Statue of Liberty in New York City

8 November 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Museums, Exhibitions, New York City, UNESCO World Heritage

© flickr.com - William Warby/cc-by-2.0

© flickr.com – William Warby/cc-by-2.0

The Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World) is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor in New York, in the United States. The copper statue, a gift from the people of France to the people of the United States, was designed by French sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and its metal framework was built by Gustave Eiffel. The statue was dedicated on October 28, 1886.   read more…

Hunts Point Cooperative Market in New York

1 November 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month, New York City

© flickr.com - Doc Searls/cc-by-sa-2.0

© flickr.com – Doc Searls/cc-by-sa-2.0

The Hunts Point Cooperative Market, a 24/7 wholesale food market located on 60 acres (24 ha) in the Hunts Point neighborhood of the Bronx, New York City, is the largest food distribution center of its kind in the world. Its revenues exceed $2 billion annually.   read more…

The United States: Bon voyage!

12 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Editorial, General, Los Angeles, Miami, New York City, UNESCO World Heritage

© Lipton sale/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Lipton sale/cc-by-sa-3.0

Tourism in the United States is a large industry that serves millions of international and domestic tourists yearly. Tourists visit the US to see natural wonders, cities, historic landmarks, and entertainment venues. Americans seek similar attractions, as well as recreation and vacation areas. Tourism in the United States grew rapidly in the form of urban tourism during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. By the 1850s, tourism in the United States was well established both as a cultural activity and as an industry. New York, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and San Francisco, all major US cities (cities in the United States), attracted a large number of tourists by the 1890s. By 1915, city touring had marked significant shifts in the way Americans perceived, organized, and moved. In the US, tourism is either the first, second, or third largest employer in 29 states, employing 7.3 million, to take care of 1.19 billion trips tourists took in the US (a culinary journey through the USA). There are 2,500 registered National Historic Landmarks (NHL) recognized by the United States government and 24 World Heritage Sites. As of 2016, Orlando is the most visited destination in the United States. Meanwhile New York and Los Angeles took over rank 1 and 2, placing Orlando on rank 3. Tourists spend more money in the United States than in any other country, while attracting the second-highest number of tourists after France. All of the 50 states have nicknames.   read more…

TWA Hotel at JFK Airport in Queens

1 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, General, House of the Month, Hotels, New York City

Retired airliner is used as cocktail bar © Jag9889/cc-by-sa-4.0

Retired airliner is used as cocktail bar © Jag9889/cc-by-sa-4.0

TWA Hotel is a hotel at John F. Kennedy International Airport in Queens, New York City, that opened on May 15, 2019. It utilizes the headhouse of the TWA Flight Center airline terminal, designed in 1962 by the architect Eero Saarinen. The TWA Hotel project added two buildings on either side of the existing headhouse.   read more…

Commissioners’ Plan of 1811 for Manhattan

27 September 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, General, New York City

Central Park is by far the largest interruption of the Commissioners' Plan © Piotr Kruczek

Central Park is by far the largest interruption of the Commissioners’ Plan © Piotr Kruczek

The Commissioners’ Plan of 1811 was the original design for the streets of Manhattan above Houston Street and below 155th Street, which put in place the rectangular grid plan of streets and lots that has defined Manhattan to this day. It has been called “the single most important document in New York City’s development,” and the plan has been described as encompassing the “republican predilection for control and balance … [and] distrust of nature”. It was described by the Commission that created it as combining “beauty, order and convenience.”   read more…

The Shed in Manhattan

1 September 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, General, House of the Month, Intelligent Buildings, Museums, Exhibitions, New York City

Architect's rendering © Diller Scofidio + Renfro/cc-by-sa-3.0

Architect’s rendering © Diller Scofidio + Renfro/cc-by-sa-3.0

The Shed (formerly known as Culture Shed and Hudson Yards Cultural Shed) is a cultural center in Hudson Yards, Manhattan, New York City. Opened on April 5, 2019, the Shed commissions, produces, and presents a wide range of activities in performing arts, visual arts, and pop culture.   read more…

Hudson Heights in Upper Manhattan

12 August 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, New York City

George Washington Bridge, Hudson River and Hudson Palisades as seen from West 187th Street and Chittenden Avenue © Beyond My Ken/cc-by-sa-4.0

George Washington Bridge, Hudson River and Hudson Palisades as seen from West 187th Street and Chittenden Avenue © Beyond My Ken/cc-by-sa-4.0

Hudson Heights is a residential neighborhood of the Washington Heights area of Upper Manhattan, New York City. Most of the residences are in apartment buildings, many of which are cooperatives, and most were constructed in the 1920s through 1940s. The Art Deco style is prominent, along with Tudor Revival. Notable complexes include Hudson View Gardens and Castle Village, which were both developed by Dr. Charles V. Paterno, and were designed by George F. Pelham and his son, George F. Pelham, Jr., respectively.   read more…

92Y on the Upper East Side of Manhattan

1 June 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month, Museums, Exhibitions, New York City, Opera Houses, Theaters, Libraries

Theresa l. Kaufmann Auditorium © Yair Haklai/cc-by-sa-3.0

Theresa l. Kaufmann Auditorium © Yair Haklai/cc-by-sa-3.0

92nd Street Y (92Y) is a cultural and community center located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City, at the corner of East 92nd Street and Lexington Avenue. Its full name is 92nd Street Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association (YM-YWHA). It is not part of the YMCA. Founded in 1874 as the Young Men’s Hebrew Association (YMHA) by German-Jewish professionals and businessmen, 92nd Street Y has grown into an organization guided by Jewish principles but serving people of all races and faiths. The YMHA founded in 1889 The Educational Alliance, together with the Aguilar Free Library, and the Hebrew Institute.   read more…

Dumbo in Brooklyn

11 March 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, New York City

Empire State Building framed by Manhattan Bridge, as seen from Washington Street © MusikAnimal/cc-by-sa-4.0

Empire State Building framed by Manhattan Bridge, as seen from Washington Street © MusikAnimal/cc-by-sa-4.0

Dumbo (short for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass) is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. Several other New York City neighborhoods are known by portmanteaus, including Tribeca, SoHo, NoHo, NoMad, and Nolita in Manhattan, and BoCoCa in Brooklyn. The area known as DUMBO used to be known as Gairville. It encompasses two sections: one located between the Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridges, which connect Brooklyn to Manhattan across the East River, and another that continues east from the Manhattan Bridge to the Vinegar Hill area. The neighborhood is bounded by Brooklyn Bridge Park to the north, the Brooklyn Bridge to the west, Brooklyn Heights to the south and Vinegar Hill to the east. Dumbo is part of Brooklyn Community Board 2.   read more…

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