Knoxville in Tennessee

Wednesday, 18 May 2022 - 11:00 am (CET/MEZ) Berlin | Author/Destination:
Category/Kategorie: General
Reading Time:  7 minutes

South Gay Street © Brian Stansberry/cc-by-3.0

South Gay Street © Brian Stansberry/cc-by-3.0

Knoxville is a city in and the county seat of Knox County in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2020 United States census, Knoxville’s population was 190,740, making it the largest city in the East Tennessee Grand Division and the state’s third largest city after Nashville and Memphis. Knoxville is the principal city of the Knoxville Metropolitan Statistical Area, which had an estimated population of 869,046 in 2019. Knoxville is the home of the flagship campus of the University of Tennessee, whose sports teams, the Tennessee Volunteers, are popular in the surrounding area. Knoxville is also home to the headquarters of the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Tennessee Supreme Court‘s courthouse for East Tennessee, and the corporate headquarters of several national and regional companies. As one of the largest cities in the Appalachian region, Knoxville has positioned itself in recent years as a repository of Appalachian culture and is one of the gateways to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

First settled in 1786, Knoxville was the first capital of Tennessee. The city struggled with geographic isolation throughout the early 19th century. The arrival of the railroad in 1855 led to an economic boom. The city was bitterly divided over the secession issue during the American Civil War and was occupied alternately by Confederate and Union armies, culminating in the Battle of Fort Sanders in 1863. Following the war, Knoxville grew rapidly as a major wholesaling and manufacturing center. The city’s economy stagnated after the 1920s as the manufacturing sector collapsed, the downtown area declined and city leaders became entrenched in highly partisan political fights. Hosting the 1982 World’s Fair helped reinvigorate the city, and revitalization initiatives by city leaders and private developers have had major successes in spurring growth in the city, especially the downtown area.

Downtown Knoxville © flickr.com - Will Fisher/cc-by-sa-2.0 Skyline © Nathan C. Fortner/cc-by-sa-3.0 Riviera Theatre on Gay Street © Brian Stansberry/cc-by-3.0 South Gay Street © Brian Stansberry/cc-by-3.0 World's Fair Park with the Tennessee Amphitheater and the Sunsphere © AppalachianCentrist/cc-by-sa-4.0 Tennessee Amphitheater in Knoxville © Bigmacthealmanac/cc-by-sa-4.0
<
>
World's Fair Park with the Tennessee Amphitheater and the Sunsphere © AppalachianCentrist/cc-by-sa-4.0
Knoxville’s two tallest buildings are the 27-story First Tennessee Plaza and the 24-story Riverview Tower, both on Gay Street. Other prominent high-rises include the Tower at Morgan Hill (21 stories), the Andrew Johnson Building (18), the Knoxville Hilton (18), the General Building (15), the Holston (14), the TVA Towers (12), and Sterchi Lofts (12). The city’s most iconic structure is arguably the Sunsphere, a 266-foot (81 m) steel truss tower built for the 1982 World’s Fair and, with the Tennessee Amphitheater, one of only two structures that remain from that World’s Fair. The downtown area contains a mixture of architectural styles from various periods, ranging from the hewn-log James White House (1786) to the modern Knoxville Museum of Art (1990). Styles represented include Greek Revival (Old City Hall), Victorian (Hotel St. Oliver and Sullivan’s Saloon), Gothic (Church Street Methodist Church and Ayres Hall), Neoclassical (First Baptist Church), and Art Deco (Knoxville Post Office). Gay Street, Market Square, and Jackson Avenue contain numerous examples of late-19th and early-20th century commercial architecture. Residential architecture tends to reflect the city’s development over two centuries. Blount Mansion (1791), in the oldest part of the city, is designed in a vernacular Georgian style. “Streetcar suburbs” such as Fourth and Gill, Parkridge, and Fort Sanders, developed in the late 19th century with the advent of trolleys, tend to contain large concentrations of Victorian and Bungalow/Craftsman-style houses popular during this period. Early automobile suburbs, such as Lindbergh Forest and Sequoyah Hills, contain late-1920s and 1930s styles such as Tudor Revival, English Cottage, and Mission Revival. Neighborhoods developed after World War II typically consist of Ranch-style houses. Knoxville is home to the nation’s largest concentration of homes designed by noted Victorian residential architect George Franklin Barber, who lived in the city. Other notable local architects include members of the Baumann family, Charles I. Barber (son of George), R. F. Graf, and more recently, Bruce McCarty. Nationally renowned architects with works still standing in the city include Alfred B. Mullett (Greystone), John Russell Pope (H.L. Dulin House), and Edward Larrabee Barnes (Knoxville Museum of Art).

Knoxville is home to a rich arts community and has many festivals throughout the year. Its contributions to old-time, bluegrass and country music are numerous, from Flatt & Scruggs and Homer and Jethro to the Everly Brothers (Music of East Tennessee). The Knoxville Symphony Orchestra (KSO), established in 1935, is the oldest continuing orchestra in the southeast. The KSO maintains a core of full-time professional musicians, and performs at more than 200 events per year. Its traditional venues include the Tennessee Theatre, the Bijou Theatre, and the Civic Auditorium, though it also performs at a number of non-traditional venues. The Knoxville Opera performs a season of opera every year, accompanied by a chorus. Knoxville was the location of Sergei Rachmaninoff‘s final concert in 1943, performed at Alumni Memorial Auditorium at the University of Tennessee. Knoxville’s underground music scene is rooted with the promotion by AC Entertainment founder Ashley Capps around 1979. AC Entertainment, a local entertainment group, sought to expand the city’s scene. In the 1990s, noted alternative rock critic Ann Powers, author of Weird Like Us: My Bohemian America, referred to the city as “Austin without the hype”. Knoxville is also home to a vibrant punk rock scene, having emerged from venues in the Old City district, specifically the Mill & Mine and Pilot Light venues. Its underground music scene in punk and hardcore grew as early as 1979. Such punk and hardcore bands included UXB, the STDs, and Koro. The city also hosts numerous art festivals, including the 17-day Dogwood Arts Festival in April, which features art shows, crafts fairs, food and live music. Also in April is the Rossini Festival, which celebrates opera and Italian culture. June’s Kuumba (meaning creativity in Swahili) Festival commemorates the region’s African American heritage and showcases visual arts, folk arts, dance, games, music, storytelling, theater, and food. Autumn on the Square showcases national and local artists in outdoor concert series at historic Market Square, which has been revitalized with specialty shops and residences.

Read more on VisitKnoxville.com, VisitTheUSA.com – Knoxville, Wikivoyage Knoxville and Wikipedia Knoxville (Smart Traveler App by U.S. Department of State - Weather report by weather.com - Global Passport Power Rank - Travel Risk Map - Democracy Index - GDP according to IMF, UN, and World Bank - Global Competitiveness Report - Corruption Perceptions Index - Press Freedom Index - World Justice Project - Rule of Law Index - UN Human Development Index - Global Peace Index - Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Index). Photos by Wikimedia Commons. If you have a suggestion, critique, review or comment to this blog entry, we are looking forward to receive your e-mail at comment@wingsch.net. Please name the headline of the blog post to which your e-mail refers to in the subject line.




Recommended posts:

Share this post: (Please note data protection regulations before using buttons)

Warwick on the River Avon

Warwick on the River Avon

[caption id="attachment_161116" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Warwick overview © flickr.com - David Alonso Pérez[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Warwick is the county town of Warwickshire. The town lies upon the River Avon, 11 miles (18 km) south of Coventry and just west of Leamington Spa and Whitnash with which it is conjoined. It has a population of 25,000. There has been human activity at Warwick as early as the Neolithic, and constant habitation since the 6th century. A Saxon burh was created at Warwick in the 9th ce...

[ read more ]

Europa Nostra

Europa Nostra

[caption id="attachment_235438" align="aligncenter" width="392"] Europa Nostra flag in Gulbene © Raul Kern/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Europa Nostra (Italian for "Our Europe") is a pan-European Federation for Cultural Heritage, representing citizens' organisations that work on safeguarding Europe's cultural and natural heritage. It is the voice of this movement to relevant international bodies, in particular the European Union, the Council of Europe and UNESCO. It has consultative status with UNESCO and is recognised...

[ read more ]

The Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg

The Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg

[caption id="attachment_25947" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Winter Palace at night © Robert Breuer/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The State Hermitage is a museum of art and culture in Saint Petersburg. One of the largest and oldest museums in the world, it was founded in 1764 by Catherine the Great and has been open to the public since 1852. Its collections, of which only a small part is on permanent display, comprise over three million items, including the largest collection of paintings in the world. Beside the Lo...

[ read more ]

WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF

WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF

[caption id="attachment_24726" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Building of WSL Institute for Snow and Avalange Research SLF in Davos Dorf © Capricorn4049/cc-by-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF engages in research, scientific services, teaching and public relations, focusing on snow, the atmosphere, natural hazards, permafrost and mountain ecosystems. The SLF's employees are active in both basic and applied research. The objective of their work is to develop practical i...

[ read more ]

Edinburgh - Books, beer and cookies

Edinburgh - Books, beer and cookies

[caption id="attachment_152534" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Hopetoun House © George Gastin[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Edinburgh is the capital city of Scotland, the second largest city in Scotland and the seventh-most populous in the United Kingdom. Located in the south-east of Scotland, Edinburgh lies on the east coast of the Central Belt, along the Firth of Forth, near the North Sea. Edinburgh is the seat of the Scottish Parliament. The city was one of the major centres of the Enlightenment, led by the University ...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Galicia

Theme Week Galicia

[caption id="attachment_153061" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Carnota © Luis Miguel Bugallo Sánchez/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Galicia is an autonomous community in northwest Spain, with the official status of a historic nationality. It comprises the provinces of A Coruña, Lugo, Ourense and Pontevedra, being bordered by Portugal to the south, the Spanish autonomous communities of Castile and León and Asturias to the east, and the Atlantic Ocean to the west and the north. Galicia has over 1,660 km (1,030 mi) of...

[ read more ]

Technion in Haifa

Technion in Haifa

[caption id="attachment_236671" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Aerospace Faculty © first_div[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The Technion – Israel Institute of Technology is a public research university located in Haifa, Israel. Established in 1912 under the dominion of the Ottoman Empire, the Technion is the oldest university in the country. The Technion is ranked as one of the top universities in both Israel and the Middle East, and in the world's top 100 universities in the 2022 Academic Ranking of World Universities. ...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Japan

Theme Week Japan

[caption id="attachment_192065" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Tokyo - Ginza shopping area © Jordy Meow/cc-by-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Japan (Nippon or Nihon, literally "State of Japan") is an island country in East Asia. Located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies off the eastern coast of the Asian continent and stretches from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea in the south. The kanji that make up Japan's name mean "sun origin", and it is often called the "Land of the Rising Sun". ...

[ read more ]

Huacachina Oasis in Peru

Huacachina Oasis in Peru

[caption id="attachment_214320" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © Havardtl/cc-by-4.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Huacachina is a village built around a small oasis and surrounded by sand dunes in southwestern Peru. It is about five kilometers from the city of Ica in the Ica District of Ica Province. The oasis was introduced as a feature on the back of the 50 nuevo sol note in 1991. Huacachina has a permanent population of around 100 people, although it hosts many tens of thousands of tourists each year. Huacachina is a resort g...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Morocco - Rabat

Theme Week Morocco - Rabat

[caption id="attachment_167336" align="aligncenter" width="590"] River Bou Regreg and the Kasbah of the Udayas © Elooas/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Rabat is the capital city of Morocco and its second largest city with an urban population of approximately 580,000 and a metropolitan population of over 1.2 million. It is also the capital city of the Eṛṛbaṭ-Sla-Qniṭra administrative region. The city is located on the Atlantic Ocean at the mouth of the river Bou Regreg. On the facing shore of the river lies Salé,...

[ read more ]

Return to TopReturn to Top
Park on the river © Cherubby/cc-by-sa-3.0
Yiwu in Central Zhejiang Province

Yiwu is a county-level city under the jurisdiction of Jinhua in Central Zhejiang Province, East China. As of the 2020...

Al Nakba graffiti in Nazareth © PRA/cc-by-sa-4.0
Nakba Day

The Nakba (lit.: "disaster", "catastrophe", or "cataclysm"), also known as the Palestinian Catastrophe, was the destruction of Palestinian society and...

© Bärwinkel,Klaus/cc-by-3.0
St. Nicholas Church in Potsdam

St. Nicholas Church (German: St. Nikolaikirche) in Potsdam is a Lutheran church under the Evangelical Church in Berlin, Brandenburg and...

Close