German Chancellery in Berlin

January 28th, 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, Berlin, General

Main entrance © Tischbeinahe/cc-by-3.0

Main entrance © Tischbeinahe/cc-by-3.0

The Federal Chancellery (German: Bundeskanzleramt) in Berlin is the official seat and residence of the Chancellor of Germany as well as their executive office, the German Chancellery. As part of the move of the German Federal Government from Bonn to Berlin, the office moved into the new building planned by the architects Axel Schultes and Charlotte Frank. The building is part of the “Federal Belt” (Band des Bundes) called assembly in the Spreebogen, Willy-Brandt-Straße 1, 10557 Berlin.   read more…

Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin

January 27th, 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Berlin, General, Museums, Exhibitions

© Orator/cc-by-sa-4.0

© Orator/cc-by-sa-4.0

The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe (German: Denkmal für die ermordeten Juden Europas), also known as the Holocaust Memorial (German: Holocaust-Mahnmal), is a memorial in Berlin to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust, designed by architect Peter Eisenman and engineer Buro Happold. It consists of a 19,000-square-metre (200,000 sq ft) site covered with 2,711 concrete slabs or “stelae“, arranged in a grid pattern on a sloping field. The stelae are 2.38 metres (7 ft 10 in) long, 0.95 metres (3 ft 1 in) wide and vary in height from 0.2 to 4.7 metres (7.9 in to 15 ft 5.0 in). They are organized in rows, 54 of them going north–south, and 87 heading east–west at right angles but set slightly askew. An attached underground “Place of Information” (German: Ort der Information) holds the names of approximately 3 million Jewish Holocaust victims, obtained from the Israeli museum Yad Vashem. Building began on April 1, 2003, and was finished on December 15, 2004. It was inaugurated on May 10, 2005, sixty years after the end of World War II, and opened to the public two days later. It is located one block south of the Brandenburg Gate, in the Mitte neighborhood. The cost of construction was approximately 25 million.   read more…

Museum of European Cultures in Berlin

December 5th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Berlin, General, Museums, Exhibitions

© Ute Franz-Scarciglia/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Ute Franz-Scarciglia/cc-by-sa-3.0

The Museum of European Cultures – National Museums in BerlinPrussian Cultural Heritage Foundation came from the unification of the Europe-Department in the Berlin Museum of Ethnography and the Berlin Museum for Folklore in 1999. The museum focuses on the lived-in world of Europe and European culture contact, predominantly in Germany from the 18th Century until today. The museum, together with the Ethnological Museum of Berlin and the Museum of Asian Art, is located in the Dahlem Museums. The building was named after the architect Bruno Paul (1874 – 1968) and is located in the modern district of Steglitz-Zehlendorf. The museum’s exhibition rooms occupy the oldest building in the Dahlem Museums. The current Museum of European Cultures was established from several previous institutions which arose at the beginning of the 19th century and are due in part to private initiatives as well as governmental foundations.   read more…

Allied Museum in Berlin

November 12th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Berlin, General, Museums, Exhibitions

'The day the wall came down' by Veryl Goodnight © Mutter Erde

‘The day the wall came down’ by Veryl Goodnight © Mutter Erde

The Allied Museum is a museum in Berlin. It documents the political history and the military commitments and roles of the Western Allies (United States, France and Britain) in Germany – particularly Berlin – between 1945 and 1994 and their contribution to liberty in Berlin during the Cold War era. Near the Allied Museum, a sculpture by Veryl Goodnight remembers the joyous event when the Berlin Wall came down. Five wild horses are shown jumping over the remains of the wall. A statue of General Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben stands nearby.   read more…

Käthe Kollwitz Museum Berlin

October 29th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Berlin, General, Museums, Exhibitions

Käthe-Kollwitz-Museum Berlin © De-okin/cc-by-sa-3.0

Käthe-Kollwitz-Museum Berlin © De-okin/cc-by-sa-3.0

The Käthe Kollwitz Museum in Berlin owns one of the largest collections of works by the German artist Käthe Kollwitz (1867–1945). Kollwitz lived and worked in Berlin’s Prenzlauer Berg for over 50 years.   read more…

Hotel Adlon in Berlin

October 5th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Berlin, General, Hotels

© Denis Apel/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Denis Apel/cc-by-sa-3.0

The Hotel Adlon Kempinski Berlin is a luxury hotel in Berlin. It is located on Unter den Linden, the main boulevard in the central Mitte district, at the corner with Pariser Platz, directly opposite the Brandenburg Gate. The original Hotel Adlon was one of the most famous hotels in Europe. It opened in 1907 and was largely destroyed in 1945 in the closing days of World War II, though a small wing continued operating until 1984. The current hotel, which opened on August 23, 1997, is a new building with a design inspired by the original.   read more…

Museum of the Ancient Near East in Berlin

September 10th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Berlin, Museums, Exhibitions, UNESCO World Heritage

Ishtar Gate © Hnapel/cc-by-sa-4.0

Ishtar Gate © Hnapel/cc-by-sa-4.0

The Vorderasiatisches Museum (Near East Museum) is an archaeological museum in Berlin. It is in the basement of the south wing of the Pergamon Museum and has one of the world’s largest collections of Southwest Asian art. 14 halls distributed across 2,000 square meters of exhibition surface display southwest Asian culture spanning six millennia. The exhibits cover a period from the 6th millennium BCE into the time of the Muslim conquests. They originate particularly from today’s states of Iraq, Syria and Turkey, with singular finds also from other areas. Starting with the Neolithic finds, the emphasis of the collection is of finds from Sumer, Babylonia and Assyria, as well as northern Syria and eastern Anatolia.   read more…

Berlin Modernism Housing Estates

August 15th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, Berlin, UNESCO World Heritage

Großsiedlung Siemensstadt by Hugo Häring © Doris Antony/cc-by-sa-3.0

Großsiedlung Siemensstadt by Hugo Häring © Doris Antony/cc-by-sa-3.0

Berlin Modernism Housing Estates (German: Siedlungen der Berliner Moderne) are an ensemble of six subsidized housing estates from the early 20th century, listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Dating mainly from the years of the Weimar Republic (1919–1933), when the city of Berlin was particularly progressive socially, politically and culturally, they are outstanding examples of the building reform movement that contributed to improving housing and living conditions for people with low incomes through novel approaches to architecture and urban planning. The estates also provide exceptional examples of new urban and architectural typologies, featuring fresh design solutions, as well as technical and aesthetic innovations.   read more…

German Opera Berlin

May 30th, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Berlin, General, Opera Houses, Theaters, Libraries

© Andreas Praefcke/cc-by-3.0

© Andreas Praefcke/cc-by-3.0

The Deutsche Oper Berlin is an opera company located in the Charlottenburg district of Berlin. The resident building is the country’s second largest opera house and also home to the Berlin State Ballet. Since 2004 the Deutsche Oper Berlin, like the Staatsoper Unter den Linden (Berlin State Opera), the Komische Oper Berlin, the Berlin State Ballet, and the Bühnenservice Berlin (Stage and Costume Design), has been a member of the Berlin Opera Foundation.   read more…

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