The European Union: 2019 European Parliament election

Monday, 27 May 2019 - 08:00 am (CET/MEZ) Berlin | Author/Destination:
Category/Kategorie: Editorial, European Union, General

(Latest update: 15 October 2019) From May 23 to 26, 2019, the European elections took place. By far the biggest surprise is that, despite Brexit, the United Kingdom took part in the elections because the country voted to leave the EU by a very small majority, but ultimately was not able to find the exit in time. The motto “Brexit means Brexit” is obviously not as easy to implement as the Brexiteers falsely propagated before the referendum, because the political camps define the exit very differently, making the inner-British process of exit preparations look grotesque, comedic, outrageous, outlandish to ludicrous and leaves the country deeply divided. Although it has been reported more frequently that participation in the United Kingdom’s European elections could be seen as a second Brexit referendum, it is more likely that the British outside Greater London used the election as a “rage vote” to slap the Tories and Labour for various reasons, while the biggest liar on the part of Brexiteers, Nigel Farage (besides Boris Johnson, Jacob Rees-Mogg and others), emerged as the winner of the election. A result that is just as unbelievable as the entire Brexit preparations on the part of the British.

The other results were, with a few exceptions (e.g. Frans Timmermans of the Social Democrats from the Netherlands), much less surprising, especially since the polls were mostly correct, in particular in the not impressiv results of the right-wing nationalist parties. They were able to gain some growth, but remain neither “people’s parties”, nor any other relevant, unlike they wanted to make believe themselves for weeks. They will continue to disturb with nationalist, undemocratic, anti-foreign, anti-EU and anti-constitutional nonsense while at the same time showing how vociferous and unsubstantial incapacitation looks like.

Old and new seats in the European Parliament
The seats in the European Parliament based on the results of the European elections 2014 are as follows:



With 51%, voter turnout has risen across the EU compared to the 2014 elections and is at a 20 year high, even if it is still far from “record-breaking”. In Germany, voter turnout rose by almost 11% to now 61.5%. Higher turnout rates exist only in Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Greece and Luxembourg, where there is a legal requirement to vote and in Malta with 73%. The seats in the European Parliament based on the results of the European elections 2019 are as follows:




Election results in each EU member state
Due to the variety of challenges (The European Union: Quo vadis?) since the 2014 European elections, there have been some significant shifts in the political landscapes of the EU states. Especially in the 2004 enlargement of the European Union (Visegrád Group), but as well in Greece and Italy, this has clearly negative consequences in terms of democracy and the rule of law, often triggered by insubstantial nationalism and incitement against the alleged “evil EU” (while billions of euros in EU aid (especially Poland, Hungary and Greece) are received year after year with great joy, without feeling bound to the EU rules approved in the respective voluntary access to the EU) of the right-wing and xenophobic populists, nationalists and extremists.

The next European Parliament elections will be held in 2024.

EU Commission Presidency
In addition to the elections to the European Parliament, a successor of the current President of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker has to be chosen. The top candidates of the faction blocs in the European Parliament are therefore hoping to become the future EU Commission president. But that’s not the end, because even the EU Commission, the Council of Heads of State, itself has the opportunity to set up their own candidates, who did not stand for election in the European elections. Jean-Claude Juncker has been Commission President since 2014 and was Head of the Eurogroup between 2005 and 2013. Juncker leaves very big footprints after his retirement from office, which his successor will only very slowly be able to fill. Many of the initiatives he has initiated are already bearing positive fruit, others are yet to take effect. Given that the EU is still under construction, there is more than enough to do for all of its successors until one day the EU will actually be wind and weather proof. There are still a few plans and solutions for challenges that have to be developed, notably those resulting from the necessary EU reforms, so there is certainly no shortage of work that has to be done. During his tenure, Juncker managed to keep the EU supertanker in the water, even in heavy seas. In addition to the many small and large crises, the focus was always on democracy and the rule of law, which for the first time in EU history brought up rule of law processes against Poland and Hungary. The undaunted fight against internal (who are only too happy to be fed by it) and external EU enemies and fake news guns was also conducted (EU-internal among others against the Hungarian would-be autocrat Viktor Orbán and his Fidesz party, the French right-wing extremist Marine Le Pen and her Rassemblement National (formerly Front National), the Italian fascist Matteo Salvini and his Lega Nord, the apparently anti-constitutional and extreme right Alexander Gauland, Jörg Meuthen, Alice Weidel and their AfD and even more far-right / extreme partner organizations, the nationalist, Islamophobic, Dutch Geert Wilders and his Partij voor de Vrijheid, the Polish xenophobic nationalist Jarosław Kaczyński and his PiS. EU-external e.g. the US-American, right-wing, xenophobic, Islamophobic “president” Donald Trump, parts of his Republicans and especially the alt-right movement and Ku Klux Klan, the Russian autocrat Vladimir Putin, with its troll factories and fake news outlets, such as Russia Today, the Chinese autocrat Xi Jinping and his Belt and Road Initiative, the Israeli right-wing, xenophobic, Islamophobic PM Benjamin Netanyahu and his right-wing to right-wing extremist Likud and their pact with the Visegrád Group).

Media coverage
Times of Israel, 14 February 2019: Israelis, vote! In the European elections, The Guardian, 26 May 2019: EU election results 2019: across Europe, The Guardian, 26 May 2019: A fractured European parliament may be just what the EU needs, France24, 26 May 2019: French far right shows renewed strength in blow for Macron, France24, 26 May 2019: German Greens leap in EU vote as left bleeds support, The Washington Post, 26 May 2019: European Parliament elections: Voters deny traditional centrists a majority, boost euroskeptics and Greens, The New York Times, 26 May 2019: European Election Results Show Growing Split Over Union’s Future, The Guardian, 27 May 2019: EU elections: voters boost Greens and far right as centre left and right lose out, The Guardian, 27 May 2019: May laments ‘very disappointing’ EU elections as voters take Brexit revenge, France24, 27 May 2019: In UK, Farage’s Brexit party storms to EU election victory, France24, 27 May 2019: Far-right League becomes Italy’s largest party, after 5 Star’s support slumps in EU poll, The New York Times, 27 May 2019: 5 Takeaways From the European Elections, The Washington Post, 27 May 2019: Britain’s main parties hammered in E.U. elections — voters opt for those with clearer stances on Brexit, Times of Israel, 27 May 2019: Poland’s ruling party tops EU polls after campaign marked by restitution fight, Times of Israel, 27 May 2019: Europe at crossroads as far right makes big gains in vote, Haaretz, 27 May 2019: EU Election: Major Center-right and Center-left Parties Suffer Losses Amid Record High Turnout, Jerusalem Post, 27 May 2019: Europe’s consensus slides again in EU elections, Haaretz, 27 May 2019: Europe’s Far Right Populists Didn’t Get Their Tsunami. But They’re Still as Dangerous as Ever, The Guardian, 27 May 2019: Macron and Merkel at odds over EU top jobs after European elections, The Guardian, 27 May 2019: Five things we have learned from election results across Europe, The New York Times, 28 May 2019: Reasons for Hope and Concern in Europe’s Elections, France24, 28 May 2019: Macron and Merkel lock horns over next EU Commission leader, The Guardian, 29 May 2019: Europeans used to ignore their parliament. Not any longer, The Guardian, 4 June 2019: EU gives Nigel Farage 24 hours to explain Arron Banks funds, DW, 08. Juni 2019: Germany’s youth wake up to their political power, The Guardian, 19 June 2019: The Franco-German tussle at the heart of who will lead the EU, France24, 21 June 2019: EU leaders remain at odds over top posts, call crisis summit, The Guardian, 21 June 2019: European election voting problems ‘were evident five years ago’, Politico.eu, 21 June 2019: 5 takeaways from EU’s leadership failure summit, France24, 30 June 2019: EU leaders race against the clock to choose bloc’s top jobs, BBC, 30 June 2019: EU summit: Leaders split over centre-left bid for top job, France24, 1 July 2019: EU leaders set for third day of ‘very difficult’ talks on top posts, Die Zeit, 2 July 2019: 2019 European Elections: The New Colors of Europe, The New York Times, 2 July 2019: E.U. Names Germany’s Defense Minister President of European Commission, France24, 2 July 2019: EU leaders reach agreement on bloc’s top jobs (a difficult and exciting topic at the same time, especially since both sides are right on the “top candidate principle”. The one who insists that it be respected and the others who say, “Of course, we can do that if it is actually decided and actually expressed on the ballot sheets in the European elections (all candidates stand for election in all member states). Until then, the “top candidate principle” only applies in the individual states, but not at EU level.”), The Guardian, 2 July 2019: Women to head top EU institutions for first time, Reuters, 2 July 2019: EU leaders agree on France’s Lagarde to lead ECB, BBC, 2 July 2019: Germany’s Ursula von der Leyen nominated to lead EU Commission, France24, 3 July 2019: European leaders nominate new quartet to take the helm after tense talks, CNN, 3 July 2019: Ursula Von Der Leyen and Christine Lagarde win top EU jobs after marathon talks, The National, 3 July 2019: EU leaders nominate Christine Lagarde as ECB head, Times of Israel, 3 July 2019: Tough on Israel, fond of Iran: Jerusalem wary of incoming EU foreign policy czar, The New York Times, 3 July 2019: Christine Lagarde to Steer Europe in Rough Economic Seas, Times of Israel, 3 July 2019: Tough on Israel, fond of Iran: Jerusalem wary of incoming EU foreign policy czar, Jerusalem Post, 4 July 2019: New EU foreign minister volunteered in a kibbutz, The National, 4 July 2019: United states of Europe could spell the end of the western alliance, Foreign Policy, 15 July 2019: Ursula von der Leyen Isn’t Perfect, but She’s Better Than the Alternative, The Guardian, 16 July 2019: Who is Ursula von der Leyen, the new EU commission president?, France24, 16 July 2019: European Commission hopeful Von der Leyen faces sceptical parliament, BBC, 16 July 2019: EU top nominee von der Leyen in ‘green deal’ push for MEP votes, The New York Times, 16 July 2019: Dark Horse Candidate Wins Top E.U. Job, BBC, 16 July 2019: Von der Leyen becomes EU Commission head after MEPs vote, France24, 16 July 2019: Ursula von der Leyen confirmed to head EU Commission, Saudi Gazette, 16 July 2019: Von der Leyen secures powerful EU executive top job, Al Jazeera, 16 July 2019: Von der Leyen wins EU Parliament backing for top job, BBC, 16 July 2019: Von der Leyen elected EU Commission head after MEPs vote, CNN, 16 July 2019: Germany’s Ursula von der Leyen elected first female European Commission President, France24, 16 July 2019: Controversial at home, lauded abroad: Ursula von der Leyen to head EU Commission, The National, 16 July 2019: Ursula von der Leyen becomes first female EU president, Al Jazeera, 16 July 2019: Ursula von der Leyen: First woman to hold EU’s top job, The Guardian, 16 July 2019: Ursula von der Leyen elected first female European commission president, Al Jazeera, 16 July 2019: The new rulers of Europe, Politico, 19 July 2019: Von der Leyen rows back on ‘United States of Europe’, Politico.eu, 20 July 2019: Inside Ursula von der Leyen’s inbox, Haaretz, 20 July 2019: ‘Yes to Europe, No to Europe’: How a German Satirical Party Ended Up in the European Parliament, Jerusalem Post, 22 July 2019: EU Parliament gives platform to well-known PFLP member, Politico.eu, 30 July 2019: Josep Borrell: Europe’s undiplomatic envoy, Politico.eu, 9 August 2019: Von der Leyen gets pope’s blessing, European Council: Nomination process for new heads of EU institutions in 2019, Politico.eu, 28 August 2019: Von der Leyen looks to overhaul Commission power structure, France24, 10 September 2019: New EU Commission taps Timmermans to head climate change fight, BBC, 10 September 2019: New EU Commission team enshrines gender equality, Al Jazeera, 10 September 2019: Irishman set to tackle Trump and Brexit as EU trade commissioner, DW, 11 September 2019: EU post to ‘protect European way of life’ called ‘disgusting,’ ‘reprehensible’, BBC, 11 September 2019: EU chief under fire over ‘protecting way of life’ portfolio, Politico.eu, 12 September 2019: Juncker criticizes von der Leyen over ‘European way of life’ commissioner, The New York Times, 12 September 2019: New E.U. Chief Accused of Echoing Far-Right Rhetoric on Migration, Politico.eu, 16 September 2019: US envoy takes aim at EU’s next trade chief, France24, 16 September 2019: Pushing the EU’s reset button: New Commission, new challenges, Politico.eu, 17 September 2019: Winter is coming: Trump tariff clash looms for von der Leyen, Politico.eu, 19 September 2019: Stop protecting ‘European way of life’ job, MEPs tell von der Leyen, Politico.eu, 27 September 2019: Russia concerns fueled rejection of Hungary’s Commission nominee, Politico.eu, 3 October 2019: Von der Leyen’s plan to sleep on the job, Haaretz, 7 October 2019: Incoming EU Foreign Policy Chief Says Europe ‘Must Continue to Defend Two-state Solution’, Jerusalem Post, 8 October 2019: New EU foreign envoy: It’s not antisemitic to favor a two-state solution, The Guardian, 9 October 2019: Magazine aimed at MEPs ‘filled with pro-Russia content’, Politico.eu, 11 October 2019: Macron: EU’s internal ‘crisis’ shouldn’t fester, Politico.eu, 12 October 2019: Finger-pointing and charges of betrayal follow Goulard’s defeat, Politico.eu, 14 October 2019: Start of new European Commission likely delayed to December 1: EU officials, France24: 2019 European elections, Haaretz: European Union, Politico.eu: 2019 European elections, The Guardian: 2019 European elections, The New York Times: European Parliament, The Washington Post, 12 April 2019: Why European Parliament Elections Suddenly Matter, The Washington Post: Europe.

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