The Seabourn Odyssey

December 1st, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Cruise Ships, Yacht of the Month

in Split © Ivan T./cc-by-sa-3.0

in Split © Ivan T./cc-by-sa-3.0

The Seabourn Odyssey is a cruise ship for Seabourn Cruise Line. The ship’s keel was laid in early July 2007, and when it was commissioned in 2009, it was the first new ship for Seabourn in over a decade. The ship includes 11 decks with two swimming pools, six outdoor whirlpools, water sports from the marina and a private diamond showroom. About 90% of the ship’s suites have private verandas.   read more…

The Insignia

November 1st, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Cruise Ships, Yacht of the Month

in Split © Ivan T./cc-by-sa-3.0

in Split © Ivan T./cc-by-sa-3.0

MS Insignia is the lead ship of the R class of cruise ships built for Renaissance Cruises. She is now owned by Oceania Cruises as part of its Regatta Class of ships, but recently sailed for Hapag-Lloyd as the Columbus 2. She was built in 1998 by the Chantiers de l’Atlantique shipyard in St. Nazaire, France for Renaissance Cruises as MS R One. Renaissance Cruises had begun operations in 1989, with a series of eight small luxury cruise ships constructed during the course of the next three years. In the mid-90s the company placed an order for eight identical 30,277 GT vessels.   read more…

The Marco Polo

October 1st, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Cruise Ships, Yacht of the Month

Sailing yacht and Marco Polo in Tallinn Bay © Pjotr Mahhonin/cc-by-sa-4.0

Sailing yacht and Marco Polo in Tallinn Bay © Pjotr Mahhonin/cc-by-sa-4.0

MS Marco Polo is a cruise ship owned by the Global Maritime Group under charter to UK-based Cruise & Maritime Voyages, having been previously operated by Transocean Tours. She was built as an ocean liner in 1965 by Mathias-Thesen Werft as Aleksandr Pushkin for the Soviet Union‘s Baltic Shipping Company. After major alterations and additions, the ship sailed as Marco Polo for Orient Lines from 1993 to 2008.   read more…

The Norwegian Joy

September 1st, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Cruise Ships, Yacht of the Month

© Spaceaero2/cc-by-sa-4.0

© Spaceaero2/cc-by-sa-4.0

Norwegian Joy is a cruise ship for Norwegian Cruise Line, which entered service in April 2017. She was built by Meyer Werft in Papenburg in Germany. Base ports are Shanghai and Tianjin. The ship exclusively serves Japanese ports.   read more…

The museum ship Amsterdam

August 1st, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Tall ships, Yacht of the Month

© Malis

© Malis

The Amsterdam was an 18th-century cargo ship of the Dutch East India Company (Dutch: Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie; VOC). The ship started its maiden voyage from Texel to Batavia on 8 January 1749, but was wrecked in a storm on the English Channel on 26 January 1749. The shipwreck was discovered in 1969 in the bay of Bulverhythe, United Kingdom, and is sometimes visible during low tides. The wreck site is protected under the Protection of Wrecks Act since 1974.   read more…

The sail training ship Irving Johnson

July 1st, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Tall ships, Yacht of the Month

2010 Festival of Sail © flickr.com - Port of San Diego/cc-by-2.0

2010 Festival of Sail © flickr.com – Port of San Diego/cc-by-2.0

The twin brigantines Irving Johnson and Exy Johnson are the flagships of the Los Angeles Maritime Institute‘s (LAMI) TopSail Youth Program, a non-profit organization that helps at-risk youth learn discipline and teamwork through sailing. They join LAMI’s topsail schooners the Swift of Ipswich and the Bill of Rights. The boats are named for sail training pioneers Irving and Electa “Exy” Johnson. The brigantines are based on original plans designed in the 1930s by Henry Gruber but never built. Noted yacht designer W.I.B. Crealock was brought in to adapt the plans to meet modern Coast Guard regulations and to fit LAMI’s own stringent specifications based on their years of trial and experience. Master shipbuilder Allan Rawl was retained to oversee the project.   read more…

The museum ship Nippon Maru

June 1st, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Tall ships, Yacht of the Month

Nippon Maru Memorial Park © Captain76/cc-by-sa-3.0

Nippon Maru Memorial Park © Captain76/cc-by-sa-3.0

Nippon Maru is a Japanese museum ship and former training vessel. She is permanently docked in Yokohama harbor, in Nippon Maru Memorial Park. She was built by Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation in Kobe, and was launched on 27 January 1930 alongside her sister ship Kaiwo Maru.   read more…

The museum ship Falls of Clyde

May 1st, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Tall ships, Yacht of the Month

© Alexandre/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Alexandre/cc-by-sa-3.0

Falls of Clyde is the last surviving iron-hulled, four-masted full-rigged ship, and the only remaining sail-driven oil tanker. Designated a U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1973, and National Historic Landmark in 1989, she is now a museum ship in Honolulu, but her condition has deteriorated. She is currently not open to the public. In September 2008, ownership was transferred to a new nonprofit organization, the Friends of Falls of Clyde, which intends to restore her. Efforts to raise $1.5 million to get the ship into drydock have not succeeded as of 2015. An additional $30 million may be needed to fully restore the ship. Falls of Clyde was built in 1878 by Russell and Company in Port Glasgow in Scotland, launched as the first of nine iron-hulled four-masted ships for Wright and Breakenridge’s Falls Line. She was named after the Falls of Clyde, a group of waterfalls on the River Clyde, and built to the highest standard for general worldwide trade, Lloyd’s Register A-1. Her maiden voyage took her to Karachi, now in Pakistan, and her first six years were spent engaged in the India trade. She then became a tramp pursuing general cargo such as lumber, jute, cement, and wheat from ports in Australia, California, India, New Zealand, and the British Isles.   read more…

The HMS Trincomalee

April 1st, 2018 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Tall ships, Yacht of the Month

Stern © geograph.org.uk - Ian Petticrew/cc-by-sa-2.0

Stern © geograph.org.uk – Ian Petticrew/cc-by-sa-2.0

HMS Trincomalee is a Royal Navy Leda-class sailing frigate built shortly after the end of the Napoleonic Wars. She is now restored as a museum ship in Hartlepool. Trincomalee is one of two surviving British frigates of her era—her near-sister HMS Unicorn (of the modified Leda class) is now a museum ship in Dundee. After being ordered on 30 October 1812, Trincomalee was built in Bombay (todays Mumbai) by the Wadia family of shipwrights in teak, due to oak shortages in Britain as a result of shipbuilding drives for the Napoleonic Wars. The ship was named Trincomalee after the 1782 Battle of Trincomalee off the Ceylon (Sri Lanka) port of that name.   read more…

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