of Brest

The port city of Brest

[caption id="attachment_153751" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Rue Saint-Malo maisons © Moreau.henri[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Brest is a city in the Finistère department in Brittany in northwestern France. Located in a sheltered position not far from the western tip of the Breton peninsula, and the western extremity of metropolitan France, Brest is an important harbour and the second French military port after Toulon. The city is located at one of the occidental edges of continental Europe, hence the expression «Europe fro...

[ read more ]

Des Moines in Iowa

Des Moines in Iowa

[caption id="attachment_165079" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Des Moines skyline at night © Shimo[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Des Moines is the capital and the most populous city in the U.S. state of Iowa. It is also the county seat of Polk County. A small portion of the city extends into Warren County. It was incorporated on September 22, 1851, as Fort Des Moines, which was shortened to "Des Moines" in 1857. It is located on and named after the Des Moines River, which likely was adapted from the French colonial name, Rivière...

[ read more ]

Islay, Scotland's whiskey island

Islay, Scotland's whiskey island

[caption id="attachment_239372" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Main street of Bowmore © panoramio.com - Martin Cígler/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Islay (Scottish Gaelic: Ìle, Scots: Ila) is the southernmost island of the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. Known as "The Queen of the Hebrides", it lies in Argyll just south west of Jura and around 40 kilometres (22 nautical miles) north of the Northern Irish coast. The island's capital is Bowmore where the distinctive round Kilarrow Parish Church and a distillery are locat...

[ read more ]

Nahariya in the North District of Israel

Nahariya in the North District of Israel

[caption id="attachment_152017" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Beach at Nahariya Promenade © Maor X/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Nahariya is the northernmost coastal city in the Northern District of Israel, with an estimated population of 51,200. Nahariya takes its name from the stream of Ga'aton Rriver, that bisects it. Nahariya is home to some of Israel's leading entrepreneurs: the Strauss, Soglowek and Wertheimer families. Successful private sector industrial enterprises founded in Nahariya are the Strauss dairy ...

[ read more ]

Lüderitz in Namibia

Lüderitz in Namibia

[caption id="attachment_24654" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Lüderitz, seen from Nautilusberg (Mount Nautilus) © Peter Stenglein/cc-by-sa-2.5[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Lüderitz is a harbour town in south-west Namibia, lying on one of the least hospitable coasts in Africa. It is a port developed around Robert Harbour and Shark Island. The town is known for its colonial architecture, including some Art Nouveau work, and for wildlife including seals, penguins, flamingos and ostriches. It is also home to a museum, and lies at ...

[ read more ]

Melbourne City in Australia

Melbourne City in Australia

[caption id="attachment_223175" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Melbourne's Central Business District © Melbpal/cc-by-sa-4.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Melbourne is the capital and most-populous city of the Australian state of Victoria, and the second-most populous city in both Australia and Oceania. Its name generally refers to a 9,993 km²(3,858 sq mi) metropolitan area known as Greater Melbourne, comprising an urban agglomeration of 31 local municipalities, although the name is also used specifically for the local municipali...

[ read more ]

Cavalaire-sur-Mer on the Côte d’Azur

Cavalaire-sur-Mer on the Côte d’Azur

[caption id="attachment_152662" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Bay of Cavalaire © Starus/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Cavalaire-sur-Mer is a commune in the Var department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region in southeastern France. Cavalaire has a marina with 1200 berths. Cavalaire is located on the French Riviera between Saint-Tropez and Le Lavandou on the Mediterranean coast in the Bay of Cavalaire. In the hinterland rises the Massif des Maures. Nice to the east and Marseille to the west are both a...

[ read more ]

Île de la Cité

Île de la Cité

[caption id="attachment_163538" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © GuidoR/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The Île de la Cité is one of two remaining natural islands in the Seine within the city of Paris (the other being the Île Saint-Louis). It is the centre of Paris and the location where the medieval city was refounded. The western end has held a palace since Merovingian times, and its eastern end since the same period has been consecrated to religion, especially after the 10th-century construction of a cathedral pr...

[ read more ]

Return to TopReturn to Top
John Lennon Memorial in Cuba © Christopher Hughes/cc-by-sa-3.0-us
Vedado in Havana

Vedado is a central business district and urban neighborhood in the city of Havana, Cuba. Bordered on the east by...

Flatiron District © flickr.com - Dave Lindblom/cc-by-2.0
The Flatiron District in Manhattan

The Flatiron District is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, named after the Flatiron Building at...

Lido vaporetto terminal © Gary Houston
Theme Week Venice – Lido di Venezia

The Lido – or Venice Lido (Lido di Venezia) – is an 11-kilometre (7-mile) long sandbar in Venice, northern Italy;...

Close