Theme Week Firth of Clyde – Island Davaar

25 July 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  6 minutes

Island Davaar Lighthouse © geograph.org.uk - Calum McRoberts/cc-by-sa-2.0

Island Davaar Lighthouse © geograph.org.uk – Calum McRoberts/cc-by-sa-2.0

Island Davaar or Davaar Island (Scottish Gaelic: Eilean Dà Bhàrr) is located at the mouth of Campbeltown Loch off the east coast of Kintyre Peninsula, in Argyll and Bute, west of Scotland. It is a tidal island, linked to the mainland by a natural shingle causeway called the Doìrlinn near Campbeltown at low tide. The crossing can be made in around 40 minutes.   read more…

Prophet’s Mosque in Medina

25 July 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  8 minutes

© Wurzelgnohm

© Wurzelgnohm

The Prophet’s Mosque is the second mosque built by the Islamic prophet Muhammad in Medina, after that of Quba, as well as the second largest mosque and holiest site in Islam, after the Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, in the Saudi region of the Hejaz. The mosque is located at the heart of Medina, and is a major site of pilgrimage that falls under the purview of the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques.   read more…

Theme Week Firth of Clyde – Ailsa Craig

24 July 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  5 minutes

Ailsa Craig Lighthouse © geograph.org.uk - David Baird/cc-by-sa-2.0

Ailsa Craig Lighthouse © geograph.org.uk – David Baird/cc-by-sa-2.0

Ailsa Craig (Scots: Ailsae Craig; Scottish Gaelic: Creag Ealasaid) is an island of 99 ha (240 acres) in the outer Firth of Clyde, 16 km (8.5 mi) west of mainland Scotland, upon which microgranite has long been quarried to make curling stones. The now-uninhabited island comprises the remains of a magmatic pluton formed during the same period of igneous activity as magmatic rocks on the nearby Isle of Arran.   read more…

Portrait: Robert Oppenheimer, an American theoretical physicist

24 July 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Portrait Reading Time:  6 minutes

in 1946 © Ed Westcott - U.S. Government photographer

in 1946 © Ed Westcott – U.S. Government photographer

J. Robert Oppenheimer was an American theoretical physicist who served as the director of the Manhattan Project‘s Los Alamos Laboratory during World War II. He is often called the “father of the atomic bomb” for his role in overseeing the development of the first nuclear weapons.   read more…

Theme Week Firth of Clyde – Little Cumbrae

23 July 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  7 minutes

Lighthouse © flickr.com - David Cook/cc-by-2.0

Lighthouse © flickr.com – David Cook/cc-by-2.0

Little Cumbrae (Scottish Gaelic: Cumaradh Beag) is an island in the Firth of Clyde, in North Ayrshire, Scotland. It lies south of Great Cumbrae, its larger neighbour. The underlying geology is igneous with limited outcrops of sedimentary rock. Little Cumbrae House is of 20th century construction, although the island has no permanent inhabitation at present, its population having peaked at 23 in the late 19th century. There is a lighthouse on the western coast.   read more…

Pont-l’Évêque in Calvados

23 July 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Bon appétit Reading Time:  3 minutes

© René Hourdry/cc-by-sa-4.0

© René Hourdry/cc-by-sa-4.0

Pont-l’Évêque is a commune in the Calvados department in the Normandy region in northwestern France. It is known for Pont-l’Évêque cheese, a type of soft cheese, the oldest Normandy cheese in production.   read more…

Theme Week Firth of Clyde

22 July 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Bon voyage, Theme Weeks Reading Time:  10 minutes

Holy Isle from Lamlash © Colin/cc-by-sa-3.0

Holy Isle from Lamlash © Colin/cc-by-sa-3.0

The Firth of Clyde is the estuary of the River Clyde, on the west coast of Scotland. The Firth has some of the deepest coastal waters of the British Isles. The Firth is sheltered from the Atlantic Ocean by the Kintyre Peninsula. The Firth lies between West Dunbartonshire in the north, Argyll and Bute in the west and Inverclyde, North Ayrshire and South Ayrshire in the east. The Kilbrannan Sound is a large arm of the Firth, separating the Kintyre Peninsula from the Isle of Arran. The Kyles of Bute separates the Isle of Bute from the Cowal Peninsula. The Sound of Bute separates the islands of Bute and Arran.   read more…

New Lanark in Scotland

22 July 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, UNESCO World Heritage Reading Time:  7 minutes

© Alex Liivet

© Alex Liivet

New Lanark is a village on the River Clyde, approximately 1.4 miles (2.3 kilometres) from Lanark, in Lanarkshire, and some 25 miles (40 km) southeast of Glasgow, Scotland. It was founded in 1785 and opened in 1786 by David Dale, who built cotton mills and housing for the mill workers. Dale built the mills there in a brief partnership with the English inventor and entrepreneur Richard Arkwright to take advantage of the water power provided by the only waterfalls on the River Clyde. Under the ownership of a partnership that included Dale’s son-in-law, Robert Owen, a Welsh utopian socialist and philanthropist, New Lanark became a successful business and an early example of a planned settlement and so an important milestone in the historical development of urban planning.   read more…

Lobster Roll

21 July 2024 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Bon appétit Reading Time:  6 minutes

© flickr.com - Dana Moos/cc-by-2.0

© flickr.com – Dana Moos/cc-by-2.0

A lobster roll is a dish native to New England and Atlantic Canada. It is made of lobster meat served on a grilled hot dog–style bun. The filling may also contain butter, lemon juice, salt, and black pepper, with variants made in some parts of New England replacing the butter with mayonnaise. Other versions may contain diced celery or scallion. Potato chips or French fries are the typical side dishes.   read more…

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