Golders Green in London

Monday, 5 July 2021 - 11:00 am (CET/MEZ) Berlin | Author/Destination:
Category/Kategorie: General, London
Reading Time:  4 minutes

Golders Hill Park © geograph.org.uk - Martin Addison/cc-by-sa-2.0

Golders Hill Park © geograph.org.uk – Martin Addison/cc-by-sa-2.0

Golders Green is an area in the London Borough of Barnet in England. A smaller suburban linear settlement, near a farm and public grazing area green of medieval origins, dates to the early 19th century. Its bulk forms a late 19th-century and early 20th-century suburb with a commercial crossroads. The rest is of later build. It is centred approximately 6 miles (9 km) north west of Charing Cross on the intersection of Golders Green Road and Finchley Road.

It was founded as a medieval hamlet in the large parish of Hendon, Middlesex. The parish was heavily superseded by Hendon Urban District in 1894 and by the Municipal Borough of Hendon in 1932, abolished in 1965. In the early 20th century it grew rapidly in response to the opening of a tube station of the London Underground, adjacent to the Golders Green Hippodrome which was home to the BBC Concert Orchestra for many years. The area has a wide variety of housing and a busy main shopping street, Golders Green Road. It is known for its large Jewish population as well as for being home to the largest Jewish kosher hub (located west of Hoop Lane after the rail bridge) in the United Kingdom, which attracts many Jewish tourists.

Shops on Golders Green Road © Mark Ahsmann/cc-by-sa-3.0 Shops on Golders Green Road © geograph.org.uk - Glyn Baker/cc-by-sa-2.0 Clock Tower © geograph.org.uk - Oxyman/cc-by-sa-2.0 Hippodrome © geograph.org.uk - ceridwen/cc-by-sa-2.0 Shops on Golders Green Road © geograph.org.uk - Martin Addison/cc-by-sa-2.0 Golders Hill Park © geograph.org.uk - Martin Addison/cc-by-sa-2.0
<
>
Shops on Golders Green Road © geograph.org.uk - Martin Addison/cc-by-sa-2.0
There has been a prominent Jewish community in Golders Green since the early 20th century. The Jewish community took root after Hitler‘s rise to power, with the first German Jewish immigrants forming the Golders Green Beth Hamedrash. Soon after, Galician Jewish immigrants formed other synagogues. With it came the formation of Jewish schools such as Menorah before the onset of World War II. There are close to fifty Kosher restaurants and eateries under rabbinical supervision in Golders Green, and more than 40 synagogues throughout the area continuing into neighbouring Hendon, as well as 30 schools (some in outlying areas owing to space restriction), many of them independent. The Jewish community of Hendon and Golders Green is viewed as one, sharing the schooling system as well as rabbinical guidance.

Golders Green is home to a growing Japanese and East Asian community with many families living in the district being catered for a notable number of restaurants and shops specialising in Japanese and other East Asian food, such as the Seoul Plaza supermarket.

The area has restaurants with cuisines from all over the world including Indian, Israeli, Thai, Turkish, Japanese, Chinese, Korean and Italian eateries. There are over a dozen coffee bars and a number of niche food stores.

Read more on hidden-london.com – Golders Green, EssentialLiving.co.uk – Living in Golders Green: A Traditional London Neighbourhood, Kosher Kingdom and Wikipedia Golders Green (Smart Traveler App by U.S. Department of State - Weather report by weather.com - Global Passport Power Rank - Travel Risk Map - Democracy Index - GDP according to IMF, UN, and World Bank - Global Competitiveness Report - Corruption Perceptions Index - Press Freedom Index - World Justice Project - Rule of Law Index - UN Human Development Index - Global Peace Index - Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Index). Photos by Wikimedia Commons. If you have a suggestion, critique, review or comment to this blog entry, we are looking forward to receive your e-mail at comment@wingsch.net. Please name the headline of the blog post to which your e-mail refers to in the subject line.




Recommended posts:

Share this post: (Please note data protection regulations before using buttons)

Theme Week Tunisia - Kasserine

Theme Week Tunisia - Kasserine

[caption id="attachment_168283" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © looklex.com[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Kasserine is the capital city of the Kasserine Governorate, in west-central Tunisia. It is situated below Jebel ech Chambi, Tunisia's highest mountain. Its population is 110,000. By road it is 200 kilometres west of Sfax, 246 kilometres (180 mi) south-west of Tunis, 166 kilometres (141 mi) south-west of Sousse. In classical antiquity it was a Roman colony, known as Cillium. Under Roman Emperor Vespasian (69-79) or Ti...

[ read more ]

České Budějovice in Southern Bohemia

České Budějovice in Southern Bohemia

[caption id="attachment_153823" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Market Square © Erwin1990[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]České Budějovice (German and English: Budweis) is a city in the Czech Republic. It is the largest city in the South Bohemian Region and is the political and commercial capital of the region and centre of the Roman Catholic Diocese of České Budějovice and of the University of South Bohemia and the Academy of Sciences. The town is not to be confused with Moravské Budějovice in Moravia. Budějovice h...

[ read more ]

The TRANSROMANICA as Major Cultural Route of the Council of Europe

The TRANSROMANICA as Major Cultural Route of the Council of Europe

[caption id="attachment_161236" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © transromanica.com[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]TRANSROMANICA was officially recognized as a "Major European Cultural Route" by the Council of Europe in August 2007. The Cultural Routes programme was launched by the Council of Europe in 1987. Its objective was to demonstrate in a visible way, by means of a journey through space and time, how the heritage of the different countries and cultures of Europe represented a shared cultural heritage. TRANSROMANIC...

[ read more ]

Portrait: The Reformer Martin Luther

Portrait: The Reformer Martin Luther

[caption id="attachment_169010" align="aligncenter" width="586"] Martin Luther (1529) by Lucas Cranach the Elder[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Martin Luther (10 November 1483 – 18 February 1546), O.S.A., was a German professor of theology, composer, priest, monk and a seminal figure in the Protestant Reformation. Luther came to reject several teachings and practices of the Roman Catholic Church. He strongly disputed the Catholic view on indulgences as he understood it to be, that freedom from God's punishment for sin could be purc...

[ read more ]

Sibiu in Transylvania

Sibiu in Transylvania

[caption id="attachment_160727" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Sibiu © JF.Aubert[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Sibiu is a city in Transylvania, Romania, with a population of 155,000. Located some 282 km north-west of Bucharest, the city straddles the Cibin River, a tributary of the River Olt. Nowadays the capital of Sibiu County, between 1692 and 1791 Sibiu was the capital of the Principality of Transylvania. Sibiu is one of the most important cultural centres of Romania and, in tandem with Luxembourg, it was designated a...

[ read more ]

The island of Crete

The island of Crete

[caption id="attachment_150176" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Pavlos © Kramer96[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Crete is the largest and most populous of the Greek islands and the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. Heraklion is the largest city and capital of Crete. It forms a significant part of the economy and cultural heritage of Greece; while it retains its own local cultural traits (such as its own dialect, poetry, and music). Crete was the center of the Minoan civilization (circa 2700–1420 BC), the first civili...

[ read more ]

The East Indiamen

The East Indiamen

[caption id="attachment_221486" align="aligncenter" width="590"] Batavia replica © Ökologix[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]East Indiaman was a general name for any sailing ship operating under charter or licence to any of the East India trading companies of the major European trading powers of the 17th through the 19th centuries. The term is used to refer to vessels belonging to the Austrian, Danish, Dutch, English, French, Portuguese, or Swedish companies. Some of the East Indiamen chartered by the British East India Company were ...

[ read more ]

The Nobel Peace Prize for 2012

The Nobel Peace Prize for 2012

[caption id="attachment_6597" align="alignleft" width="266"] Photo: Thomas Widerberg © The Nobel Foundation 2007. Nobel Prize® and the Nobel Prize® media design mark are the registered trademarks of the Nobel Foundation.©[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace Prize for 2012 is to be awarded to the European Union (EU). The union and its forerunners have for over six decades contributed to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights in Europe. ...

[ read more ]

A-Rosa on the Rhône/Saône: Travel with all senses.

A-Rosa on the Rhône/Saône: Travel with all senses.

[caption id="attachment_153815" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © A-Rosa Luna[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Treat yourself to French savoir vivre – on trips through Provence and Camargue to the Mediterranean coast. In Europe’s most beautiful countryside, you will not be able to get enough of the picturesque scenery: world-famous wine-growing regions such as the Côte d’Or, unique landscapes such as Burgundy, or the coastal vistas of the Côte d’Azure. But you won’t just love the views: our culinary treats on board comple...

[ read more ]

Eberbach Abbey in the Rheingau

Eberbach Abbey in the Rheingau

[caption id="attachment_161276" align="aligncenter" width="590"] © Fritz Geller-Grimm[/caption][responsivevoice_button voice="UK English Female" buttontext="Listen to this Post"]Eberbach Abbey (German: Kloster Eberbach) is a former Cistercian monastery near Eltville am Rhein in the Rheingau. On account of its impressive Romanesque and early Gothic buildings it is considered one of the most significant architectural heritage sites in Hesse. In the winter of 1985/86 the interior scenes of the film The Name of the Rose were filmed here. The vineyards of Eberbach Abbey were, at 300 hectar...

[ read more ]

Return to TopReturn to Top
Fourth of July at the U.S. Capitol © flickr.com - Architect of the Capitol
Fourth of July, Independence Day in the United States

Independence Day (colloquially the Fourth of July or July 4) is a federal holiday in the United States commemorating the...

22-story ALICO building © flickr.com - Austrini/cc-by-sa-2.0
Waco in Texas

Waco is the county seat of McLennan County, Texas, United States. It is situated along the Brazos River and I-35,...

at Kieler Woche 2007 © VollwertBIT/cc-by-sa-2.5
The brig Roald Amundsen

Roald Amundsen (often abbreviated Roald; named in honor of Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen), originally named Vilm, is a German...

Close