Theme Week Tibet

21 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Theme Weeks, UNESCO World Heritage

Putuo Zongcheng Temple © Gisling/cc-by-sa-4.0

Putuo Zongcheng Temple © Gisling/cc-by-sa-4.0

Tibet is a region covering much of the Tibetan Plateau in Tibet Autonomous Region, China. It is the traditional homeland of the Tibetan people as well as some other ethnic groups such as Monpa, Tamang, Qiang, Sherpa, and Lhoba peoples and is now also inhabited by considerable numbers of Han Chinese and Hui people. Tibet is the highest region on Earth, with an average elevation of 5,000 m (16,000 ft). The highest elevation in Tibet is Mount Everest, Earth’s highest mountain, rising 8,848 m (29,029 ft) above sea level.   read more…

Neresheim Abbey

21 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Museums, Exhibitions

© Holger Uwe Schmitt/cc-by-sa-4.0

© Holger Uwe Schmitt/cc-by-sa-4.0

Neresheim Abbey or the Abbey of Saints Ulrich and Afra, Neresheim is located above the town of Neresheim in Baden-Württemberg, southern Germany. It is now a Benedictine monastery and is part of the Beuronese Congregation.   read more…

Old Synagogue in Essen

18 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

© Tuxyso/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Tuxyso/cc-by-sa-3.0

The Old Synagogue (German: Alte Synagoge) is a cultural meeting center and memorial in the city of Essen in Germany. It is located in the center of the city on Edmund-Körner-Platz 1 (formerly Steeler Straße 29), close to the present city hall. The memorial center was founded in 1980 and is accommodated in the pre-war Jewish community’s synagogue. The synagogue, together with the attached Rabbinerhaus (House of the Rabbi), which today houses the Salomon Ludwig Steinheim Institute, was finished after a two-year construction period in 1913. It was originally consecrated as the Neue Synagoge (New Synagogue). Today the building is one of the largest, best preserved and architecturally most impressive testimonies to Jewish culture in pre-war Germany.   read more…

Temple Square in Salt Lake City

16 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Museums, Exhibitions

Salt Lake Temple © Famartin/cc-by-sa-4.0

Salt Lake Temple © Famartin/cc-by-sa-4.0

Temple Square is a 10-acre (4.0 ha) complex, owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), in the center of Salt Lake City, Utah, and is considered “The Vatican of the Mormons“. In recent years, the usage of the name has gradually changed to include several other church facilities that are immediately adjacent to Temple Square. Contained within Temple Square are the Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake Tabernacle, Salt Lake Assembly Hall, the Seagull Monument, and two visitors’ centers. The square was designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1964, recognizing the Mormon achievement in the settlement of Utah.   read more…

Choral Synagogue of Vilnius

14 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General

© Kontis Šatūnas

© Kontis Šatūnas

The Choral Synagogue of Vilnius in Lithuania is the only synagogue in Vilnius that is still in use. The other synagogues were destroyed partly during World War II, when Lithuania was occupied by Nazi Germany, and partly by the Soviet authorities after the war.   read more…

The United States: Bon voyage!

12 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Editorial, General, Los Angeles, Miami, New York City, UNESCO World Heritage

© Lipton sale/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Lipton sale/cc-by-sa-3.0

Tourism in the United States is a large industry that serves millions of international and domestic tourists yearly. Tourists visit the US to see natural wonders, cities, historic landmarks, and entertainment venues. Americans seek similar attractions, as well as recreation and vacation areas. Tourism in the United States grew rapidly in the form of urban tourism during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. By the 1850s, tourism in the United States was well established both as a cultural activity and as an industry. New York, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and San Francisco, all major US cities (cities in the United States), attracted a large number of tourists by the 1890s. By 1915, city touring had marked significant shifts in the way Americans perceived, organized, and moved. In the US, tourism is either the first, second, or third largest employer in 29 states, employing 7.3 million, to take care of 1.19 billion trips tourists took in the US (a culinary journey through the USA). There are 2,500 registered National Historic Landmarks (NHL) recognized by the United States government and 24 World Heritage Sites. As of 2016, Orlando is the most visited destination in the United States. Meanwhile New York and Los Angeles took over rank 1 and 2, placing Orlando on rank 3. Tourists spend more money in the United States than in any other country, while attracting the second-highest number of tourists after France. All of the 50 states have nicknames.   read more…

St. Michael’s Church in Hamburg

11 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: General, Hamburg

Port of Hamburg and St. Michael's Church © Dietmar Rabich/cc-by-sa-4.0

Port of Hamburg and St. Michael’s Church © Dietmar Rabich/cc-by-sa-4.0

St. Michael’s Church (German: Hauptkirche Sankt Michaelis), colloquially called Michel, is one of Hamburg‘s five Lutheran main churches (Hauptkirchen) and one of the most famous churches in the city. St. Michaelis is a landmark of the city and it is considered to be one of the finest Hanseatic Protestant baroque churches. The church was purposely built Protestant unlike many other Hamburg churches which were originally built by Roman Catholics and were converted to Protestantism during the Reformation. It is dedicated to the Archangel Michael. A large bronze statue, standing above the portal of the church shows the archangel conquering the devil. The 132-meter high Baroque spire totally covered with copper is a prominent feature of Hamburg’s skyline and has always been a landfall mark for ships sailing up the river Elbe.   read more…

Mickey’s Diner in Saint Paul

9 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, Design & Products, General

© Tenzin Dongag/cc-by-sa-3.0

© Tenzin Dongag/cc-by-sa-3.0

Mickey’s Diner is a classic diner in downtown Saint Paul, Minnesota. It has been in continuous operation at the same location since 1939. Designed to resemble a railroad dining car, the prefabricated building was constructed in 1937 by the Jerry O’Mahony Diner Company of Elizabeth, New Jersey, then shipped to Saint Paul by rail. Its unusual architecture made it a local landmark. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983 for having local significance in the themes of architecture and commerce. It was nominated for being “a beloved, longstanding and unique social institution,” an unaltered example of railroad car-style diners, and one of the few surviving examples of its type in the American Midwest.   read more…

Aachen Cathedral

7 October 2019 | Author/Destination: | Rubric: Architecture, General, UNESCO World Heritage

© CEphoto - Uwe Aranas/cc-by-sa-3.0

© CEphoto – Uwe Aranas/cc-by-sa-3.0

Aachen Cathedral is a Roman Catholic church in Aachen,Germany, and the see of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Aachen. One of the oldest cathedrals in Europe, it was constructed by order of the emperor Charlemagne, who was buried there in 814. From 936 to 1531, the Palatine Chapel saw the coronation of thirty-one German kings and twelve queens. The church has been the mother church of the Diocese of Aachen since 1802. In 1978, Aachen Cathedral was one of the first 12 items to be listed on the UNESCO list of world heritage sites.   read more…

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