Field hockey

Friday, 3 February 2017 - 11:00 am (CET/MEZ) Berlin | Author/Destination:
Category/Kategorie: General, Sport
Reading Time:  10 minutes

Rio 2016 - Spain vs Netherlands © flickr.com - Jonas de Carvalho/cc-by-sa-2.0

Rio 2016 – Spain vs Netherlands © flickr.com – Jonas de Carvalho/cc-by-sa-2.0

Field hockey is a team sport of the hockey family. The earliest origins of the sport date back to the Middle Ages in England, Scotland, France and the Netherlands. The game can be played on a grass field or a turf field as well as an indoor board surface. Each team plays with eleven players, including the goalie. Players use sticks made out of wood, carbon fibre, fibre glass or a combination of carbon fibre and fibre glass in different quantities (with the higher carbon fibre stick being more expensive and less likely to break) to hit a round, hard, plastic ball. The length of the stick depends on the player’s individual height. Only one end of the stick is allowed to be used. Goalies often have a different kind of stick, however they can also use an ordinary field hockey stick. The specific goal-keeping sticks have another curve at the end of the stick, this is to give them more surface area to save the ball. The uniform consists of shin guards, shoes, shorts, a mouth guard and a jersey. Today, the game is played globally, with particular popularity throughout Western Europe, the Indian subcontinent, Southern Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, and parts of the United States (such as Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Kentucky, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania). Field Hockey is the national sport of India and Pakistan. The term “field hockey” is used primarily in Canada and the United States where ice hockey is more popular. In Sweden the term landhockey is used.

During play, goal keepers are the only players who are allowed to touch the ball with any part of their body (the player’s hand is considered ‘part of the stick’ if on the stick), while field players play the ball with the flat side of their stick. Goal keepers also cannot play the ball with the back of their stick. Whoever scores the most goals by the end of the match wins. If the score is tied at the end of the game, either a draw is declared or the game goes into extra time or a penalty shootout, depending on the competition’s format. There are many variations to overtime play that depend on the league and tournament play. In college play, a seven-aside overtime period consists of a 10-minute golden goal period with seven players for each team. If a tie still remains, the game enters a one-on-one competition where each team chooses 5 players to dribble from the 25 yard line down to the circle against the opposing goalie. The player has 8 seconds to score on the goalie keeping it in bounds. The play ends after a goal is scored, the ball goes out of bounds, a foul is committed (ending in either a penalty stroke or flick or the end of the one on one) or time expires.

The governing body of hockey is the International Hockey Federation (FIH), with men and women being represented internationally in competitions including the Olympic Games, World Cup, World League, Champions Trophy and Junior World Cup, with many countries running extensive junior, senior, and masters club competitions. The FIH is also responsible for organising the Hockey Rules Board and developing the rules for the sport. A popular variant of field hockey is indoor field hockey, which differs in a number of respects while embodying the primary principles of hockey. Indoor hockey is a 5-a-side variant, with a field which is reduced to approximately 40 m × 20 m (131 ft × 66 ft). With many of the rules remaining the same, including obstruction and feet, there are several key variations: Players may not raise the ball unless shooting on goal, players may not hit the ball (instead using pushes to transfer the ball), and the sidelines are replaced with solid barriers which the ball will rebound off.

Rio 2016 - Spain vs Netherlands © flickr.com - Jonas de Carvalho/cc-by-sa-2.0 Eurohockey 2015 - Netherlands vs Spain © flickr.com - fourthandfifteen/cc-by-2.0 Eurohockey 2015 - Netherlands vs Spain © flickr.com - fourthandfifteen/cc-by-2.0 Hockey field metric © Robert Merkel Hockey handle © Martin Conlon/cc-by-sa-4.0
<
>
Eurohockey 2015 - Netherlands vs Spain © flickr.com - fourthandfifteen/cc-by-2.0
Most hockey field dimensions were originally fixed using whole numbers of imperial measures. Nevertheless, metric measurements are now the official dimensions as laid down by the International Hockey Federation (FIH) in the “Rules of Hockey”. The pitch is a 91.4 m × 55 m (100.0 yd × 60.1 yd) rectangular field. At each end is a goal 2.14 m (7 ft) high and 3.66 m (12 ft) wide, as well as lines across the field 22.90 m (25 yd) from each end-line (generally referred to as the 23-metre lines or the 25-yard lines) and in the center of the field. A spot 0.15 m (6 in) in diameter, called the penalty spot or stroke mark, is placed with its centre 6.40 m (7 yd) from the centre of each goal. The shooting circle is 15 m (16 yd) from the base line.

The game is played between two teams of whom eleven are permitted to be on the pitch at any one time. The remaining players may be substituted in any combination. There is an unlimited amount of times a team can sub in and out. Substitutions are permitted at any point in the game, apart from between the award and end of a penalty corner; two exceptions to this rule is for injury or suspension of the defending goalkeeper, which is not allowed when playing with a field keep, or a player can exit the field, but you must wait until after the inserter touches the ball to put somebody back in. Players are permitted to play the ball with the flat of the ‘face side’ and with the edges of the head and handle of the field hockey stick with the exception that, for reasons of safety, the ball may not be struck ‘hard’ with a forehand edge stroke, because of the difficulty of controlling the height and direction of the ball from that stroke. The flat side is always on the “natural” side for a right-handed person swinging the stick at the ball from right to left. Left-handed sticks are rare, but available; however they are pointless as the rules forbid their use in a game. To make a strike at the ball with a left-to-right swing the player must present the flat of the ‘face’ of the stick to the ball by ‘reversing’ the stick head, i.e. by turning the handle through approximately 180° (while a reverse edge hit would turn the stick head through approximately 90° from the position of an upright forehand stroke with the ‘face’ of the stick head).

Edge hitting of the ball underwent a two-year “experimental period”, twice the usual length of an “experimental trial” and is still a matter of some controversy within the sport. Ric Charlesworth, the former Australian coach, has been a strong critic of the unrestricted use of the reverse edge hit. The ‘hard’ forehand edge hit was banned after similar concerns were expressed about the ability of players to direct the ball accurately, but the reverse edge hit does appear to be more predictable and controllable than its counterpart. This type of hit is now more commonly referred to as the “forehand sweep” where the ball is hit with the flat side or “natural” side of the stick and not the rounded edge. Other rules include; no foot-to-ball contact, no use of hands, no obstructing other players, no high back swing, and no third party. If a player is dribbling the ball and either loses control and kicks the ball or another player interferes that player is not permitted to gain control and continue dribbling. The rules do not allow the person who kicked the ball to gain advantage from the kick, so the ball will automatically be passed on to the opposing team. Conversely, if no advantage is gained from kicking the ball, play should continue. Players may not obstruct another’s chance of hitting the ball in any way. No shoving/using your body/stick to prevent advancement in the other team. Penalty for this is the opposing team receives the ball and if the problem continues, the player can be carded. While a player is taking a free hit or starting a corner the back swing of their hit cannot be too high for this is considered dangerous. Finally there may not be three players touching the ball at one time. Two players from opposing teams can battle for the ball, however if another player interferes it is considered third party and the ball automatically goes to the team who only had one player involved in the third party.

Read more on International Hockey Federation and Wikipedia Field hockey (Smart Traveler App by U.S. Department of State - Weather report by weather.com - Global Passport Power Rank - Travel Risk Map - Democracy Index - GDP according to IMF, UN, and World Bank - Global Competitiveness Report - Corruption Perceptions Index - Press Freedom Index - World Justice Project - Rule of Law Index - UN Human Development Index - Global Peace Index - Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Index). Photos by Wikimedia Commons. If you have a suggestion, critique, review or comment to this blog entry, we are looking forward to receive your e-mail at comment@wingsch.net. Please name the headline of the blog post to which your e-mail refers to in the subject line.




Recommended posts:

Share this post: (Please note data protection regulations before using buttons)

St. Kitts Scenic Railway

St. Kitts Scenic Railway

[caption id="attachment_232014" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © flickr.com - David Stanley/cc-by-2.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]St. Kitts Scenic Railway is a 29 kilometres (18 mi) long narrow gauge railway line along the coastline of the island of St. Kitts in the eastern Caribbean, with a track gauge of 762 mm (2 ft 6 in). The original track was laid from 1912 to 1926, to deliver sugar cane from the plantations to the new centralised sugar mill in Basseterre. The sugar mill was built by a group of investors in 1912, to reduc...

[ read more ]

Lower East Side Tenement Museum in New York City

Lower East Side Tenement Museum in New York City

[caption id="attachment_234171" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © flickr.com - ajay_suresh/cc-by-2.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The Lower East Side Tenement Museum, located at 97 and 103 Orchard Street in the Lower East Side neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, is a National Historic Site. The museum's two historical tenement buildings were home to an estimated 15,000 people, from over 20 nations, between 1863 and 2011. The museum, which includes a visitors' center, promotes tolerance and historical perspective on the immi...

[ read more ]

The Lake Lucerne in Switzerland

The Lake Lucerne in Switzerland

[caption id="attachment_153955" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Lake Lucerne from Mount Pilatus © Ttrainer[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Lake Lucerne ("Lake of the Four Forested Cantons") is a lake in central Switzerland and the fourth largest in the country. The lake has a complicated shape, with bends and arms reaching from the city of Lucerne into the mountains. It has a total area of 114 km² (44 sq mi), an elevation of 434 m (1,424 ft), and a maximum depth of 214 m (702 ft). Its volume is 11.8 km³. Much of the shorel...

[ read more ]

Yale University in New Haven

Yale University in New Haven

[caption id="attachment_222737" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Benjamin Franklin College courtyard © Helpfullguy99/cc-by-sa-4.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Yale University is a private Ivy League research university in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701 as the Collegiate School, it is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine Colonial Colleges chartered before the American Revolution. The Collegiate School was renamed Yale College in 1718 to honor the school's largest private...

[ read more ]

Frederik's Church in Copenhagen

Frederik's Church in Copenhagen

[caption id="attachment_218862" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © flickr.com - RAYANDBEE/cc-by-2.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Frederik's Church (Frederiks Kirke), popularly known as The Marble Church (Marmorkirken) for its rococo architecture, is an Evangelical Lutheran church in Copenhagen, Denmark. The church forms the focal point of the Frederiksstaden district; it is located due west of Amalienborg Palace. The church was designed by the architect Nicolai Eigtved in 1740 and was along with the rest of Frederiksstaden, a dist...

[ read more ]

Meaux in the Brie region

Meaux in the Brie region

[caption id="attachment_160979" align="aligncenter" width="590"] River boats in the foreground and St. Stephen's Cathedral in the background © Toine77/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Meaux is a commune in the Seine-et-Marne department in the Île-de-France region in the metropolitan area of Paris. It is located 41.1 km (25.5 mi) east-northeast from the center of Paris. With a population of 51,400 inhabitants, Meaux is the second most populated city in the Seine-et-Marne department after Chelles with 53,000 inhabitants. ...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Turkish Riviera - Antalya

Theme Week Turkish Riviera - Antalya

[caption id="attachment_151015" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © Erencet/cc-by-sa-3.0[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Antalya is a city on the Mediterranean coast of southwestern Turkey. It is Turkey's biggest international sea resort, located on the Turkish Riviera. In 2011 the city had a population of 964,886 and the metropolitan municipality 1,041,972. The Turkish Riviera is also the home for the internationally known Blue Voyage, which allows participants to enjoy a week-long trip on the locally built gulet type schooners to an...

[ read more ]

Laas in the Vinschgau Valley

Laas in the Vinschgau Valley

[caption id="attachment_160959" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Wooden aqueduct © Hegedex[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Laas (Italian: Lasa) is a municipality in the province of South Tyrol in northern Italy, located about 50 km west of the city of Bolzano. It has a population of 4,000 and an area of 110.1 km². The municipality of Laas (Lasa) contains the frazioni (subdivisions, mainly villages and hamlets) Allitz (Alliz), Eyrs (Oris), Tanas, and Tschengls (Cengles). Laas is known for the pure white marble quarried in the...

[ read more ]

Theme Week Moscow, the third Rome

Theme Week Moscow, the third Rome

[caption id="attachment_154160" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Bolshoy Kamenny Bridge, Kremlin in the background © Ikar.us[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Moscow is the capital, the most populous city, and the most populous federal subject of Russia. The city is a major political, economic, cultural, scientific, religious, financial, educational, and transportation centre of Russia and the world. A global city, Moscow is the most populous city on the continent of Europe and the seventh largest city proper in the world. Its populati...

[ read more ]

Isles of Scilly

Isles of Scilly

[caption id="attachment_172043" align="aligncenter" width="590"] St. Agnes Lighthouse © Andrewrabbott[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The Isles of Scilly are an archipelago off the southwestern tip of Cornwall. One of the islands, St Agnes, is the most southerly point in both England and the United Kingdom, being over 4 miles (6.4 km) further south than the most southerly point of the British mainland at Lizard Point. The population of all the islands is at around 2,300. Scilly forms part of the ceremonial county of Cornwall, and som...

[ read more ]

Return to TopReturn to Top
© flickr.com - Galeria del Ministerio de Defensa del Perú/cc-by-2.0
The sail training ship Unión

The BAP Unión is a training ship of the Peruvian Navy. It is a four-masted steel hulled full rigged barque...

Cheyenne Mountain © flickr.com - Jimmy/cc-by-sa-2.0
Cheyenne Mountain

Cheyenne Mountain is a triple-peaked mountain in El Paso County, Colorado, southwest of downtown Colorado Springs. The mountain serves as...

© flickr.com - Hussein Abdallah/cc-by-2.0
Theme Week Beirut – The Phoenicia

The Phoenicia Hotel Beirut is a historic 5-star luxury hotel situated in the Minet El Hosn neighborhood of Beirut in...

Close