Avery Island in Louisiana

Monday, 10 October 2022 - 11:00 am (CET/MEZ) Berlin | Author/Destination:
Category/Kategorie: General
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McIlhenny Co. Factory, makers of Tabasco sauce © Shane K. Bernard/cc-by-sa-3.0

McIlhenny Co. Factory, makers of Tabasco sauce © Shane K. Bernard/cc-by-sa-3.0

Avery Island (historically French: Île Petite Anse) is a salt dome best known as the source of Tabasco sauce. Located in Iberia Parish, Louisiana, United States, it is approximately three miles (4.8 km) inland from Vermilion Bay, which in turn opens onto the Gulf of Mexico. A small human population lives on the island. The island is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The island was named after the Avery family, who settled there in the 1860s, but long before that, Native Americans had found that Avery Island’s verdant flora covered a precious natural resource—a massive salt dome. There, Native Americans boiled the Island’s briny spring water to extract salt, which they traded to other tribes as far away as central Texas, Arkansas, and Ohio.

According to records maintained prior to 1999 in the Southern Historical Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Petite Anse Island, renamed Avery Island in the late 19th century, was purchased by John Craig Marsh of New Jersey in 1818. Marsh operated a sugar plantation on the island’s fertile soil. His daughter, Sarah Craig Marsh, married Daniel Dudley Avery in 1837, thus uniting the Marsh and Avery families. Daniel Dudley Avery hailed from Baton Rouge, and was a jurist. In 1849, Daniel became co-owner of his in-law’s sugar plantation, and in 1855 he became sole owner. Before the Civil War, Edmund McIlhenny joined the Avery family, by marrying Mary Eliza Avery, daughter of Daniel Dudley Avery and Sarah Marsh Avery. In 1868, McIlhenny founded McIlhenny Company, and began manufacturing Tabasco brand pepper sauce. In 1870, he received letters patent for his sauce processing formula. That same basic process is still used today. In 1938, E.A. McIlhenny established a nutria farm on Avery Island, Louisiana, near the factory where the company that bears his family name makes Tabasco sauce. According to company history, McIlhenny bought his stock of nutrias from a farm near New Orleans, so he was not the first to introduce the creature, a native of southern Brazil, Argentina, and Chile, to North America. What is certain, though, is that McIlhenny, for reasons unknown, released an unknown but probably large number of nutrias into the wild from the confines of Avery Island, and from there they fanned out and proliferated. Avery Island was hit hard in September 2005 by Hurricane Rita. According to The New York Times, the family spent $5 million on constructing a 17-foot (5.2 m)-high levee, pumps, and back-up generators to ensure that future hurricanes will not disrupt Tabasco sauce production.

Tabasco varieties © DJM/cc-by-sa-3.0 © Serge Ottaviani/cc-by-sa-3.0 © Serge Ottaviani/cc-by-sa-3.0 © Serge Ottaviani/cc-by-sa-3.0 © Serge Ottaviani/cc-by-sa-3.0 © Serge Ottaviani/cc-by-sa-3.0 © Serge Ottaviani/cc-by-sa-3.0 © Serge Ottaviani/cc-by-sa-3.0 McIlhenny Co. Factory, makers of Tabasco sauce © Shane K. Bernard/cc-by-sa-3.0
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McIlhenny Co. Factory, makers of Tabasco sauce © Shane K. Bernard/cc-by-sa-3.0
Under the Avery/McIlhenny family’s management, Avery Island has remained a natural paradise, inhabited by many animal species, as well as by exotic plants from throughout the world. Edward Avery McIlhenny, or “Mr. Ned” as he was affectionately known, founded this bird colony—later called Bird City—around 1895 after plume hunters had slaughtered egrets by the thousands to provide feathers for ladies’ hats. Edward gathered eight young egrets, raised them in captivity on the island, and released them in the fall to migrate across the Gulf of Mexico. The following spring the birds returned to the island with others of their species, a migration that continues today.

Edward McIlhenny introduced numerous varieties of azaleas, Japanese camellias, Egyptian papyrus sedge, and other rare plants to the Island’s natural landscape. When oil was discovered on the Island in 1942, he ensured that production crews bypassed live oak trees and buried pipelines (or painted them green) to preserve the Island’s beauty, wildlife, and utility as a wildlife refuge. Today Jungle Gardens and Bird City are open to the public.

Avery Island is surrounded on all sides by bayous (slow-moving, muddy rivers), salt marsh, and swampland; it sits about 130 miles (210 km) west of New Orleans. The island was a sugar plantation formerly known as Petite Anse Island. (Petite Anse means “Little Cove” in Cajun French.) Access to the island is via a toll road (technically a very low toll bridge), though a toll is no longer charged for visitors, including tourists. At its highest point, the island is 163 feet (50 m) above mean sea level. It covers about 2,200 acres (8.9 km²) and is about 2.5 miles (4.0 km) across at its widest point.

Avery Island is actually a huge dome of rock salt, three miles (4.8 km) long and two and a half miles (4.0 km) wide. It was created by the upwelling of ancient evaporite (salt) deposits that exist beneath the Mississippi River Delta region. These upwellings are known as “salt domes”. Avery Island is one of five salt dome islands that rise above the flat Louisiana Gulf coast. The Five Islands from northwest to southeast are Jefferson Island, Avery Island, Weeks Island, Cote Blanche Island and Belle Isle.

Read more on IberiaTravel.com – Avery Island, LouisianaTravel.com – Avery Island, Tabasco.com – Avery Island and Wikipedia Avery Island (Smart Traveler App by U.S. Department of State - Weather report by weather.com - Global Passport Power Rank - Travel Risk Map - Democracy Index - GDP according to IMF, UN, and World Bank - Global Competitiveness Report - Corruption Perceptions Index - Press Freedom Index - World Justice Project - Rule of Law Index - UN Human Development Index - Global Peace Index - Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Index). Photos by Wikimedia Commons. If you have a suggestion, critique, review or comment to this blog entry, we are looking forward to receive your e-mail at comment@wingsch.net. Please name the headline of the blog post to which your e-mail refers to in the subject line.






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