Hamilton on the Islands of Bermuda

23 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  6 minutes

Front Street © JoeyBagODonuts/cc-by-sa-3.0

Front Street © JoeyBagODonuts/cc-by-sa-3.0

The City of Hamilton, in Pembroke Parish, is the territorial capital of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda. It is the territory’s financial centre and a major port and tourist destination. Its population of 854 (2016) is one of the smallest of any capital cities. According to Numbeo, Hamilton, Bermuda holds the record for the highest cost of living index in the world with the cost of living rate in Hamilton being at 147.42 as of 2021.   read more…

Capitoline Hill in Rome

21 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks Reading Time:  22 minutes

Piazza del Campidoglio, on the top of Capitoline Hill, with the Palazzo Senatorio © Alvesgaspar/cc-by-sa-4.0

Piazza del Campidoglio, on the top of Capitoline Hill, with the Palazzo Senatorio © Alvesgaspar/cc-by-sa-4.0

The Capitolium or Capitoline Hill (Italian: Campidoglio), between the Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the Seven Hills of Rome. The hill was earlier known as Mons Saturnius, dedicated to the god Saturn. The word Capitolium first meant the temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus later built here, and afterwards it was used for the whole hill (and even other temples of Jupiter on other hills), thus Mons Capitolinus (the adjective noun of Capitolium). In an etymological myth, ancient sources connect the name to caput (“head”, “summit”) and the tale was that, when laying the foundations for the temple, the head of a man was found, some sources even saying it was the head of some Tolus or Olus. The Capitolium was regarded by the Romans as indestructible, and was adopted as a symbol of eternity.   read more…

The Millennium Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles

19 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Greater Los Angeles Area, Hotels Reading Time:  8 minutes

© flickr.com - Chris Eason/cc-by-2-0

© flickr.com – Chris Eason/cc-by-2-0

The Millennium Biltmore Hotel, originally the Los Angeles Biltmore of the Bowman-Biltmore Hotels group, is a luxury hotel located opposite Pershing Square in Downtown Los Angeles, California. Upon its grand opening in 1923, the Los Angeles Biltmore was the largest hotel west of Chicago in the United States. In 1969 the Biltmore Hotel was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles. In 1951, the Los Angeles Biltmore Hotel Company sold to Corrigan Properties for more than $12 million. Regal Hotels purchased the Biltmore in 1996, and then sold it in 1999 to Millennium & Copthorne Hotels. As of 2009, the Los Angeles Biltmore is operated as part of the Millennium & Copthorne Hotels chain as the Millennium Biltmore Hotel. The hotel has 70,000 square feet (6,500 m²) of meeting and banquet space. From its original 1500 guestrooms it now has 683, due to room reorganization. Since 2015, four restaurants and bars serve the hotel, including Smeraldi’s Restaurant (American continental cuisine), newly relaunched Bugis Street Brasserie, the Rendezvous Court, and the Gallery Bar.   read more…

Moulin Rouge in Paris

16 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Paris / Île-de-France Reading Time:  7 minutes

© flickr.com - Christine Zenino/cc-by-2.0

© flickr.com – Christine Zenino/cc-by-2.0

Moulin Rouge (French: lit. “Red Mill”) is a cabaret in Paris, France. The original house, which burned down in 1915, was co-founded in 1889 by Charles Zidler and Joseph Oller, who also owned the Paris Olympia. Close to Montmartre in the Paris district of Pigalle on Boulevard de Clichy in the 18th arrondissement, it is marked by the red windmill on its roof. The closest métro station is Blanche.   read more…

Democracy Way in Germany

14 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  11 minutes

Frankfurter Nationalversammlung im Juni 1848 von Ludwig von Elliott

Frankfurter Nationalversammlung im Juni 1848 von Ludwig von Elliott

The Democracy Way has been a reminder of the political awakening towards democracy in the region in 1848 (German Revolution) since 7 September 2007 as a holiday and at the same time as a cultural route in southwest Germany, modeled on other tourist routes such as the Castle Road or Upper Swabian Baroque Route. It is approx. 280 km long between Freiburg im Breisgau (South Baden) and Frankfurt am Main (Hesse). The subject of “democracy in Germany” is discussed in school lessons, but very few can look back on relatives in their own families who were involved in the efforts at that time. When visiting the places along the Democracy Way, identification opportunities are offered that show that democracy is made by people and does not fall from the sky. There are many monuments on it that remind of individual participants. However, some are more or less anonymous communal graves of the “insurgents” who were shot at the time. The word “Prussia”, on the other hand, still smacks of the intervention troops (federal troops) of that time in Baden. So far there are a total of 63 stations on this history route. Through a better museum didactic, connections should be made comprehensible. The aim is to show what democracy meant in 19th century Germany.   read more…

Rapid City in South Dakota

12 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General Reading Time:  8 minutes

Firehouse Brewing Company © flickr.com - Nick Amoscato/cc-by-2.0

Firehouse Brewing Company © flickr.com – Nick Amoscato/cc-by-2.0

Rapid City (Lakota: “Swift Water City”) is the second most populous city in South Dakota and the county seat of Pennington County. Named after Rapid Creek, where the settlement developed, it is in western South Dakota, on the Black Hills‘ eastern slope. As of 2019, the population was estimated at 77,500.   read more…

Antakya in Turkey

9 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Union for the Mediterranean Reading Time:  9 minutes

© flickr.com - maarten sepp2011/cc-by-sa-2.0

© flickr.com – maarten sepp2011/cc-by-sa-2.0

Antakya, historically known as Antioch, is the capital of Hatay Province, the southernmost province of Turkey. The city is located in a well-watered and fertile valley on the Orontes River, about 20 kilometers (12 mi) from the Levantine Sea. The cuisine of Antakya is renowned. Its cuisine is considered levantine rather than Turkish. The cuisine offers plenty of meals, where beef and lambs are mainly used. Popular dishes include the typical Turkish kebab, served with spices and onions in flat unleavened bread, with yoghurt as ali nazik kebab, oruk, kaytaz böreği and katıklı ekmek . Hot spicy food is a feature of this part of Turkey, along with Turkish coffee and local specialities.   read more…

Yarkon Park in Tel Aviv

7 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks, Union for the Mediterranean Reading Time:  4 minutes

Hadar Yossef National Sports Center © Little Savage/cc-by-sa-4.0

Hadar Yossef National Sports Center © Little Savage/cc-by-sa-4.0

Yarkon Park is a large park in Tel Aviv, Israel, with about sixteen million visits annually. Named after the Yarkon River which flows through it, the park includes extensive lawns, sports facilities, botanical gardens, an aviary, a water park, two outdoor concert venues and lakes.   read more…

Golders Green in London

5 July 2021 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London Reading Time:  7 minutes

Golders Hill Park © geograph.org.uk - Martin Addison/cc-by-sa-2.0

Golders Hill Park © geograph.org.uk – Martin Addison/cc-by-sa-2.0

Golders Green is an area in the London Borough of Barnet in England. A smaller suburban linear settlement, near a farm and public grazing area green of medieval origins, dates to the early 19th century. Its bulk forms a late 19th-century and early 20th-century suburb with a commercial crossroads. The rest is of later build. It is centred approximately 6 miles (9 km) north west of Charing Cross on the intersection of Golders Green Road and Finchley Road.   read more…

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