Beef Wellington

26 May 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Bon appétit Reading Time:  4 minutes

© flickr.com - Parkerman & Christie/cc-by-2.0

© flickr.com – Parkerman & Christie/cc-by-2.0

Beef Wellington is a steak dish of English origin, made out of fillet steak coated with pâté (often pâté de foie gras) and duxelles, wrapped in puff pastry, then baked. Some recipes include wrapping the coated meat in a crêpe or dry-cured ham to retain the moisture and prevent it from making the pastry soggy.   read more…

Windermere in the Lake District

21 May 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks Reading Time:  10 minutes

Looking over Windermere to the Langdale Pikes from Millerground © Ericoides/cc-by-sa-4.0

Looking over Windermere to the Langdale Pikes from Millerground © Ericoides/cc-by-sa-4.0

Windermere (sometimes tautologically called Lake Windermere to distinguish it from the nearby town of Windermere) is a ribbon lake in Cumbria, England, and part of the Lake District. It is the largest lake in England by length, area, and volume, but considerably smaller than the largest Scottish lochs and Northern Irish loughs.   read more…

Fish and Chips

12 May 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Bon appétit Reading Time:  11 minutes

© LoopZilla/cc-by-sa-3.0

© LoopZilla/cc-by-sa-3.0

Fish and chips is a hot dish consisting of fried fish in batter, served with chips. The dish originated in England, where these two components had been introduced from separate immigrant cultures; it is not known who combined them. Often considered Britain’s national dish, fish and chips is a common takeaway food in numerous other countries, particularly English-speaking and Commonwealth nations.   read more…

London Charterhouse

6 May 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London Reading Time:  8 minutes

© KJP1/cc-by-sa-4.0

© KJP1/cc-by-sa-4.0

The London Charterhouse is a historic complex of buildings in Farringdon, London, dating back to the 14th century. It occupies land to the north of Charterhouse Square, and lies within the London Borough of Islington. It was originally built (and takes its name from) a Carthusian priory, founded in 1371 on the site of a Black Death burial ground. Following the priory’s dissolution in 1537, it was rebuilt from 1545 onwards to become one of the great courtyard houses of Tudor London. In 1611, the property was bought by Thomas Sutton, a businessman and “the wealthiest commoner in England”, who established a school for the young and an almshouse for the old. The almshouse remains in occupation today, while the school was re-located in 1872 to Godalming, Surrey.   read more…

Sunday roast

7 April 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Bon appétit Reading Time:  7 minutes

Sunday roast © flickr.com - Roderick Eime/cc-by-2.0

Sunday roast © flickr.com – Roderick Eime/cc-by-2.0

A Sunday roast or roast dinner is a traditional meal of British origin. Although it can be consumed throughout the week, it is traditionally consumed on Sunday. It consists of roasted meat, roasted potatoes, mashed potatoes and accompaniments such as Yorkshire pudding, stuffing, gravy, and condiments such as apple sauce, mint sauce, or redcurrant sauce. A wide range of vegetables can be served as part of a roast dinner, such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, parsnips, or peas, which can be boiled, steamed, or roasted alongside the meat and potatoes.   read more…

Tamworth in Staffordshire

28 March 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  5 minutes

Town Hall © panoramio.com - Tanya Dedyukhina/cc-by-3.0

Town Hall © panoramio.com – Tanya Dedyukhina/cc-by-3.0

Tamworth is a market town and borough in Staffordshire, England, 14 miles (23 km) north-east of Birmingham. The town borders North Warwickshire to the east and north, Lichfield to the north, south-west and west. The town takes its name from the River Tame, which flows through it. The population of Tamworth borough (2021) was 78,838. The wider urban area had a population of 81,964.   read more…

Lulworth Cove on the Jurassic Coast

20 March 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, UNESCO World Heritage Reading Time:  5 minutes

Lulworth Cove © Nilfanion/cc-by-sa-4.0

Lulworth Cove © Nilfanion/cc-by-sa-4.0

Lulworth Cove is a cove near the village of West Lulworth, on the Jurassic Coast in Dorset, southern England. The cove is one of the world’s finest examples of such a landform, and is a World Heritage Site and tourist location with approximately 500,000 visitors every year, of whom about 30 per cent visit in July and August. It is close to the rock arch of Durdle Door and other Jurassic Coast sites.   read more…

Haggis

17 March 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Bon appétit Reading Time:  7 minutes

displayed for sale © flickr.com - Chris Brown/cc-by-2.0

displayed for sale © flickr.com – Chris Brown/cc-by-2.0

Haggis (Scottish Gaelic: taigeis) is a savoury pudding containing sheep’s pluck (heart, liver, and lungs), minced with onion, oatmeal, suet, spices, and salt, mixed with stock, and cooked while traditionally encased in the animal’s stomach though now an artificial casing is often used instead. According to the 2001 English edition of the Larousse Gastronomique: “Although its description is not immediately appealing, haggis has an excellent nutty texture and delicious savoury flavour”.   read more…

Hebden Bridge in West Yorkshire

9 March 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  7 minutes

© Ambrose113/cc-by-sa-4.0

© Ambrose113/cc-by-sa-4.0

Hebden Bridge is a market town in the Calderdale district of West Yorkshire, England. It is in the Upper Calder Valley, 8 miles (13 km) west of Halifax and 14 miles (21 km) north-east of Rochdale, at the confluence of the River Calder and the Hebden Water. The town is the largest settlement in the civil parish of Hebden Royd.   read more…

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