The Olympic Park in Munich

Monday, December 18th, 2017 - 11:00 am (CET/MEZ) Berlin | Author/Destination:
Category/Kategorie: General, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks, Sport

Olympic Park Munich © Tobi 87/cc-by-sa-4.0

Olympic Park Munich © Tobi 87/cc-by-sa-4.0

The Olympiapark München (English: Olympic Park Munich) in Munich is an Olympic Park which was constructed for the 1972 Summer Olympics. Located in the Oberwiesenfeld neighborhood of Munich, the Park continues to serve as a venue for cultural, social, and religious events such as events of worship. The Park is administered by Olympiapark München GmbH, a holding company fully owned by the state capital of Munich. The concept of a “green Olympic Games” was chosen, and so too was the orientation toward the ideals of democracy. Officials sought to integrate optimism toward the future with a positive attitude toward technology, and in so doing set aside memories of the past, such as the Olympic Games of 1936 in Berlin. The architecture firm of Günther Behnisch and its partners developed a comprehensive master plan for the sports and recreation area, which was under construction from 1968 until 1972. The landscape layout was designed by landscape architect Günther Grzimek. The eye-catching tensile structure that covers much of the park was designed by German architect and engineer Frei Otto with Günther Behnisch. In all, the project cost 1.35 billion German Marks to complete.

Olympic Stadium
The central Stadium, constructed from 1968 to 1972, was designed by the architecture firm of Behnisch and Partners. It is currently home to the highest number of staged national and international competitions in Germany. Originally constructed to hold 80,000 visitors, this number was reduced at the end of the 1990s to 69,000 due to security concerns. Following the close of the Olympic Games, the Stadium was used primarily for football matches and served as the home stadium of the FC Bayern München and TSV 1860 München teams. Since the opening of the Allianz Arena in 2005, the site is used almost exclusively for cultural events.

Olympic Hall
Also designed by the architecture firm of Behnisch and Partners, Olympic Hall is a sport and recreational facility located northeast of the Olympic Stadium. Its capacity is 12,150 with seats, or 14,000 without seats.

Small Olympic Hall
Smaller event facility at the Olympic Hall for up to 1,000 seated individuals, according to stage size.

Aquatic Center
This venue became an integral part of Olympic history when the US swimmer Mark Spitz won 7 gold medals there during the 1972 Munich Games. This amounted to a remarkable comeback for Mark Spitz, who had fallen short of the 5 gold medals expected of him at the 1968 Mexico Olympics. The venue also saw significant success by the young women’s team of the GDR, which was later found – albeit, the matter was essentially an open secret – to be the result of an extensive doping programme. One notable feature of the Munich Schwimmhalle is the way in which the cobbled paths leading to the venue continue under the canopy as far as the top of the seating area, thus creating the genuine impression of walking in off the street to one’s seat. The venue is available both to swimming teams and also to the public.

Olympic Icesportcenter
The Olympic Icestadion was built from April 1965 by the plans of Rolf Schütze and opened on 12 February 1967 with the ice hockey game between FC Bayern Munich and SC Riessersee. After using it for the Table-Tennis Worldchampionchip 1969 the Icestadion was used for the Olympic Summer games 1972 for the Boxsports. The stadium has a capacity for 6,142 visitors. and is used for the games of the team of EHC Red Bull München at the Deutsche Eishockey Liga. On the left site of the Icestadion stands an open air ice skating rink. In 1980 it was decided to build a roof over the open air rink in order to have it operational during the whole year independent of the weather conditions.. The German architectural firm Ackermann und Partner designed an elegant light-weight tensile structure spanning 100 meters length-wise. The building was completed in 1983. In 2004 the ice skating rink was closed and is now used to play indoorsoccer (SoccArena Olympiapark). On the right side of the Icestadion 1991 the new training hall for the Icesport world championship was built over the parking area after the plans of Kurt Ackermann.

View from Olympiaberg towards Olympic Stadium © Amrei-Marie/cc-by-sa-4.0 Olympic Hall and Aquatic Center © Radox Olympic Park © Diego Delso/cc-by-sa-3.0 Olympic Park Munich © Tobi 87/cc-by-sa-4.0 Infopanel © Vdkdaan/cc-by-sa-3.0
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View from Olympiaberg towards Olympic Stadium © Amrei-Marie/cc-by-sa-4.0
Velodrome
Radstadion was a velodrome that hosted the track portion of the cycling competitions for the 1972 Summer Olympics. The track was 285.714 metres (937 ft 5 in) long by 7 metres (23 ft) wide with banking that varied between 11.56 and 48.32 degrees. The Radstadion was demolished in 2015 to make way for a new arena.

Olympic Tower
The Olympiaturm has an overall height of 291 m and a weight of 52,500 tonnes. At a height of 190 m there is an observation platform as well as a small rock and roll museum housing various memorabilia. Since its opening in 1968 the tower has registered over 35 million visitors (as of 2004). At a height of 182 m there is a revolving restaurant that seats 230 people. A full revolution takes 53 minutes. The tower has one Deutsche Telekom maintenance elevator with a speed of 4 m/s, as well as two visitor lifts with a speed of 7 m/s which have a capacity of about 30 people per cabin. The travel time from the ground to the viewing platform is about 30 seconds.

Olympic Village
The Olympic Village (German: “Olympisches Dorf”) was constructed for the 1972 Summer Olympics and was used to house the athletes during the games. Since 1973 the former male section is now another neighborhood, and the female one serves as student housing (German: “Studentenviertel auf dem Oberwiesenfeld” or “Studentendorf”). Said area was completely torn down and rebuilt from zero.

Olympia Pressestadt
The Olympia Pressestadt lies west of the Olympiapark between Landshuter Allee in the east and Riesstraße in the west. It is the site of the former media center and today provides regular housing.

Munich Olympic Walk Of Stars
In 2003 the Munich Olympic Walk of Stars was constructed as a path from the Olympic Sea, als Weg am Olympiasee, in the style of the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Celebrities leave their hand- and footprints behind in the concrete. Singer Howard Carpendale was the first to do so, and since then roughly 30 personalities from culture and sport have left impressions of themselves behind.

Read more on Olympic Park Munich, muenchen.de – Olympic Park Munich and Wikipedia Olympic Park (Smart Traveler App by U.S. Department of State). Photos by Wikimedia Commons. If you have a suggestion, critique, review or comment to this blog entry, we are looking forward to receive your e-mail at comment@wingsch.net. Please name the headline of the blog post to which your e-mail refers to in the subject line.






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