The Shed in Manhattan

1 September 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, General, House of the Month, Intelligent Buildings, Museums, Exhibitions, New York City

Architect's rendering © Diller Scofidio + Renfro/cc-by-sa-3.0

Architect’s rendering © Diller Scofidio + Renfro/cc-by-sa-3.0

The Shed (formerly known as Culture Shed and Hudson Yards Cultural Shed) is a cultural center in Hudson Yards, Manhattan, New York City. Opened on April 5, 2019, the Shed commissions, produces, and presents a wide range of activities in performing arts, visual arts, and pop culture.   read more…

Hudson Heights in Upper Manhattan

12 August 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, New York City

George Washington Bridge, Hudson River and Hudson Palisades as seen from West 187th Street and Chittenden Avenue © Beyond My Ken/cc-by-sa-4.0

George Washington Bridge, Hudson River and Hudson Palisades as seen from West 187th Street and Chittenden Avenue © Beyond My Ken/cc-by-sa-4.0

Hudson Heights is a residential neighborhood of the Washington Heights area of Upper Manhattan, New York City. Most of the residences are in apartment buildings, many of which are cooperatives, and most were constructed in the 1920s through 1940s. The Art Deco style is prominent, along with Tudor Revival. Notable complexes include Hudson View Gardens and Castle Village, which were both developed by Dr. Charles V. Paterno, and were designed by George F. Pelham and his son, George F. Pelham, Jr., respectively.   read more…

92Y on the Upper East Side of Manhattan

1 June 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month, Museums, Exhibitions, New York City, Opera Houses, Theaters, Libraries

Theresa l. Kaufmann Auditorium © Yair Haklai/cc-by-sa-3.0

Theresa l. Kaufmann Auditorium © Yair Haklai/cc-by-sa-3.0

92nd Street Y (92Y) is a cultural and community center located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City, at the corner of East 92nd Street and Lexington Avenue. Its full name is 92nd Street Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association (YM-YWHA). It is not part of the YMCA. Founded in 1874 as the Young Men’s Hebrew Association (YMHA) by German-Jewish professionals and businessmen, 92nd Street Y has grown into an organization guided by Jewish principles but serving people of all races and faiths. The YMHA founded in 1889 The Educational Alliance, together with the Aguilar Free Library, and the Hebrew Institute.   read more…

Dumbo in Brooklyn

11 March 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, New York City

Empire State Building framed by Manhattan Bridge, as seen from Washington Street © MusikAnimal/cc-by-sa-4.0

Empire State Building framed by Manhattan Bridge, as seen from Washington Street © MusikAnimal/cc-by-sa-4.0

Dumbo (short for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass) is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. Several other New York City neighborhoods are known by portmanteaus, including Tribeca, SoHo, NoHo, NoMad, and Nolita in Manhattan, and BoCoCa in Brooklyn. The area known as DUMBO used to be known as Gairville. It encompasses two sections: one located between the Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridges, which connect Brooklyn to Manhattan across the East River, and another that continues east from the Manhattan Bridge to the Vinegar Hill area. The neighborhood is bounded by Brooklyn Bridge Park to the north, the Brooklyn Bridge to the west, Brooklyn Heights to the south and Vinegar Hill to the east. Dumbo is part of Brooklyn Community Board 2.   read more…

Broadway in Manhattan

27 February 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, New York City

Broadwaay in Times Square © Peter K Burian/cc-by-sa-4.0

Broadwaay in Times Square © Peter K Burian/cc-by-sa-4.0

Broadway is a road in the U.S. state of New York. Broadway runs from State Street at Bowling Green for 13 mi (21 km) through the borough of Manhattan and 2 mi (3.2 km) through the Bronx, exiting north from the city to run an additional 18 mi (29 km) through the municipalities of Yonkers, Hastings-On-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Irvington, and Tarrytown, and terminating north of Sleepy Hollow in Westchester County. It is the oldest north–south main thoroughfare in New York City, dating to the first New Amsterdam settlement, although most of it did not bear its current name until the late 19th century. The name Broadway is the English language literal translation of the Dutch name, Brede weg. Broadway in Manhattan is known widely as the heart of the American theatre industry, and is used as a metonym for it.   read more…

Fifth Avenue in Midtown Manhattan

13 February 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, New York City

The Pierre Hotel © Taj Hotels, Resorts and Palaces/cc-by-sa-3.0

The Pierre Hotel © Taj Hotels, Resorts and Palaces/cc-by-sa-3.0

Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It stretches north from Washington Square Park in Greenwich Village to West 143rd Street in Harlem. It is considered one of the most expensive and elegant streets in the world. Between 49th Street and 60th Street, Fifth Avenue is lined with prestigious boutiques and flagship stores and is consistently ranked among the most expensive shopping streets in the world. Many luxury goods, fashion, and sport brand boutiques are located on Fifth Avenue, including Louis Vuitton, Tiffany & Co., Gucci, Prada, Armani, Tommy Hilfiger, Cartier, Omega, Chanel, Harry Winston, Salvatore Ferragamo, Nike, Escada, Swarovski, Bvlgari, Emilio Pucci, Ermenegildo Zegna, Abercrombie & Fitch, De Beers, Emanuel Ungaro, Gap, Lindt Chocolate Shop, Henri Bendel, NBA Store, Oxxford Clothes, Microsoft Store, Sephora, Zara, and H&M. Luxury department stores include Lord & Taylor, Saks Fifth Avenue and Bergdorf Goodman. Fifth Avenue also is home to New York’s fifth most photographed building, the Apple Store. Many airlines at one time had ticketing offices along Fifth Avenue. In the years leading up to 1992, the number of ticketing offices along Fifth Avenue decreased. Pan American World Airways went out of business, while Air France, Finnair, and KLM moved their ticket offices to other areas in Midtown Manhattan.   read more…

Carlyle Hotel in the Upper East Side

11 February 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Hotels, New York City

Carlyle Hotel © Jim.henderson

Carlyle Hotel © Jim.henderson

The Carlyle Hotel, known formally as The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel, is a combination luxury and residential hotel located at 35 East 76th Street on the northeast corner of Madison Avenue and East 76th Street, on the Upper East Side of New York City. Opened in 1930, the hotel was designed in Art Deco style and was named after Scottish essayist Thomas Carlyle. Owned since 2001 by Rosewood Hotels & Resorts, the Carlyle is a cooperative with 190 rental rooms and suites, and 60 privately owned residences. The Carlyle Restaurant was formerly known as Dumonet at the Carlyle. The Carlyle is famous for its extraordinary discretion.   read more…

Harlem in New York

28 December 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, New York City

Cotton Club © Gotanero/cc-by-sa-3.0

Cotton Club © Gotanero/cc-by-sa-3.0

Harlem is a large neighborhood in the northern section of the New York City borough of Manhattan. Since the 1920s, Harlem has been known as a major African American residential, cultural and business center. Originally a Dutch village, formally organized in 1658, it is named after the city of Haarlem in the Netherlands. Harlem’s history has been defined by a series of economic boom-and-bust cycles, with significant population shifts accompanying each cycle. Since New York City’s revival in the late 20th century, Harlem has been experiencing the effects of gentrification and new wealth.   read more…

Yorkville in Manhattan

10 October 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, New York City

90th Street and Second Avenue © flickr.com - mike/cc-by-sa-2.0

90th Street and Second Avenue © flickr.com – mike/cc-by-sa-2.0

Yorkville is a neighborhood in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City. Its southern boundary is East 79th Street, its northern East 96th Street, its western Third Avenue, and its eastern the East River. The neighborhood, in Manhattan Community Board 8, is among the most affluent in the city. In August 1776, George Washington stationed half of his Continental Army in Manhattan, with many troops in the Yorkville area in defensive positions along the East River to protect the other half of his army if they were to retreat from Brooklyn, and to inflict damage on invading land and sea forces. Following the Battle of Long Island defeat on August 27, the Continentals implemented an orderly pivoting retreat in the Yorkville area, leading the enemy to entice the Continentals to fight by piping “Fly Away”, about a fox running away from hounds. The Continentals’ disciplined northerly retreat led to the successful Battle of Harlem Heights in September 1776.   read more…

Return to Top ▲Return to Top ▲