Große Freiheit in Hamburg

April 5th, 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Hamburg

© flickr.com - IKs World Trip/cc-by-2.0

© flickr.com – IKs World Trip/cc-by-2.0

The Große Freiheit (German for: “Great Freedom”) is a cross street on the North Side to Hamburg‘s Reeperbahn road in the St. Pauli quarter. It is part of the red-light district. The street was named in 1610 after the fact that Count Ernest of Schaumburg and Holstein-Pinneberg had granted religious freedom to non-Lutherans such as Mennonites and Roman Catholics to practise their faith here and commercial freedom for handcrafters not enrolled in the else compelling guilds.   read more…

The Great Journeys of New Zealand

April 3rd, 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

The Great Journeys of New Zealand © KiwiRail/cc-by-sa-4.0

The Great Journeys of New Zealand © KiwiRail/cc-by-sa-4.0

The Great Journeys of New Zealand is the tourism division of KiwiRail that brings together its three Scenic train services (TranzAlpine, Northern Explorer and Coastal Pacific) with its passenger ferries business, Interislander. The new division was launched in May 2017 and replaced the former tourism brand, KiwiRail Scenic Journeys.   read more…

Hong Kong–Zhuhai–Macau Bridge in China

April 1st, 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, General, House of the Month

© Kellykaneshiro/cc-by-sa-4.0

© Kellykaneshiro/cc-by-sa-4.0

The Hong Kong–Zhuhai–Macau Bridge (HZMB) is a 55-kilometre (34 mi) bridge–tunnel system consisting of a series of three cable-stayed bridges, an undersea tunnel, and four artificial islands. It is both the longest sea crossing and the longest fixed link on earth. The HZMB spans the Lingding and Jiuzhou channels, connecting Hong Kong, Macau, and Zhuhai—three major cities on the Pearl River Delta. The HZMB was designed to last for 120 years and built with a cost of 126.9 billion yuan (US$ 18.77 billion). The cost of constructing the Main Bridge was estimated at 51.1 billion yuan (US$ 7.56 billion) funded by bank loans and shared among the governments of mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau. Originally set to be opened to traffic in late 2016, the structure was completed on 6 February 2018< and journalists were subsequently given rides over the bridge. On 24 October 2018, the HZMB was opened to the public.   read more…

Carnaby Street in London

April 1st, 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, London

© SisterLondon/cc-by-sa-4.0

© SisterLondon/cc-by-sa-4.0

Carnaby Street is a pedestrianised shopping street in Soho in the City of Westminster, Central London. Close to Oxford Street and Regent Street, it is home to fashion and lifestyle retailers, including a large number of independent fashion boutiques. Streets crossing, or meeting with, Carnaby Street are, from south to north, Beak Street, Broadwick Street, Kingly Court, Ganton Street, Marlborough Court, Lowndes Court, Fouberts Place, Little Marlborough Street and Great Marlborough Street. The nearest London Underground station is Oxford Circus (on the Bakerloo, Central and Victoria lines).   read more…

Theme Week South Korea – Busan

March 30th, 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, UNESCO World Heritage

Seomyeon © flickr.com - Carey Ciuro/cc-by-2.0

Seomyeon © flickr.com – Carey Ciuro/cc-by-2.0

Busan, formerly known as Pusan and now officially Busan Metropolitan City, is South Korea‘s second most-populous city after Seoul, with a population of over 3.5 million inhabitants. It is the economic, cultural and educational center of southeastern Korea, with its port—Korea’s busiest and the 9th-busiest in the world—only about 120 miles (190 km) from the Japanese islands of Kyushu and Honshu. The surrounding “Southeast Economic Zone” (including Ulsan and South Gyeongsang) is now South Korea’s largest industrial area.   read more…

Theme Week South Korea – Incheon

March 29th, 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

© Jr55662/cc-by-sa-4.0

© Jr55662/cc-by-sa-4.0

Incheon, officially the Incheon Metropolitan City, is a city located in northwestern South Korea, bordering Seoul and Gyeonggi to the east. Inhabited since the Neolithic, Incheon was home to just 4,700 people when it became an international port in 1883. Today, about 3 million people live in the city, making it S Korea’s third most-populous city after Seoul and Busan. The city’s growth has been assured in modern times with the development of its port due to its natural advantages as a coastal city and its proximity to the South Korean capital. It is part of the Seoul Capital Area, along with Seoul itself and Gyeonggi Province, forming the world’s fourth largest metropolitan area by population.   read more…

Atlanta in Georgia

March 29th, 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Piedmont Park and Downtown skyline © flickr.com - seanpinto/cc-by-2.0

Piedmont Park and Downtown skyline © flickr.com – seanpinto/cc-by-2.0

The city serves as the cultural and economic center of the Atlanta metropolitan area, home to 5.8 million people and the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the nation. Atlanta is the seat of Fulton County and a small portion of the city extends eastward into DeKalb County. Atlanta was founded as a transportation hub at the intersection of two railroad lines in 1837. After being mostly burned to the ground during the American Civil War, the city rose from its ashes to become a national center of commerce and the unofficial capital of the “New South“. During the 1960s, Atlanta became a major organizing center of the civil rights movement, with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Ralph David Abernathy, and many other locals playing major roles in the movement’s leadership. In the decades following, the city earned a reputation as “too busy to hate” for the relatively progressive views of its citizens and leaders compared to other cities in the “Deep South“. During the modern era, Atlanta has attained international prominence as a major air transportation hub, with Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport being the world’s busiest airport by passenger traffic since 1998.   read more…

Theme Week South Korea – Daegu

March 28th, 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Dalgubeol Grand Bell at National Debt Repayment Movement Memorial Park © Timber Tank/cc-by-sa-2.0

Dalgubeol Grand Bell at National Debt Repayment Movement Memorial Park © Timber Tank/cc-by-sa-2.0

Daegu is the fourth-largest after Seoul, Busan, and Incheon, and the third-largest metropolitan area in the nation with over 2.5 million residents. Daegu and surrounding North Gyeongsang Province are often referred to as Daegu-Gyeongbuk, with a total population over 5 million. Daegu is located in south-eastern Korea about 80 km (50 mi) from the seacoast, near the Geumho River and its mainstream, Nakdong River in Gyeongsang-do. The Daegu basin, where the city lies, is the central plain of the Yeongnam region. In ancient times, there was a proto-country named Jinhan, to which the current Daegu area belonged. Later, Daegu was part of the Silla Kingdom which unified the Korean Peninsula. During the Joseon Dynasty period, the city was the capital of Gyeongsang-do, which was one of the traditional eight provinces of the country.   read more…

Theme Week South Korea – Suwon

March 27th, 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, UNESCO World Heritage

Fortifications of Suwon © flickr.com - Richard Mortel/cc-by-2.0

Fortifications of Suwon © flickr.com – Richard Mortel/cc-by-2.0

Suwon is the capital and largest metropolis of Gyeonggi-do, South Korea‘s most populous province which surrounds Seoul, the national capital. Suwon lies about 30 kilometres (19 miles) south of Seoul. It is traditionally known as “The City of Filial Piety”. With a population close to 1.2 million, it is larger than Ulsan, although it is not governed as a metropolitan city.   read more…

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