Market place Jemaa el-Fnaa in Marrakesh

Wednesday, 10 June 2020 - 11:00 am (CET/MEZ) Berlin | Author/Destination:
Category/Kategorie: General, UNESCO World Heritage, Union for the Mediterranean
Reading Time:  10 minutes

© Boris Macek/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Boris Macek/cc-by-sa-3.0

Jemaa el-Fnaa is a square and market place in Marrakesh‘s medina quarter (old city). It remains the main square of Marrakesh, used by locals and tourists. Marrakesh was founded by the Almoravid Dynasty in 1070 by Abu Bakr ibn Umar and subsequently developed by his successors. Initially, the city’s two main monuments and focal points were the fortress known as Ksar el-Hajjar (“fortress of stone”) and the city’s first Friday mosque (the site of the future Ben Youssef Mosque). The Ksar el-Hajjar was located directly north of today’s Koutoubia Mosque. The major souk (market) streets of the city thus developed along the roads linking these two important sites and still correspond to the main axis of souks today. At one end of this axis, next to the Ksar el-Hajjar, a large open space existed for temporary and weekly markets. This space was initially known as Rahbat al-Ksar (“the place of the fortress”). Other historical records refer to it as as-Saha al-Kubra (“the grand square”), or simply as as-Saha or ar-Rahba.

The Almoravid emir Ali ibn Yusuf (ruled 1106-1143) soon afterwards constructed a palace directly south of and adjacent to the Ksar el-Hajjar, on the actual site of the later Koutoubia Mosque. One part of this palace was a monumental stone gate on its east side which faced towards the Rahbat al-Ksar. The gate likely played a symbolic role: it was the entrance to the palace for those seeking an audience with the sovereign, and it’s possible the ruler himself would sit, enthroned, before the gate and publicly dispense justice on a weekly basis (a tradition which existed among other Moroccan and Andalusian ruling dynasties). The importance of the great public square in front of the royal palace thus led it to become the place for public executions, military parades, festivals, and other public events until long afterwards.

After a destructive struggle, Marrakech fell to the Almohads in 1147. Following this, Jamaa el-Fna was renovated along with much of the city. The city walls were also extended by Abu Yacoub Yusuf and particularly by Yacoub el Mansour from 1147–1158. The mosques, palace, hospital, parade ground and gardens around the edges of the marketplace were also overhauled, and a new royal kasbah (citadel) was erected further south. As the Almohad rulers moved to the new kasbah, the old Almoravid palace and fortress fell out of use and was eventually torn down (in part to make way for the new Koutoubia Mosque). Subsequently, with the fortunes of the city, the Jemaa el-Fna saw periods of decline and also renewal.

Despite the encroachment of new constructions on the edge of the square over time, it never disappeared due to its role as an open market area and as the site of public events. One attempt to fill a large part of the square is reported to have been made by the Saadian sultan Ahmad al-Mansour who attempted to build a monumental mosque in the square. The mosque would have likely followed the same model as the Bab Doukkala and Mouassine Mosques, being deliberately built in the midst of major traffic routes in the city, and would have been accompanied by a number of attendant civic and religious buildings. The mosque was never finished, however, possibly due to disasters like the plague epidemics during al-Mansour’s reign. Construction was abandoned part-way through and what had been built fell into ruin and was taken over by market stalls and other occupants. (It is probably also the site of a modern shop complex, Souk Jdid, just north of the food-stalls today, whose outline has the same compass orientation as the mosques of al-Mansour’s time.) This ruined mosque may have given the square its current name, Jemaa el-Fna (“Mosque of Ruins”).

© flickr.com - Mario Micklisch/cc-by-2.0 © flickr.com - Mario Micklisch/cc-by-2.0 Jemaa_el-Fnaa-Boris_Macek-cc-by-sa-3.0 © flickr.com - Jorge Láscar/cc-by-2.0 © Max221B/cc-by-sa-4.0 Snake charmer © Arnaud 25/cc-by-sa-3.0
<
>
© flickr.com - Mario Micklisch/cc-by-2.0
During the day it is predominantly occupied by orange juice stalls, water sellers with traditional leather water-bags and brass cups, youths with chained Barbary apes and snake charmers despite the protected status of these species under Moroccan law. As the day progresses, the entertainment on offer changes: the snake charmers depart, and late in the day the square becomes more crowded, with Chleuh dancing-boys (it would be against custom for girls to provide such entertainment), story-tellers (telling their tales in Berber or Arabic, to an audience of locals), magicians, and peddlers of traditional medicines. As darkness falls, the square fills with dozens of food-stalls as the number of people on the square peaks. The square is edged along one side by the Marrakesh souk, a traditional North African market catering both for the common daily needs of the locals, and for the tourist trade. On other sides are hotels and gardens and cafe terraces, and narrow streets lead into the alleys of the medina quarter. Once a bus station, the place was closed to vehicle traffic in the early 2000s. The authorities are well aware of its importance to the tourist trade, and a strong but discreet police presence ensures the safety of visitors.

The idea of the UNESCO project Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity came from people concerned about the Jamaa el Fna. The place is known for its active concentration of traditional activities by storytellers, musicians and performers, but it was threatened by economic development pressures. In fighting for the protection of traditions, the residents called for action on an international level. To recognize the need for the protection of such places — termed “cultural spaces” — and other popular and traditional forms of cultural expression. UNESCO encourages communities to identify, document, protect, promote and revitalize such heritage. The UNESCO label aims to raise awareness about the importance of oral and intangible heritage as an essential component of cultural diversity.

The spectacle of Jamaa el Fna is repeated daily and each day it is different. Everything changes — voices, sounds, gestures, the public which sees, listens, smells, tastes, touches. The oral tradition is framed by one much vaster — that we can call intangible. The Square, as a physical space, shelters a rich oral and intangible tradition.
Juan Goytisolo, in a speech delivered at the opening meeting for the First Proclamation, 15 May 2001

Read more on LonelyPlanet.com – Djemaa El Fna, Wikipedia Marrakesh and Wikipedia Jemaa el-Fnaa (Smart Traveler App by U.S. Department of State - Weather report by weather.com - Johns Hopkins University & Medicine - Coronavirus Resource Center - Global Passport Power Rank - Democracy Index - GDP according to IMF, UN, and World Bank - Global Competitiveness Report - Corruption Perceptions Index - Press Freedom Index - World Justice Project - Rule of Law Index - UN Human Development Index - Global Peace Index - Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Index). Photos by Wikimedia Commons. If you have a suggestion, critique, review or comment to this blog entry, we are looking forward to receive your e-mail at comment@wingsch.net. Please name the headline of the blog post to which your e-mail refers to in the subject line.








Recommended posts:

Share this post: (Please note data protection regulations before using buttons)

Carnaby Street in London

Carnaby Street in London

[caption id="attachment_196614" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © SisterLondon/cc-by-sa-4.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Carnaby Street is a pedestrianised shopping street in Soho in the City of Westminster, Central London. Close to Oxford Street and Regent Street, it is home to fashion and lifestyle retailers, including a large number of independent fashion boutiques. Streets crossing, or meeting with, Carnaby Street are, from south to north, Beak Street, Broadwick Street, Kingly Court, Ganton Street, Marlborough Court, Lowndes ...

[ read more ]

Munich Documentation Centre for the History of National Socialism

Munich Documentation Centre for the History of National Socialism

[caption id="attachment_232261" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © flickr.com - Fred Romero/cc-by-2.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The NS-Dokumentationszentrum is a museum in the Maxvorstadt area of Munich, Germany, which focuses on the history and consequences of the Nazi regime and the role of Munich as Hauptstadt der Bewegung (′capital of the movement′). In December 2005 the government of Bavaria announced that the museum would be situated at the site of the former Brown House, the Nazi Party headquarters, which pla...

[ read more ]

Chapel of Saint Michel d’Aiguilhe in France

Chapel of Saint Michel d’Aiguilhe in France

[caption id="attachment_210065" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © W. Bulach/cc-by-sa-4.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Saint-Michel d'Aiguilhe (St. Michael of the Needle) is a chapel in Aiguilhe, near Le Puy-en-Velay in France. The chapel is reached by 268 steps carved into the rock. It was built in 969 on a volcanic plug 85 metres (279 ft) high. The surface on top of the plug is 57 metres (187 ft) in diameter. Bishop Godescalc of Le Puy-en-Velay had the chapel built to celebrate his return from the pilgrimage of Saint Jam...

[ read more ]

Museum of Witchcraft and Magic in Cornwall

Museum of Witchcraft and Magic in Cornwall

[caption id="attachment_232379" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Museum of Witchcraft and Magic © JUweL/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The Museum of Witchcraft and Magic, formerly known as the Museum of Witchcraft, is a museum dedicated to European witchcraft and magic located in the village of Boscastle in Cornwall, south-west England. It houses exhibits devoted to folk magic, ceremonial magic, Freemasonry, and Wicca, with its collection of such objects having been described as the largest in the world. The mus...

[ read more ]

Theme Week East Anglia

Theme Week East Anglia

[caption id="attachment_151480" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Burghley House in Peterborough © flickr.com - Anthony Masi/cc-by-2.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]East Anglia is one of three constituent parts of the East of England – a first level region. The name has also been applied to the ancient Anglo-Saxon kingdom of the East Angles. The region's name is derived from the Angles – a tribe that originated in Angeln, northern Germany. The region comprises four areas of local government: the administrative counties of Norfol...

[ read more ]

Brenners Park-Hotel & Spa in Baden-Baden

Brenners Park-Hotel & Spa in Baden-Baden

[caption id="attachment_192706" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © panoramio.com - Baden de/cc-by-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Brenners Park-Hotel & Spa is a five star hotel belonging to the Oetker Hotel Management Company Brenners Park-Hotel GmbH on the Lichtentaler Allee in Baden-Baden. Run by the Oetker Collection brand, the hotel is one of the Leading Hotels of the World. In 1834, the history of the hotel began under the name Stephanienbad. The name was a homage to Princess Stephanie of Baden, adoptive daughter of ...

[ read more ]

Sevilla, the artistic, historical, cultural and economic capital of southern Spain

Sevilla, the artistic, historical, cultural and economic capital of southern Spain

[caption id="attachment_160543" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Avenida de la Constitución © Anual[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Seville is the artistic, historic, cultural, and financial capital of southern Spain. It is the capital of the autonomous community of Andalusia and of the province of Seville. It is situated on the plain of the River Guadalquivir. The inhabitants of the city are known as sevillanos (feminine form: sevillanas) or hispalenses, following the Roman name of the city, Hispalis. The population of the city of ...

[ read more ]

The Table Bay off Cape Town

The Table Bay off Cape Town

[caption id="attachment_153618" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Table Bay with Robben Island and Cape Town from Table Mountain © AlterVista/cc-by-sa-3.0-de[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Table Bay is a natural bay on the Atlantic Ocean overlooked by Cape Town (founded 1652 by Van Riebeeck) and is at the northern end of the Cape Peninsula, which stretches south to the Cape of Good Hope. It was named because it is dominated by the flat-topped Table Mountain. Bartolomeu Dias was the first European to explore this region in 148...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Miami & the Beaches

Theme Week Miami & the Beaches

[caption id="attachment_4164" align="aligncenter" width="590" caption="South Beach - Ocean Drive © chensiyuan"][/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Miami is a city located on the Atlantic coast in southeastern Florida and the county seat of Miami-Dade County, the most populous county in Florida and the eighth-most populous county in the United States with a population of 2,500,625. The 42nd largest city proper in the United States, with a population of 399,457, it is the principal, central, and most populous city of the South Florida met...

[ read more ]

Antebellum architecture of the Southern United States

Antebellum architecture of the Southern United States

[caption id="attachment_192521" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Rosedown Plantation House in St. Francisville, Louisiana © Z28scrambler/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Antebellum architecture (meaning "prewar", from the Latin ante, "before", and bellum, "war") is the neoclassical architectural style characteristic of the 19th-century Southern United States, especially the Deep South, from after the birth of the United States with the American Revolution, to the start of the American Civil War. Antebellum architecture is...

[ read more ]

Return to TopReturn to Top
© Julian Herzog/cc-by-4.0
Copenhagen Opera House

The Copenhagen Opera House is the national opera house of Denmark, and among the most modern opera houses in the...

San Miguel de Cozumel © Harpqueen
Cozumel in Mexico

Cozumel is an island and municipality in the Caribbean Sea off the eastern coast of Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula, opposite Playa...

Sunrise over Ponte Vedra Beach © flickr.com - Craig ONeal/cc-by-sa-2.0
Ponte Vedra Beach in Florida

Ponte Vedra Beach is an unincorporated seaside community in St. Johns County, Florida, United States. Located eighteen miles (29 km)...

Schließen