Theme Week Uruguay – Las Piedras

August 21st, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Museo de la Uva y el Vino © Roxyuru/cc-by-sa-3.0

Museo de la Uva y el Vino © Roxyuru/cc-by-sa-3.0

Las Piedras is a city in the Canelones Department of Uruguay. As of the census of 2011, it is the fifth most populated city of the country. Las Piedras is also the name of the municipality to which the city belongs. According to the 2011 census, Las Piedras had a population of 71,258. In 2010 the Intendencia de Canelones had estimated a population of 79,412 for the municipality during the elections.   read more…

Theme Week Uruguay

August 20th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Theme Weeks

Punta del Este © Roberto Tietzmann/cc-by-2.5

Punta del Este © Roberto Tietzmann/cc-by-2.5

Uruguay, officially the Oriental Republic of Uruguay, is a state in the southeastern region of South America. It borders Argentina to its west and Brazil to its north and east, with the Río de la Plata (River of Silver) to the south and the Atlantic Ocean to the southeast. Uruguay is home to an estimated 3.44 million people, of whom 1.8 million live in the metropolitan area of its capital and largest city, Montevideo (List of cities in Uruguay). With an area of approximately 176,000 square kilometres (68,000 sq mi), Uruguay is geographically the second-smallest nation in South America, after Suriname. Uruguayan culture is strongly European and its influences from southern Europe are particularly important. The tradition of the gaucho has been an important element in the art and folklore of both Uruguay and Argentina.   read more…

Wollaton Hall in Nottingham

August 20th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Museums, Exhibitions, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks

A view of Wollaton Hall west front and Stable Block from the south-west © Acabashi/cc-by-sa-4.0

A view of Wollaton Hall west front and Stable Block from the south-west © Acabashi/cc-by-sa-4.0

Wollaton Hall is an Elizabethan country house of the 1580s standing on a small but prominent hill in Wollaton Park, Nottingham. The house is now Nottingham Natural History Museum, with Nottingham Industrial Museum in the out-buildings. The surrounding parkland has a herd of deer, and is regularly used for large-scale outdoor events such as rock concerts, sporting events and festivals. Wollaton Hall Park is Grade II* listed on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens.   read more…

California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco

August 17th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Museums, Exhibitions

© Leonard G.

© Leonard G.

The California Academy of Sciences is a research institute and natural history museum in San Francisco, California, that is among the largest museums of natural history in the world, housing over 26 million specimens. The Academy began in 1853 as a learned society and still carries out a large amount of original research, with exhibits and education becoming significant endeavors of the museum during the 20th century. It is California’s oldest museum. Completely rebuilt in 2008, the building covers 400,000 square feet (37,000 square metres) and is among the newest natural history museums in the United States. The primary building in Golden Gate Park reopened on September 27, 2008.   read more…

Acadia National Park in New England

August 13th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Environment, General, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks

© Someone35/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Someone35/cc-by-sa-3.0

Acadia National Park is a United States national park located in the state of Maine in New England, southwest of Bar Harbor. The park reserves much of Mount Desert Island and associated smaller islands along the Atlantic coast. Initially created as the Sieur de Monts National Monument in 1916, the park was renamed and re-designated Lafayette National Park in 1919, and then renamed once more as Acadia National Park in 1929. Over three million people visited the park in 2016. Acadia is the oldest designated national park in the United States east of the Mississippi River, although two eastern national parks in Ontario are older: Thousand Islands (1904) and Point Pelee (1918). Today, with nearly 2.5 million visitors every year, the park is one of the ten most visited national parks in the United States due to its proximity to the metropolises of the East Coast.   read more…

Tverskaya Street in Moscow

August 10th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

Tverskaya Street, seen from Manezhnaya Square © flickr.com - Jorge Láscar/cc-by-2.0

Tverskaya Street, seen from Manezhnaya Square © flickr.com – Jorge Láscar/cc-by-2.0

Tverskaya Street, known between 1935 and 1990 as Gorky Street, is the main radial street in Moscow. The street runs Northwest from the central Manege Square in the direction of Saint Petersburg and terminates at the Garden Ring, giving the name to Tverskoy District. The route continues further as First Tverskaya-Yamskaya Street, Leningradsky Avenue and Leningradskoye Highway.   read more…

The Knesset in West Jerusalem

August 8th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Union for the Mediterranean

© Adiel lo/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Adiel lo/cc-by-sa-3.0

The Knesset (lit. the gathering or assembly) is the unicameral national legislature of Israel. As the legislative branch of the Israeli government, the Knesset passes all laws, elects the President and Prime Minister (although the latter is ceremonially appointed by the President), approves the cabinet, and supervises the work of the government. In addition, the Knesset elects the State Comptroller. It also has the power to waive the immunity of its members, remove the President and the State Comptroller from office, dissolve the government in a constructive vote of no confidence, and to dissolve itself and call new elections. The Prime Minister may also dissolve the Knesset. However, until an election is completed, the Knesset maintains authority in its current composition. The Knesset is located in Givat Ram neighborhood of Western Jerusalem.   read more…

Palmyra in Syria

August 6th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, General, Museums, Exhibitions, Palaces, Castles, Manors, Parks, UNESCO World Heritage

Cella of the Temple of Bel - destroyed in 2015 © Bernard Gagnon/cc-by-sa-3.0

Cella of the Temple of Bel – destroyed in 2015 © Bernard Gagnon/cc-by-sa-3.0

Palmyra is an ancient Semitic city (Tadmor) in present-day Homs Governorate, Syria. Archaeological finds date back to the Neolithic period, and documents first mention the city in the early second millennium BC. Palmyra changed hands on a number of occasions between different empires before becoming a subject of the Roman Empire in the first century AD.   read more…

First World Hotel & Plaza in the Genting Highlands

August 1st, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, House of the Month, Hotels

© Shahnoor Habib Munmun/cc-by-3.0

© Shahnoor Habib Munmun/cc-by-3.0

First World Hotel and Plaza is a three-star hotel in Resorts World Genting, Pahang, Malaysia. Featuring a total of 7,351 rooms, it has set the Guinness World Records for the largest hotel in the world (by number of rooms). In 2006, it featured 6,118 rooms, making it the largest hotel until The Palazzo took the title, an expansion of The Venetian located on Las Vegas Strip which was officially opened on 1 January 2008. In 2015, First World Hotel regained the title after an opening of a new block. The hotel has received 35.5 million guests since 2006.   read more…

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